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Volcano

BUSINESS
May 24, 2010 | By Tom Belden
CHICAGO - Companies that spend millions of dollars a year for international business travel are grappling with a new problem: How exactly do their people plan trips to Europe and throughout the continent when a pesky Icelandic volcano not only makes a mess of airline schedules but could also continue spewing ash into the air for months, years, or even centuries? No topic prompted more discussion than "the volcano" at the annual education conference of the Association of Corporate Travel Executives here last week.
NEWS
August 3, 1991 | By ADAM GARFINKLE
Every year since well before most of us were born, Time magazine has selected a "Man of the Year" to put on its most renowned cover of the publishing season. In more recent times, owing to feminist sensitivities about the gender bias of the English language, we now refer to a "Person of the Year. " This year, so far anyway, no person stands out as an obvious and worthy candidate, so perhaps the label should be broadened yet again. Indeed, the nod should go not to a man or a woman but to a volcanic mountain - Mount Pinatubo in the Philippines.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 14, 1990 | By Bob Strauss, Special to the Daily News
There is no delicate way to put it: faking the most famous orgasm in movie history is a hard act to follow. But Meg Ryan, who gave "going for deli" a whole new meaning in last summer's hit comedy "When Harry Met Sally," tries to top herself in her new movie, "Joe Versus the Volcano. " Co-starring Tom Hanks as a paper-pushing shlub who agrees to throw himself into a South Seas volcano in exchange for a few months of high living, the film has three major female roles. They are Joe's repressed co-worker DeDe, a hot-blooded L.A. sexpot named Angelica, and the level-headed Patricia, who accompanies Joe on his eventful Pacific voyage, ultimately wins his heart and jumps alongside him into that volcano.
NEWS
November 7, 1996 | By Fawn Vrazo, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
A beautiful naked woman dances for eternity on a faded mural adorning one of the ancient Roman buildings here. Lithe, young and carefree, she seductively twirls a diaphanous blue veil around her hips. What is her name? Could it be Silvia? Or Domenica? Or even . . . France? Sorry, those names are just the graffiti that some lawless tourists have scrawled beneath her graceful form. Nearby, other tourist atrocities are on display: soda cans and wine bottles tossed into ancient clay food jars, initials scraped into ancient walls.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 25, 1997 | By Desmond Ryan, INQUIRER MOVIE CRITIC
Volcano marks Hollywood's second successful attempt this year to make a molehill out of a mountain. And it's the first film to seek to fashion a heart-wrenching moment out of the survival of a pot-bellied pig. The same pig, bloodied but unbowed, must be responsible for the Bad Dialogue Hall of Fame line near the beginning of this eruption of popcorn pyrotechnics and nonstop idiocy: "Look at those rats! They're cooked!" No human screenwriter could possibly have penned it. Los Angeles is, of course, notorious for weird restaurants, and some adventurous gourmet may think this outburst promises a rather literal way of cooking ratatouille.
NEWS
August 24, 1997 | By Larry Fish, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Until two years ago, the small island of Montserrat was a placid, lustrous green gem of 39 mountainous square miles rising invitingly from the blue Caribbean, 350 miles southeast of Puerto Rico. It is still uncommonly lovely, but now the mountains and the sea compete at times for the eye with a volcanic cloud rising 30,000 feet. "It is beautiful and mesmerizing when you look at the clouds," said Heather Sawkill, an English speech therapist doing a two-year tour in Montserrat's now-suspended schools.
NEWS
December 2, 1993 | By JAMES K. GLASSMAN
Inflation is running at just 3 percent and oil is hitting new lows, but the price of a bushel of American yellow corn has soared by one-third this year, and the reason may be the eruption of a volcano in the Philippines 2 1/2 years ago. Corn is by far the most valuable crop in the United States, worth nearly $20 billion last year. While it can be popped, eaten on the cob and turned into margarine and ethanol, corn is mainly used as feed for animals. When the price of corn rises, the price of meat usually rises, as do the prices of lots of other things, though the full effect can take time.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 17, 2010
8 p.m. HISTORY This two-hour special takes viewers to six locations believed by some to be actual entrances to hell itself, including a cave in the Central American jungles, a volcano in Iceland and a lake of fire in Africa, all of which share eerie and striking similarities.
NEWS
April 25, 1997 | by Gary Thompson, Daily News Movie Critic
"Volcano" is full of surprises, the biggest being that there is no volcano in it. At least not a volcano as we've come to know them - a big mountain with a hole at the top through which magma spews forth from time to time. The so-called volcano in "Volcano" is just a stream of molten rock in downtown Los Angeles that sneaks through an earthquake fissure in MacArthur Park (someone left a cake out in the lava) and races down Wilshire Boulevard, destroying cars and department stores.
NEWS
July 15, 1992 | Daily News wire services
MANILA PINATUBO BLOWS ITS TOP AGAIN After a 10-month lull, Mount Pinatubo came to life yesterday, spewing steam and ash. No casualties were reported, but the eruption sent avalanches of debris into river channels, threatening some villages. The eruption was far less dramatic than that of June 1991, when the volcano erupted after 600 years of dormancy, sending superhot gases flowing down the slopes, avalanches crashing into villages, and ash rising 22 miles high.
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