CollectionsVolcano
IN THE NEWS

Volcano

NEWS
April 2, 2007 | By Barbara Baals von Franzke
In September, my son asked his new teacher if he could do a magic trick in class. "Sure," she said. Two days later, dressed in a vest, cape, top hat and gloves, he did three. Later, he explained to the class that he learned the tricks by reading a magic book. That month, two other kids did tricks, too. And the teacher made time for each of them, including one who made a stuffed bunny magically appear. In October, a fierce wind blew through the classroom window, knocking over the teacher's books and sending her coffee cup crashing to the floor.
NEWS
February 25, 2007 | By James Dannenberg FOR THE INQUIRER
Show me an accessible adventure, and I'm game. So I recently resolved to conquer two huge mountains in record time - 24 hours. Nepal's Everest and Pakistan's K2? No, my objectives were a bit closer to home: the Big Island's Mauna Kea and Mauna Loa volcanoes, Hawaii's largest. If you measure them from their below-sea-level bases to their peaks, Mauna Kea and Mauna Loa are both at least 33,000 feet tall, almost a mile higher than Everest. If you want to get technical about it, in the record books Mauna Kea measures 13,796 feet above sea level and Mauna Loa, 13,677.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 16, 2007 | By Glenn Whipp LOS ANGELES DAILY NEWS
I never thought I'd say this . . . but here goes. I miss Meg Ryan. Especially this time of year, when soggy romantic comedies starring the likes of Mandy Moore (!) remind us that since Ryan abdicated her throne with 2001's Kate & Leopold, no actress has come along to make Valentine's Day movie-going safe again. Say what you will about Ryan's twinkly persona, but nobody this side of Doris Day had a longer run as a romantic-comedy queen. And the movies she made - even the misfires - were at least fun. I'd gladly catch Ryan - playing three women, no less - in Joe Versus the Volcano again before watching Sandra Bullock trot out one of her wounded lonely-hearts or enduring an endless string of Renee Zellweger scrunchy faces.
NEWS
February 26, 2006 | By Steve Goldstein INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
When the most famous volcano in America began rumbling again in 2004, it was like a siren song. The lyrics were: "Build a new lava dome, and they will come. " Not being disaster groupies, we didn't drop everything and head out to western Washington. But when an opportunity arose for a family trip to Portland, Ore., in June, we knew the first place we wanted to visit. It's an easy, one-hour drive north on Interstate 5 to Castle Rock, Wash., the gateway to Mount St. Helens National Volcanic Monument, as it is somewhat grandiosely called.
NEWS
June 5, 2005 | By Jeremy Schmidt FOR THE INQUIRER
Summer evening settles quietly over Yellowstone National Park. Shadows deepen the forest. The air turns cool. Steam rising from hundreds of hot springs forms a thickening ground fog. Elk drift wraithlike across the meadows, grazing on tender summer herbs. This is Yellowstone, wild and peaceful, as most people know it. Few realize that America's flagship national park is also a place of unimaginable violence. Catastrophic destruction on a scale beyond all human experience has ravaged the region many times.
NEWS
March 27, 2005 | By Bonnie McMeans FOR THE INQUIRER
The beautiful Hawaiian island of Maui is home to Haleakala, called by some the largest dormant volcano in the world. At 10,023 feet above sea level, the volcano boasts a crater that some say would fit Manhattan, spectacular sunrises and sunsets, a ruggedly beautiful landscape, and a terrific view of the stars at night. Most travelers who visit the summit go down the way they came up: by car. My husband and I, like many intrepid tourists, chose to bike down, coasting 38 miles along switchbacks at roughly 15 to 25 m.p.h.
NEWS
March 25, 2005 | By Bill Bonvie
If recent history has taught us nothing else, it is that we always seem to plan for the wrong things to go wrong. Remember Y2K? That was the computer glitch that was supposed to turn the turn of the millennium (well, actually, the arrival of the year prior to the turn of the millennium) into instant turmoil. For months before the event, even as teams of experts joined in a frantic eleventh-hour attempt to keep civilization from being plunged into chaos and confusion, citizens were busy preparing for it by stocking their homes with emergency provisions, water, generators and guns.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 6, 2004 | By Karen Heller INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Imax movies are stationary roller-coasters, in your face, down the gullet, leaving squat to the imagination. They're more visual assault weapons than entertainment. The theaters are the trophy additions of science museums, misguided logic in temples of contemplation while overshadowing the beloved planetarium, places of infinite wonder and nascent snogging. Underestimating contemporary patrons, the thinking is that children won't come unless lured by yet another video, this one on a dinosaur scale.
NEWS
September 29, 2003 | By Faye Flam INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
A giant tidal wave could ravage the East Coast the next time a volcano erupts in the Canary Islands, according to a British geologist. Simon Day, of University College, London, says the whole side of the Cumbre Vieja volcano - a rock slab about the size of Manhattan - has begun to separate and is poised to plunge into the Atlantic sometime in the next few hundred thousand years. The resulting waves would dwarf an ordinary tsunami. Day predicts a "mega-tsunami," - a series of waves 60 to 100 feet high slamming into the entire coast from Miami to Boston.
NEWS
December 7, 2002 | By Ken Dilanian INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Mount Etna is awake again, spewing molten rock toward the towns below. By day, Europe's most active volcano dominates the Sicilian landscape, belching black ash that falls like snow, stinging unprotected eyes, and forcing closure of the local airport. By night, all that is visible is the bright orange pillar of lava, a giant candle flame against the sky. Last weekend, halfway up the 10,990-foot peak, past the tourist lodges and the police barricade, firefighters, scientists and curious hikers marveled at the churning, unforgiving river of lava as it swallowed trees and plant life on its way down the mountain.
« Prev | 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
|
|
|
|
|