FEATURED ARTICLES
ENTERTAINMENT
November 16, 2001 | By Steven Rea INQUIRER MOVIE CRITIC
Anxious, antsy, and fueled up on drugs and drink, Vince - a volunteer firefighter and dealer from the West Coast - paces around his Lansing, Mich., motel room, stopping to do push-ups, chug a beer, or check himself in the mirror. He's awaiting the arrival of his high school friend, John, a moviemaker whose inaugural work is screening at the local film festival. Lansing is where the two grew up. There's plenty to talk about. Boy, is there ever. Tape is a super-taut and superbly acted three-character piece adapted by Stephen Belber, who wrote the play, and directed by Richard Linklater.
NEWS
May 19, 1994 | By Mike Biglin, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Conestoga's Matt Halfpenny wrapped up one of the greatest careers in District 1 doubles tennis history, winning his second district championship in four finals appearances, in yesterday's tournament final at Wissahickon. However, it was the play of Halfpenny's partner, senior classmate Stig Knutsen, that sent the Pioneers over Brian Nelsen and Matt Clapp of West Chester East. "If it wasn't for Stig, we wouldn't be champs," Halfpenny said after their hard-fought, wild and woolly 6-4, 4-6, 7-5 victory.
NEWS
June 18, 1989 | By John McBride, Special to The Inquirer
Northeast's Joe Zapf cruised through the regular season unbeaten in Public League boys' tennis, hardly breaking a sweat. Tuesday, Zapf appeared to be on his way to the league's individual championship. All that stood between Zapf, a Vikings junior, and the title was Central senior Nima Emgushov, a foe he had defeated, 6-4, 6-1, in a regular-season match. But, after Zapf took the opening set, Emgushov put together a stunning rally and captured the next two sets easily, winning the title.
NEWS
September 4, 1991 | by Joe O'Dowd, Daily News Staff Writer
A gang of rowdy bicyclists raced down a South Philadelphia street shortly after midnight today, firing a volley of shots that wounded four young girls. None of the girls was seriously wounded, but all were hospitalized. One suspect was arrested after he was apprehended on his bicycle several blocks from the shooting scene. Several other suspects still are being sought. Police said that "several" bicyclists began their shooting spree in the 700 block of S. 13th Street, below Fitzwater Street.
SPORTS
June 29, 1992 | By Mayer Brandschain, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Jim Kohr, of York, Pa., won the Eastern States Clay Court Tennis Championship by defeating second-seeded David Jespersen of Bridgeton, N.J., 6-4, 6-1, yesterday at the Idle Hour Tennis Club. Exchanges were lengthy in the 1-hour, 30-minute match in which fourth- seeded Kohr was the steadier player and missed few shots from his backhand side. Jespersen rallied from 2-4 to 4-4, 30-15 in the first set, then foundered in errors and lost the next seven points and set. Jespersen's erratic performance continued into the second set and he lost the first four games before taking his only game by virtue of coming in to volley.
SPORTS
August 17, 1994 | By Mayer Brandschain, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Victories by first-seeded Lilia Osterloh of Columbus, Ohio, and second- seeded Traci Green of Friends Select School in the second round of the USTA Junior International Girls Grass Court Tennis Championship yesterday at the Philadelphia Cricket Club produced action just the reverse of their first- round triumphs Monday. Osterloh, the women's national clay court champion, drew away from a closely contended beginning and reeled off 10 successive games for a 6-2, 6-0 victory over Leigh Eichelberger of Center Valley, Pa. On the other hand, Green battled headily and intensely for 1 1/2 hours to subdue Annica Cooper of Geneva, Ill., 6-3, 6-4. This was an absorbing struggle that showed grass-court play did not have to be limited to serve-volley dueling.
SPORTS
September 2, 1994 | By Mayer Brandschain, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
At one point in yesterday's U.S. 50-and-over Grass Court Tennis Championship at the Germantown Cricket Club, Ed Turville of Atlanta had the perfect opportunity to beat top-seeded Jim Parker of Houston in the quarterfinals. Turville was at match point at 5-4 in the second set, and he was treated to a setup shot, a shallow half-volley from Parker. But Turville goofed. Close to the net and with open territory before him, Turville plunked a leaping backhand volley into the net to lose the chance for a victory.
SPORTS
March 1, 1996 | By Diane Pucin, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
It was a lucky shot, Tomas Carbonell admitted. A desperate, running half-volley. "I make that one out of 20 times," Carbonell said later. "No, I make that one out of 100 times. " But this was the time, in a second-set tiebreaker that Carbonell absolutely needed to win. This half-volley went skidding by Thomas Enq-vist. It made the tiebreaker score 5-5. It was the one ball that gave Carbonell a kick in the pants, made him think, "I can win this match. " And Carbonell won this match.
SPORTS
August 15, 1991 | By Mayer Brandschain, Special to The Inquirer
Vasco Goncalves, the junior titleholder from Portugal, won an intensely fought serve-volley match against Tom Shimada of Gulph Mills by 6-4, 6-2 to gain the quarterfinals of the USTA International Boys' Grass Court Tennis Championship yesterday at the Philadelphia Cricket Club. Lefthanded Goncalves built first-set leads of 2-0, 3-1 and 5-2 in superb volley action, much of it on the run and lunge. A strong surge by Shimada then closed the gap to 5-4. Goncalves then served out the set with a loss of one point.
SPORTS
August 17, 1993 | By Mayer Brandschain, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Nino Louarssabichvili, 16, of the Republic of Georgia, made a successful debut as the first-seeded player in a field of 64 from 24 states and five foreign countries in the USTA Junior Girls International Grass Court Tennis Championship yesterday at the Philadelphia Cricket Club. Louarssabichvili showed class with her service and volley in defeating Victoria Hunt of Olney, Md., 6-2, 6-2. It was notLouarssabichvili's first experience with grass, for she won the English junior title on that surface.
1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
ARTICLES BY DATE
SPORTS
June 24, 2013 | Associated Press
LONDON - As her agent nodded along approvingly from a front-row seat, Serena Williams sounded contrite and composed. Well-rehearsed, too. Williams even managed to crack herself up with a couple of jokes during her news conference at Wimbledon as the defending champion, where the primary topic was hardly her 31-match winning streak or her bid for a sixth title at the All England Club or her injured sister Venus' absence from the field. Instead, more than half the questions at yesterday's session revolved around themes generating the most buzz on the eve of tennis' oldest and most prestigious Grand Slam tournament: what Williams was quoted as saying in a recent magazine article - and Maria Sharapova's surprisingly forceful verbal swipe in reaction to that story.
SPORTS
June 23, 2013 | By Howard Fendrich, Associated Press
LONDON - Maria Sharapova took quite a shot at Serena Williams, and it was nowhere near a tennis court. At her pre-Wimbledon news conference Saturday, Sharapova was asked about a recent Rolling Stone article in which the author surmised that critical comments directed at an unnamed player by Williams were referring to Sharapova. "We have a tremendous amount of respect for what we do on the court. I just think she should be talking about her accomplishments, her achievements, rather than everything else that's just getting attention and controversy," Sharapova said.
SPORTS
January 14, 2013 | By Mike Jensen, Inquirer Staff Writer
Donald Trump isn't out here. There are no visible supermodels or former Seinfeld cast members taking in the scene at Court 4 at New York's USTA Billie Jean King National Tennis Center. The people who are here want to be here, leaning against trash cans and standing on bleachers. Many are straining for a look at the full court. A determined security guard ("Hey!") holds back more from getting close. Most of the 1,000 or so onlookers are dressed as if they are playing themselves - bald men in fraying caps, women in tennis skirts.
NEWS
September 15, 2012 | By Michael Matza, Inquirer Staff Writer
Tim Shoup, owner of Green Earth Gardens, a landscaping company at 1330 Conshohocken Road in Lafayette Hill, today described some of the events leading up to the gunfire that left Police Officer Bradley Fox and an alleged suspect dead. More than 17 hours after the slaying, Montgomery County officials have only said Fox was killed in a confrontation with the suspect of a hit-and-run crash and Shoup's account is the first to detail some of the events surrounding the tragedy. In a telephone interview, Shoup said he was welcoming his crews back to his supply yard around 6 p.m. Thursday, and preparing to leave, when he heard the grating sound of metal on metal.
NEWS
May 7, 2007 | By Toby Zinman FOR THE INQUIRER
We hear the smack of a tennis ball. We hear a crowd applaud wildly. The lights go up on Angela Lansbury and Marian Seldes sitting in stadium chairs. The audience applauds wildly. Deuce, Terrence McNally's new play about two aging tennis stars, also is about its two aging stage stars, and it is clear that Lansbury and Seldes are still smashing them across the net. We learn that Leona Mullen (Lansbury) and Midge Barker (Seldes) retired from professional doubles tennis 30 years ago - before women's tennis reached its current status of a big-money, big-power sport.
NEWS
June 16, 2005 | By Carolyn Davis
The question should not be whether reasonable restrictions on the sale of handguns would help make Philadelphia streets safer. As one part of an aggressive and comprehensive antiviolence strategy, they surely would. The question is why Pennsylvania's two Republican senators, Arlen Specter and Rick Santorum, who were in Philadelphia on Monday for a U.S. Senate hearing on youth violence, are so comfortable siding with criminals rather than with the children killed and maimed in gun violence in this city and across the country.
NEWS
May 4, 2005 | By Dwight Ott and Elisa Ung INQUIRER STAFF WRITERS
Camden Mayor Gwendolyn Faison said her record was clear: "Camden is on the move. " Assemblywoman Nilsa Cruz-Perez said Faison's record wasn't good enough. If Cruz-Perez is elected, she said repeatedly, "the community will be engaged from the very beginning. " City Councilman Ali Sloan El started most of his sentences, "As mayor, I would . . .," and he called for the restoration of "democracy, which has been taken away from some of our people. " And Keith Walker said he would push through an ordinance that would crack down on City Council members' double-dipping with their jobs.
NEWS
October 21, 2004 | By Thomas Fitzgerald and Ron Hutcheson INQUIRER STAFF WRITERS
For all his tough talk, President Bush is a weak leader who has bungled the war in Iraq and left America more vulnerable to terrorists, Sen. John Kerry contended yesterday in a speech designed to confront the perception of a strength gap. Bush, speaking to supporters about the same time in Mason City, 80 miles away, fired back, suggesting that Kerry would put the nation at risk of another terrorist attack. The candidates' focus on terrorism and the Iraq war in the closing days of the campaign underscored the extent to which national security has shoved aside other issues.
NEWS
September 3, 2004 | By Dan DeLuca INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The Republican National Convention is a giant beast, an inescapable 800-pound gorilla that has rerouted traffic, chased tourists away, and aggravated already testy New Yorkers to no end. That's the way it seems, anyway, if you're stuck in a traffic jam around Madison Square Garden, or if you encounter packs of cowboy-hatted delegates or hairy, tattooed protesters on the street. But for all the hubbub and hype that surround the convention, it's not even the biggest event going on in New York.
NEWS
July 13, 2004 | By Terri Akman
Nestled among the towering century-old oaks on a calm, dead-end road sits the Haddon Field Club, a quaint 102-year-old tennis club in Haddonfield. As my son played in the club's junior tournament each year, I realized how much the games, and life, have changed on these sturdy tennis courts. The courts have been overhauled through the years, with a technology called Har-Tru replacing the old red clay. In the club's earlier days, players used rackets made of wood and a natural string such as cow gut, as opposed to today's oversize titanium heads featuring nylon strings.
1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
|
|
|
|
|