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NEWS
December 1, 2012 | By Robert Moran, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The roadway gridlock around Philadelphia Friday evening was on the mind of Twitter user Savannah Witkus. "Philly traffic tonight makes me want to stab my eyes with a spork," she wrote at 6 p.m. from her @savannahwitkus account. Police said the highways were crowded with high seasonal volume - people leaving work and going holiday shopping. There were residual delays from the departure of President Obama from Philadelphia during the afternoon; police temporarily shut roads his motorcade traveled.
BUSINESS
November 12, 2007
IN GENERAL E-mail: . Main number: 215-854-2450 . Because of call volume, callers may be asked to leave a message. Please do not send faxes. Mailing address (e-mail is preferred): 400 N. Broad St., Box 8263, Philadelphia 19130. BUSINESS CALENDAR ON THE BOARDS EDITORS 215-854-2466, tgnoffo@phillynews.com 215-854-2980, marmstrong@phillynews.com 215-854-4177, tginsberg@phillynews.com REPORTERS 215-854-4944, sburling@phillynews.
BUSINESS
July 22, 1995 | The Philadelphia Inquirer
The Dow bounced around, but, after all was said and done, closed unchanged. Volume was heavy. For the week, 2 billion trades were made.
BUSINESS
May 11, 1995 | The Philadelphia Inquirer
The Dow rose to another record for the third-straight session yesterday. It was the first time the index broke the 4,400 level. Volume: 382.47 million shares.
NEWS
July 16, 1992 | For The Inquirer / JERRY TRITT
The 100 block of West Hillcrest Avenue in Havertown must be home to lots of high-volume shoppers, judging by the sign warning of "Residential Unloading. "
NEWS
December 14, 2012 | MARKETWATCH
  CHICAGO - Backlogs in foreclosure processing are causing delays in home-price improvement and could wind up affecting the cost of a mortgage. The situation appears worst in New York, where it takes an average of nearly three years - 1,072 days, to be exact - for a home to go through the foreclosure process. It's not much better in New Jersey, where it took an average of 931 days to foreclose on a home, or in Florida, about 858 days. Nationwide, the average time for homes to spend in the foreclosure process was 382 days.
NEWS
February 21, 2013
Q: I saw that some insiders at a company recently sold several million shares of its stock. When insiders sell so many shares, who are the buyers? - F.A., Decatur, Ill.   A: Shares sold by insiders such as officers, directors or owners of a company are sold in the market, where for every seller there's usually a buyer. The catch: If there are many more shares for sale than there are interested buyers, the price will drop - until it reaches a point at which buyers will buy. Several million shares might seem like a lot, but in a typical trading day many companies experience a high volume of trading.
NEWS
October 25, 2011 | By Randall Chase, ASSOCIATED PRESS
DOVER, Del. - Chemical maker DuPont says strong demand for its agricultural products helped boost third-quarter net income by 23 percent. E.I. DuPont de Nemours & Co. on Tuesday reported net income of $452 million, or 48 cents per share, for the period ended Sept. 30. That's up from $367 million, or 40 cents per share, for the same period a year ago. In last year's quarter, the expiration of patents in DuPont's pharmaceuticals segment lowered net income by 13 cents per share. Shares were up 5 cents, to $46.14 in middday trading.
BUSINESS
October 23, 2013 | By Jane M. Von Bergen, Inquirer Staff Writer
A former Herr Foods Inc. route sales driver has sued the Chester County snack-food maker, saying it violated federal labor laws because he and other drivers were not paid overtime even though they often worked more than 50 hours a week. The suit, filed last week in U.S. District Court in Philadelphia, hinges on whether Kalvin Drummond, 44, of Philadelphia, is primarily an outside salesperson or a driver. The U.S. Fair Labor Standards Act says outside salespeople do not have to be paid overtime.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 5, 2012 | Freelance
"I will make it felony to drink small beer. " - Henry IV, Part 2.   If he had his way, Shakespeare - or at least his memorable character, Jack Cade, who declared his contempt for weak beer (and lawyers) - would be filing criminal charges on the first-ever Session Beer Day this Saturday. The day is intended as a nationwide effort to encourage bars to serve flavorful yet easy-drinking, low-alcohol ales and lagers that can be enjoyed for extended hours, or a session.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
April 10, 2016
By Simon Callow Viking. 496 pp. $40 Reviewed by Michael Magras He was an actor and director of such intensity that some of the leading ladies he kissed during performances - Eartha Kitt in the play Time Runs , Margaret Lockwood in the film Trent's Last Case - ended up with bruised lips. He was known to eat at one sitting "a meal consisting of five copious courses, two bottles of red wine and many glasses of fifty-year-old cognac. " And he thought so much of himself that when an agent who could resuscitate his flagging career said upon meeting him, "May I call you Orson?"
NEWS
February 7, 2016 | Reviewed by Paul Davis
The Letters of Ernest Hemingway Volume 3, 1926-1929 Edited by Rena Sanderson, Sandra Spanier, and Robert W. Trogdon Cambridge University Press. 731 pp. $45. Perhaps no 20th-century writer has had a greater influence than Ernest Hemingway. His novels, short stories, and journalism are penetrating and iconic; his personal life, thinly veiled in his fiction, was the stuff of drama and romance. Hemingway was rich, famous, and beloved by millions of readers worldwide.
NEWS
September 24, 2015 | By Jessica Parks and Laura McCrystal, Inquirer Staff Writers
After a two-year pilot program that segregated DUI cases into a separate court, Montgomery County is reverting to the previous system because of a heavy caseload, court administrator Michael Kehs said. DUI cases in Montgomery County "are between a quarter and a third of our inventory each year," Kehs said. "It simply became too much for one judge to handle. " The county's DUI court was not a treatment court, unlike its drug court and the treatment-based DUI courts in Philadelphia and 12 other Pennsylvania counties.
NEWS
July 29, 2015
YOUR JULY 13 editorial, "To Their Tax Credit . . . " about the Educational Improvement Tax Credit program, ignores the fact that the program provides high-quality educational options for children and families in need. What's more, contrary to the editorial, organizations like the Children's Scholarship Fund Philadelphia provide the very highest levels of accountability when it comes to the funds it receives from donors. As Pennsylvania's largest provider of scholarship support for grades K-8, CSFP serves over 6,200 Philadelphia children in more than 175 schools who receive on average $1,900 per child, per year.
NEWS
July 22, 2015 | BY STEPHANIE FARR, Daily News Staff Writer farrs@phillynews.com, 215-854-4225
IF YESTERDAY'S botched online sale of SEPTA regional-rail passes for the papal visit is any indication of what's in store when it comes to transportation during Pope Francis' visit in September - heaven help us. SEPTA's papal-pass site, which went live at 9 a.m., crashed almost immediately due to high volume. By 10:40 a.m., SEPTA officials had shut down the site and put the sale on hold. Sales will not resume today, but SEPTA is expected to announce today when sales will reopen.
BUSINESS
July 15, 2015 | By Alan J. Heavens, Inquirer Real Estate Writer
In the spring, Philadelphia's single-family housing market had its best quarter in a decade, with prices and sales volume surging throughout the city. The average house value "soared" by 7.3 percent in 2015's second quarter compared with the first three months of the year, said Kevin Gillen, chief economist of Meyers Research and senior research fellow at Drexel University's Lindy Institute for Urban Innovation. Based on single-family home sales data between April 1 and June 30 from the city Recorder of Deeds, Gillen said, the quarterly price rise was the largest since second quarter 2005, at the height of the real estate boom.
BUSINESS
April 30, 2015 | By Alan J. Heavens, Inquirer Real Estate Writer
Winter appears to have put Philadelphia's real estate recovery on ice, as first-quarter sale prices in the city fell 0.3 percent from the fourth-quarter 2014 level. The decline came after two consecutive positive quarters, Kevin Gillen, chief economist at Meyers Research and senior research fellow at Drexel University's Lindy Institute for Urban Innovation, said Tuesday. But Gillen, who analyzed data from the city Recorder of Deeds Office, called the decline "statistically negligible.
NEWS
April 13, 2015 | By Edward Colimore, Inquirer Staff Writer
Through an open door came the sound of labored, heavy breathing and groans as President Abraham Lincoln lay dying from a gunshot wound to the head. First lady Mary Todd Lincoln passed from the room into a hallway, moaning with inconsolable grief, "O, my God, and have I given my husband to die?" The long death vigil at the Petersen House in Washington unfolded before James Tanner, who'd been summoned to record the testimony of witnesses to the assassination at Ford's Theatre. Though not widely known, Tanner's shorthand and transcribed cursive from the night of April 14, 1865, and morning of April 15, 1865, survived and are kept in an acid-free box in a vault at the Union League of Philadelphia.
NEWS
February 18, 2015 | By Susan Snyder, Inquirer Staff Writer
Princeton University on Monday announced its largest gift in history: a rare book and manuscript collection - including the first six printed editions of the Bible - valued at nearly $300 million. The 2,500-volume collection, which includes an original printing of the Declaration of Independence and Beethoven's autographed music sketchbook, has been housed at Princeton's Firestone Library since 1959. That's when alum and Philadelphia native William H. Scheide moved it there from Titusville in Western Pennsylvania, the town where he was reared.
NEWS
April 4, 2014 | BY GARY THOMPSON, Daily News Staff Writer thompsg@phillynews.com, 215-854-5992
ADVOCATES of Danish provocateur Lars von Trier have described his pornographic "Nymphomaniac" movies, a bit hopefully, as scandalous. In fact, there is no scandal. Volume I came and went with barely a peep - on the whole, people would rather see "Noah" - and though Volume I and Volume II (opening today) are hailed as worth talking about, no one is. Perhaps because folks feel they can't get a word in edgewise. Von Trier himself seems to be doing most of the talking, via the desultory narration of his protagonist Joe (Charlotte Gainsbourg)
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