CollectionsVolunteerism
IN THE NEWS

Volunteerism

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
January 14, 2003 | By Larry Atkins
Today's young people don't need Kevin Spacey or Haley Joel Osment to tell them to pay it forward. Despite all of the lamenting about the apathy, narcissism and decline in values and morals of today's young people, there is one sign that contradicts this stereotype. For several years, this generation of young people has been more active in volunteering and giving than perhaps any that came before it. According to figures from the Points of Light Foundation in Washington, 13 million teenagers, or 59 percent of America's teen population, volunteer more than 3.5 hours a week.
NEWS
February 13, 1991 | By Tanya Barrientos, Inquirer Staff Writer
Natisha Walker, a sophomore at Overbrook High School, wasn't confident in her own academic skills when she began tutoring third graders last year. "But then I learned that they need me," she said. "They look up to me. My attitude and my self-confidence have to be straight so if they want to follow in my footsteps they can. " Philadelphia School District officials took Walker, 16, to a news conference yesterday to spotlight a program they hope produces similar experiences for students throughout the city.
NEWS
April 29, 1997 | By Mario Cuomo
What a dazzling array of ideas and proposals made up the extravaganza in Philadelphia called the Presidents' Summit for America's Future! Americans helping Americans out of a deep compassion for the disadvantaged, especially the 15 million children at risk. "A new way of doing business" (in the words of the summit's organizers) that will, by the year 2000, give at least 2 million of these children better health, better education, a better chance at a good job, safer places to live and work, and even better relationships with their parents or mentors.
NEWS
September 13, 1996 | By Marguerite P. Jones, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
The Central Bucks Chamber of Commerce will honor an outstanding teacher with the second annual Tree of Life Award on Nov. 15. The award is for a teacher who promotes volunteerism in students and among the school community. To qualify for the award, the teacher also must volunteer within the community and have a nurturing relationship with students that goes beyond the requirements of his or her job. Teachers may be nominated by peers, students, colleagues, and fellow community members.
NEWS
March 12, 1989 | By Julia M. Klein, Inquirer Staff Writer
Her gnarled and knobby fingers reached out in greeting, and Retta Kirk smiled with an intensity that belied her frailty. The 93-year-old widow of a coal miner who died 25 years ago of black lung, Kirk had grown used to solitude. "I don't visit nobody," she said. "I stay right here alone by myself. . . . I've been by myself for so long it just seems there ain't nobody but me. " It was as much a boast as a complaint. Kirk has a prickly pride in her own self-sufficiency, refusing requests from her surviving children to move in with them.
NEWS
February 4, 1997 | By Robert A. Rankin, INQUIRER WASHINGTON BUREAU
It eases social problems, doesn't cost much, makes people feel good, and everybody likes it. It's volunteerism - voluntary service to your community - and you are going to be hearing a lot about it soon from President Clinton. Clinton will extol the virtues of volunteerism tonight in his State of the Union address. Next, with former President George Bush and retired Gen. Colin L. Powell, Republicans both, he will promote volunteerism at a conference in Philadelphia on April 27-29.
NEWS
May 1, 1997 | By William Raspberry
I could point out that some politicians have been behaving the way reporters are accused of behaving: looking for the dark clouds behind the silver lining of this week's new birth of volunteerism. But even Jesse Jackson praised the Colin Powell-led effort to enlist volunteers in service to America's 15 million at-risk children. Mario Cuomo once again cautioned against the temptation to believe that an army of volunteers will relieve government of its duty to help the poor.
NEWS
April 30, 1997 | By Marc Kaufman, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER Inquirer Staff Writers Monica Yant, Dale Mezzacappa and Rusty Pray contributed to this report
After a final exhortation beneath a crystal-blue sky at Independence Hall, 3,000 weary but enthusiastic delegates and guests at the Presidents' Summit were sent back to communities across the country yesterday as missionaries of a new ethic of volunteer service. First lady Hillary Rodham Clinton bade them farewell with the hope that volunteerism, especially on behalf of children, would become a "habit of the heart" for millions of Americans. Gen. Colin Powell, general chairman of the summit, told the crowd he had a ready rejoinder for any corporate executive reluctant to contribute toward the summit's goal of aiding children.
NEWS
April 28, 1997 | By Christian Davenport, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
A half block from a street corner known to be the turf of drug dealers, in a room where planks stuck out from the wall and wires lay exposed on the ground alongside tools and clumps of dirt, Vincent Miles knew exactly where to find the spirit of the Presidents' Summit on volunteerism. "It's right here," said Miles, program coordinator of the W.C. Atkinson Memorial Resource Center, which provides shelter for about 22 homeless men a night. While volunteers knocked down old walls so that new ones could be erected, Miles toured the building that the center acquired to transform into a halfway house for the recently homeless.
NEWS
September 28, 1997 | By William C. Kashatus
Yesterday the University of Pennsylvania hosted a local initiative called "Philadelphia's Promise. " The aim is to find ways to implement the various ideas raised during last April's volunteerism summit. One of those good ideas - a good idea we should put into action, and soon - is service learning. I realize that many educators and parents have reservations about educational reform. But if implemented wisely, service learning can be a powerful response to student apathy. It's a dynamic way of teaching, perhaps the most effective school reform in recent history.
1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
September 17, 2013 | By Melissa Dribben, Inquirer Staff Writer
The phone rang. Seated at the desk, the petite woman with salt-and-pepper curls took a deep breath and reached for the receiver, game for the challenge. "Hello, Central High School," she said brightly. "May I help you?" She furrowed her brow. "Can you repeat the name?" She followed her finger, poring over the directory of the school's staff and faculty. "Do you know what department he's in? Oh. OK. " Anxious now, she searched the list again, top to bottom, bottom to top, then apologized.
NEWS
January 23, 2013 | By Sulaiman Abdur-Rahman, Inquirer Staff Writer
As two screens projected the Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King Jr.'s "I Have a Dream" speech at Girard College on Monday, a group of Girl Scouts stood alongside a table with an assortment of socks on it. "We want to collect socks and donate them to a local shelter where women stay with their children," said Melissa Theron, troop leader of Philadelphia-based Girl Scout Troop 94503. "Our motto is to help people at all times. That's why this is so special to us. " Theron and her group of 30 Girl Scouts were participating in the Greater Philadelphia Martin Luther King Day of Service during Monday's federal holiday honoring the late civil-rights leader.
NEWS
December 27, 2012 | By Jonathan Lai, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Jewish Santa brought bagels. Joseph Hassman arrived at the Ronald McDonald House of Southern New Jersey in Camden slightly after 9 Christmas morning, bells jingling on his head-to-toe St. Nicholas outfit. Surrounding the family physician turned Santa were six family-member "elves," bringing food for guests in what has become a Hassman clan tradition. "Ho, ho, ho. Merry Christmas!" Hassman, 77, said as he visited three floors of bedrooms, encouraging children and their parents to have "breakfast with Santa.
SPORTS
May 11, 2012 | BY MARK KRAM, Daily News Staff Writer
THE SCHUYLKILL is a sacred place to Jason Read. For as long as he has been rowing, the river has called to him in a special way, not just a place to work out on but an evolving piece of ecology. From the vantage point of his boat, he has seen it change over the years for the better. Only the other the day he happened to see a "turtle the size of watermelon. " New algae are growing. And he sees fish leap from the water that are big, with schools of smaller ones near the banks. Gazing out at the river one chilly morning recently at the Temple boathouse, he said, "The health of the river is improving.
NEWS
June 13, 2011 | By Daniel Rubin, Inquirer Columnist
Ida Odom - a.k.a. Miss Odom or The Granny - has been invited to stand with 25 other seniors at a ceremony Friday in Washington to honor extraordinary volunteerism. Lots of luck getting her there. "I'm not going," she said quietly one day last week at her desk in the back of a second-grade classroom at Toby Farms Elementary School. It's not that the trip to pick up her MetLife Foundation "Older Volunteers Enrich America" award is too arduous for the petite, horn-rimmed 89-year-old widow from Chester.
NEWS
March 6, 2011 | By Jacqueline L. Urgo, Inquirer Staff Writer
OCEAN CITY, N.J. - It was 2004 when Lorraine McCarthy, a full-time resident of this Cape May County resort, sold her duplex a block from the boardwalk and decamped to the mainland. "The choice we made to move off the barrier island was the same choice that a lot of people who wanted to make some money made," said McCarthy, who lives in nearby Upper Township. "It was the best time to sell. " The Jersey Shore's real estate boom, it now seems, had a more profound effect on the region's population than many realized.
NEWS
April 3, 2009 | By Myriam Marquez
I'm driving to work, talking by cell with my son. AmeriCorps, I tell him. Peace Corps. VISTA. In these tough times, if you can't find a real job, there are options that help your community. With pay! "Yeah, yeah, I'm looking into it," the college senior tells me. Times are tough for graduates, and my oldest son is getting antsy. He wants a master's degree but may need to wait and work for a year or two. Many young people are counting on the Obama administration, which wants to expand programs such as AmeriCorps to help young people finance their college education and work in their communities during this catatonic economy.
NEWS
August 12, 2008 | By Matthew Spolar INQUIRER HARRISBURG BUREAU
Faced with a steady decline in the numbers of volunteer firefighters, state lawmakers have been championing legislation to provide greater financial assistance and other incentives to volunteers. As part of this year's budget agreement, Gov. Rendell signed into law a $100 tax credit for volunteers. In June, a group of lawmakers began pushing a package of four bills to help firefighting recruitment efforts, including one by State Sen. Andrew Dinniman (D., Chester). Tom Savage, who runs the Pennsylvania Fire and Emergency Services Institute, pointed out that Rendell's tax credit lasts for only one year, and "that doesn't solve the problem long-term.
1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
|
|
|
|
|