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Vote Fraud

NEWS
November 21, 2000 | By Peggy Noonan
For many years there has been a famous phrase that derives from the 12-step recovery movement. It refers to a thing that is very big, and obvious, and of crucial importance, that people around it refuse for whatever reason to acknowledge. It's called "the elephant in the living room. " There is an elephant in the living room in the Florida story. Actually, it's a donkey. And actually, there are a number of them. When the story of the Florida recounts and hand-counts and court decisions is reported on TV and in the newspapers, the journalists uniformly fail to speak of the donkey in the living room.
NEWS
November 10, 2000 | By Chris Mondics, Emilie Lounsberry and Lenny Savino, INQUIRER STAFF WRITERS
Al Gore's presidential campaign faces high legal hurdles if it sues to overturn Florida's election results, as the campaign warned yesterday it might. And whether the Democrats eventually win or lose in court, the battle there could last for weeks or months, scholars said yesterday. "This is a highly, extraordinarily unusual situation, and who would have ever thought it would have come to this?" said Jeffrey Shaman, a constitutional law expert at DePaul University in Chicago.
NEWS
July 12, 2000 | By Amy S. Rosenberg, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Saying last month's City Council election was "most definitely" stolen from her, ousted Council President Rosalind Norrell-Nance yesterday urged the county prosecutor to indict those responsible for what she alleged was widespread absentee-ballot fraud. "If people didn't know who they voted for, if people did not see a ballot, is that not stealing an election?" Norrell-Nance asked during a news conference at her lawyer's office. At the same time, Norrell-Nance, 50, said she was dropping her court challenge to the election because of the high cost of continuing an investigation into 112 absentee ballots delivered by a messenger at 7:30 the night of the run-off election against Robert L. Johnson.
NEWS
February 1, 2000 | By Clea Benson, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Citing a lack of evidence, a federal judge yesterday dismissed a case alleging that widespread vote fraud rigged the outcome of last year's Democratic primary for the Fifth District City Council seat - the territory that John F. Street represented when he was in Council. The losing candidate, Fairmount real-estate broker Julie Welker, took the case to federal court after losing by only 141 votes on May 18 to Darrell Clarke, a former aide to Street. Clarke is now serving as councilman, representing the Fifth District.
NEWS
January 13, 2000 | By Clea Benson, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
District Attorney Lynne M. Abraham said yesterday that she was ending an investigation into allegations of vote fraud in the Democratic primary election for the Fifth District City Council seat because those who made the allegations have provided no evidence of wrongdoing. Abraham's announcement was the latest setback for Fairmount real estate broker Julie Welker, the candidate who lost the Democratic primary race for John F. Street's old Council seat by 141 votes on May 18. Welker has campaigned vigorously to have the results overturned.
NEWS
October 27, 1999 | By Clea Benson, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
A federal judge yesterday declined to issue an injunction requiring Philadelphia election officials to verify voters' current addresses at the polls Tuesday and to prevent voters who no longer live in the city from casting ballots. Former City Council candidate Julie Welker, who also has a lawsuit pending in federal court alleging that she lost her primary bid because of vote fraud, had petitioned U.S. District Judge Ronald L. Buckwalter asking for the injunction. An attorney for Welker said he would appeal the decision.
NEWS
September 16, 1999
Poor Julie Welker. Here she is, trying to prove vote fraud in her close Democratic primary election loss to Darrell Clarke, and she now finds herself confronting a very powerful political force - one this page has endorsed in the past. No, we're not talking about Clarke's mentor and patron, John Street. We're talking about the National Voter Registration Act, the federal motor-voter law that made it easier for thousands of citizens nationwide to cast a ballot. It also made it tougher to remove voters from the registration rolls.
NEWS
September 15, 1999 | By Clea Benson, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
District Attorney Lynne M. Abraham announced yesterday that she would open a criminal investigation into allegations of vote fraud in the Fifth District City Council primary election. Abraham took the action as a response to a request from Julie Welker, who lost the Democratic nomination for John F. Street's old seat to former Street aide Darrell Clarke. Welker has also filed a federal lawsuit alleging that vote fraud among Street and Clarke supporters cost her the May 18 Democratic primary, an election that is likely to determine the ultimate winner of the seat in the heavily Democratic district.
NEWS
August 26, 1999 | by Michael Hinkelman, Daily News Staff Writer
Philadelphia District Attorney Lynne Abraham said yesterday that any decision about investigating vote fraud allegations in the May Democratic primary will be made only "after a fair and impartial review" by her office. An investigation has been sought by Julie Welker, who lost a close election to Darrell Clarke in the race for City Council's 5th District. However, Welker wanted Abraham to turn the matter over to state Attorney General Mike Fisher. In an Aug. 24 letter to Welker, Abraham said, "The wishes of the person requesting the investigation with regard to where the case should be prosecuted play no role in our decision.
NEWS
August 24, 1999 | by Michael Hinkelman, Daily News Staff Writer
Julie Welker's campaign to get her allegations of election fraud in the 5th Council District primary investigated took a dramatic turn yesterday when she charged that a public housing tenant recently appointed to head a division of the Philadelphia Housing Authority illegally voted in the primary. In a complaint filed yesterday in federal district court in Philadelphia, Welker charged that Jackie V. McDowell voted from an address at 2630 Norris St. in North Philadelphia. In a press conference on Aug. 16 to announce McDowell's appointment, it was revealed that she lived in a three-bedroom rowhouse owned by PHA in West Philadelphia.
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