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Vote Fraud

NEWS
August 19, 1999 | RON CORTES / Inquirer Staff Photographer
Julie Welker speaks at a news conference yesterday outside District Attorney Lynne Abraham's office at 1421 Arch St. Welker, who lost the May 18 Democratic primary for the Fifth District City Council seat to Darrell Clarke, called for a criminal probe into what she contends was vote fraud that cost her the race.
NEWS
August 14, 1999 | By Clea Benson, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Not much has happened in the courtroom, but on paper there's a war of words raging in Julie Welker's federal lawsuit contending that a far-flung vote-fraud conspiracy caused her narrow defeat in the Democratic primary for John F. Street's old City Council seat. Lawyers in the case have been using the slow summer months to lob verbal grenades at each other. As of yesterday, Welker was suing one of her former lawyers for criticizing her conspiracy theory in a public letter; her current attorney was trying to get a city lawyer removed from the case for trying to hire Welker's former handwriting expert; and the city solicitor had filed a motion trying to get Welker's complaint dismissed, saying, among other things, that it "reads more like a supermarket tabloid than a proper legal pleading.
NEWS
July 15, 1999 | By Clea Benson, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Julie Welker, a candidate for John F. Street's old City Council seat in the May 18 Democratic primary, yesterday filed a federal lawsuit alleging that her opponent - Darrell Clarke - and Street's political organization stole the election from her with a conspiracy to commit vote fraud. Welker lost the Democratic nomination for the Fifth District Council seat to Clarke, a former Street aide, by 141 votes. He faces no Republican opposition in the Nov. 2 election. Clarke was out of town on vacation yesterday and could not be reached for comment, but Street, through a spokeswoman, called Welker's allegations "groundless.
NEWS
July 24, 1998
Newt Gingrich and his allies don't have the slightest intention of slashing the special-interest millions that flow mainly to the Republicans these days. But they're posing as reformers, even as they try to kill campaign-finance reform with hundreds of amendments. It's quite a spectacle. In the next batch of GOP amendments will be two presented as deterrents to voter fraud. The catch is that the House is sharply divided over them, with many Democrats concerned that they'd treat racial minorities unfairly.
NEWS
June 23, 1998 | by Gar Joseph, Daily News Staff Writer Staff writer Bob Warner contributed to this report
Political intrigue, in three parts, is the theme of today's Clout page. DA probes ward vote How long has it been since an elected official in Philadelphia was indicted? Too long. But that may change. District Attorney Lynne Abraham is investigating irregularities in the June 8 election of a Democratic ward leader in Kensington's 7th Ward. State Rep. Benjamin Ramos, who lost the election, complained at the time that two imposters were allowed to vote using false credentials.
NEWS
April 3, 1998 | by Gar Joseph, Daily News Staff Writer
Depending on who you talk to, Carlos Matos is either a tough guy who has used intimidation on behalf of the Tartaglione political family or a caring community activist who turned his life around. Matos, 49, was construction director for the Norris Square Economic Development Corp. from 1988 to 1992. He recruited and oversaw the work of neighborhood residents in building and renovating houses, said Patricia DeCarlo, director of the Norris Square Civic Association. Matos also oversaw construction of 21 townhouses in the neighborhood.
NEWS
September 4, 1996 | By John Murphy, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Montgomery County Republican Committee members yesterday accused Elinda Fishman Kiss, Democratic candidate for state representative from the 152d District, of voter fraud, calling for a full investigation into what they say is evidence that she cast votes in Philadelphia and Montgomery County on the same day in seven different elections. "We all know that the 14th Amendment says one man, one vote. Clearly, this person has disregarded that and has disregarded both federal and state election law, if the voting records in Montgomery County and Philadelphia are accurate," said Frank R. Bartle, Montgomery County Republican Committee chairman, during a news conference yesterday afternoon.
NEWS
July 7, 1996
Six months into Pennsylvania's "motor voter" program, which allows people to register to vote while renewing driver's licenses or conducting other business with government, 183,786 people have used it to sign up. That gives the state more registered voters - nearly 6.4 million - than at any time in its history. These statistics are a pleasant postscript to all the wrangling over whether the state would comply with the 1993 federal motor voter law. Pennsylvania joined a small band of renegade states that refused to bring their registration systems into line with the federal act. Critics called "motor voter" an invitation to election fraud.
NEWS
March 17, 1996 | By Craig R. McCoy, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
It was one of the most extensive criminal investigations in the state's history. For months on end, agents of the Attorney General's Office fanned out across North and Northeast Philadelphia, interviewing more than 2,000 people as they sought to unravel the absentee-ballot scandal that briefly put William G. Stinson in the state Senate. Twenty people were charged with vote fraud in the November 1993 election, nine of them committee people. Fourteen were convicted of misdemeanors.
NEWS
March 17, 1996 | By Craig R. McCoy, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
For month after month, state prosecutors tried to climb what one investigator calls "the responsibility ladder" for the notorious 1993 Second District election in Philadelphia, marred by massive absentee-ballot fraud. They never got past the bottom rung. Twenty people were charged with vote fraud, nine of them committee people, the foot soldiers of the political game. But prosecutors were never able to identify a mastermind, or even a key strategist, behind the scandal in William Stinson's state Senate campaign.
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