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Voter Apathy

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NEWS
October 31, 1988 | By Russell E. Eshleman Jr., Inquirer Harrisburg Bureau
In the race for state treasurer, Democrat Catherine Baker Knoll and Republican Philip S. English have more to overcome than each other on Nov. 8. They need to overcome voter apathy about a race in which few people know who the candidates are and even fewer know what it is the state treasurer does. Knoll and English are vying for an office that holds, invests and signs checks for billions of dollars a year. In addition, the treasurer is a member of such organizations as the Delaware River Port Authority and the State Employees' Retirement Board.
NEWS
October 24, 1994 | By Thomas Turcol, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
While Gov. Whitman is starring on the national stage this fall, her political foes back home are pinned down on the streets of Newark and Camden. Whether it is Frank Lautenberg fighting to hold onto his U.S. Senate seat or Cardell Cooper trying to become county executive in Essex County, Democrats across New Jersey are locked in a struggle to defend what little turf they have not surrendered to the Republicans. As elsewhere in the country, Democratic candidates here are fighting voter apathy and an anti-incumbent sentiment fueled by anger with President Clinton and the Democratic-controlled Congress.
NEWS
June 17, 1992 | By Carol Morello, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Anat Michaeli, who finds this year's election campaign alternately boring and revolting, has indulged her 8-year-old daughter's budding interest in democracy by letting her watch the nightly half-hour of political commercials. The child eventually lost interest, too. "Mom, they're not saying anything," she complained before turning the channel to a movie. "I was so proud of her," Michaeli said. "She saw things so clearly. "We have so many problems in this country.
NEWS
October 28, 2004 | By Matthew P. Blanchard INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Voter advocates vowed to end a history of apathy and election shenanigans in Chester City yesterday as they announced that they had registered 3,400 new voters in the city and would deploy lawyers to monitor every polling place on Election Day. "We're going to defend every vote, protect every voter," said Terry Rumsey, who cochairs Delaware County Wage Peace & Justice, an activist group that organized the nonpartisan registration drive. The group held a news conference outside the county voting machine warehouse on 24th Street, delivering a symbolic "Voter Protection Order" to county election workers who were busy loading voting machines onto box trucks for delivery to polling places.
NEWS
November 7, 1999 | By Erika Hobbs, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF Martin Z. Braun, Lauren Mayk and Jon Stenzler of the Inquirer suburban staff contributed to this article
Michael Young, a 48-year-old construction worker from Clayton, never voted when he was a Black Panther. He said he fought the "establishment" through the inflamed politics of the Panthers. Four years ago, though, he settled down with his family in South Jersey, bought a house and voted - for the first time - for the Democratic Party. But soon he found that "nothing changed," and he didn't vote last Tuesday. He said Friday that he did not know when he would vote again. "Voting doesn't make a bit of difference," he said.
NEWS
October 26, 2009 | By Michael Matza INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Eight days out from the Nov. 3 election that will produce a new Philadelphia district attorney for the first time in 19 years, candidates Seth Williams and Michael Untermeyer are not scheduled to debate. More than jousting with each other, they are engaged in individual battles with the city's political demography as their campaigns sweep from Manayunk to Mayfair, from Packer Park in deepest South Philadelphia to Parkwood Manor in the Far Northeast. For Republican Untermeyer, party affiliation is a gargantuan challenge.
NEWS
May 30, 2011
I offer the following thoughts as an unendorsed Republican candidate for Bucks County commissioner who just lost an election in which 88 percent of the eligible voters chose not to vote. The leaders of both the Democrats and the Republicans attributed the lowest turnout of primary voters in recent memory to such things as the weather, apathy, uncontested races, not much opposition, and people not being that unhappy with government. I find this assessment cavalier, condescending, and delusory.
NEWS
October 17, 1996
However much voter apathy there is this presidential season, there's one group of Americans - retirees - that most political pundits expect to turn out, as usual, in good numbers. What's less well known, though, is that this could be a year when more of these older voters participate without turning out - by voting in the comfort of their homes. The 1993 absentee ballot scandal in Philadelphia's Second Senate District showed the absolute need for closer monitoring of the process.
NEWS
February 19, 2006
Right on, Newt! I never thought I could agree with Newt Gingrich, so imagine my surprise when I found myself nodding my head while reading his article in last Sunday's Currents section. Gingrich has shown the No. 1 reason why this country is suffering from such voter apathy. Our candidates do not know how to do anything except sling mud. The people have declared their dislike for this process, but to no avail. Candidates ignore what the people want; and so we, the voters, have started to ignore them.
NEWS
November 14, 2005
IWISH THE BEST to assaulted South Philly High teacher Mark Seghers. All he wanted to do was his job. It's unfortunate that the school principal, Kevin King, showed a lack of compassion for the victim by dismissing the attack as an "isolated incident. " He then showed further impudence by expressing disappointment that Mr. Seghers would leave, calling his decision to depart, rather than stay and endure future beatings, a "shame. " No, what is a shame is that you allow students to run wild in the halls of your school, doing what they please, assaulting staff members and answering to no one. But maybe I'm being a bit harsh.
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NEWS
July 31, 2013
Nominally, New York mayoral candidate Anthony Weiner is running against City Council President Christine Quinn and several others for the Democratic nomination. More essentially, he is taking on the idea that our leaders are subject to any standards whatsoever. Finally, and fortunately, he appears to be losing both contests. A recent poll suggested that voters are at long last abandoning him - along with his own campaign manager, who quit this week. The seemingly one-of-a-kind "sexting" scandal that got Weiner kicked out of Congress two years ago engulfed him a second time last week, when it became clear that he had continued vigorously distributing dirty self-portraits across cyberspace well after he claimed to have begun his atonement.
NEWS
September 18, 2011 | By Karen Heller, Inquirer Columnist
Many is the morning that Pennsylvanians awake and say, "If only we could be more like Nebraska. " Friends, now's our chance! Gov. Corbett, Senate Majority Leader Dominic Pileggi, and other top Harrisburg Republicans want us to follow the lead of Nebraska and Maine, the only states in our land that elect presidents by congressional district rather than the winner-take-all approach we and 47 other states favor. Which to their minds is just greedy, greedy, greedy. Introducing legislation that would change the way we elect presidents months shy of the 2012 election has absolutely nothing - nothing!
NEWS
May 30, 2011
I offer the following thoughts as an unendorsed Republican candidate for Bucks County commissioner who just lost an election in which 88 percent of the eligible voters chose not to vote. The leaders of both the Democrats and the Republicans attributed the lowest turnout of primary voters in recent memory to such things as the weather, apathy, uncontested races, not much opposition, and people not being that unhappy with government. I find this assessment cavalier, condescending, and delusory.
NEWS
May 18, 2011 | By Karen Heller, Inquirer Columnist
Philadelphia, you are getting the government you deserve. Blame it on the rain, the uncontested Democratic mayoral primary, but really, when it comes down to it, blame Tuesday's pathetic turnout on the overwhelming majority of registered voters who couldn't be bothered. "Abysmal," as the vice president of local watchdog group Committee of Seventy, Ellen Kaplan, described the low turnout, which was historic among recent second-term mayoral races, with about 18 percent of all registered Democrats voting for mayor.
NEWS
April 27, 2011 | By CHRIS BRENNAN, brennac@phillynews.com 215-854-5973
The four Democrats who hope to replace City Council President Anna Verna in the 2nd District agreed on one thing at a South Philly recreation center packed with voters - everyone pays too much in taxes in a confusing system that needs reform. They all see money - be it in economic development to create jobs or the rehabilitation of abandoned lots and houses in the district - as a way to solve the city's problems. Real-estate developer Barbara Capozzi said those issues won't be resolved until a larger problem is addressed - voter apathy.
NEWS
May 16, 2010
Given the challenges that will face the next governor, the lack of interest in the race is surprising. Voters are set to go to the polls Tuesday to pick the Democratic and Republican candidates who will face each other in the fall. The voter apathy may stem from the fact that the candidates are uninspiring, and many assume that Attorney General Tom Corbett is going to be the next governor. But this race is too important to tune out. Whoever wins the election will inherit a fiscal mess in Harrisburg.
NEWS
October 26, 2009 | By Michael Matza INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Eight days out from the Nov. 3 election that will produce a new Philadelphia district attorney for the first time in 19 years, candidates Seth Williams and Michael Untermeyer are not scheduled to debate. More than jousting with each other, they are engaged in individual battles with the city's political demography as their campaigns sweep from Manayunk to Mayfair, from Packer Park in deepest South Philadelphia to Parkwood Manor in the Far Northeast. For Republican Untermeyer, party affiliation is a gargantuan challenge.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 1, 2008 | By Carrie Rickey INQUIRER MOVIE CRITIC
Loosely speaking, there are two Kevin Costners. One is the self-effacing schlub of Bull Durham and Tin Cup, a winning loser who carries himself lightly. The other, the self-important somebody of The Postman and Waterworld, whose messianic heavyosity scuttles both films. Swing Vote, a disarming political satire perfectly calibrated to the national mood and to its revitalized star (who also produced), boasts a scruffy Costner as Bud, self-effacing loser. Because of a voter-machine malfunction, Bud can pick the winner of a hung presidential race that all comes down to New Mexico's five electoral-college votes.
NEWS
February 19, 2006
Right on, Newt! I never thought I could agree with Newt Gingrich, so imagine my surprise when I found myself nodding my head while reading his article in last Sunday's Currents section. Gingrich has shown the No. 1 reason why this country is suffering from such voter apathy. Our candidates do not know how to do anything except sling mud. The people have declared their dislike for this process, but to no avail. Candidates ignore what the people want; and so we, the voters, have started to ignore them.
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