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Voter Turnout

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NEWS
May 11, 1994 | by Ron Goldwyn, Daily News Staff Writer Columnist Jill Porter and the Associated Press contributed to this report
The voters, like the sun, went into eclipse yesterday. The sun came out again, but the voters didn't - almost two-thirds of registered Pennsylvanians stayed home rather than help choose nominees for their next governor and legislative offices. In Philadelphia, turnout buoyed by some hot contests for Congress and the Legislature was about the same, but still on the low side: 37 percent of Democrats, 36 percent of Republicans. In the charter-change election, which many voters had trouble finding on the ballot, passions were high but participation low. Barely one-quarter of eligible Philadelphians voted - almost all of them saying no. The lack of interest is nothing new. With the dramatic exception of the 1992 presidential election, voter turnout has been steadily declining for more than a decade.
NEWS
March 27, 1988 | By Patrisia Gonzales, Inquirer Staff Writer
In Camden political parlance, it's called the "sure pop vote," the voters who closely follow education issues and cast their ballots faithfully each school election year - no matter how boring the campaign or how low voter apathy dips. But in this year's Camden school board race, the "sure pop vote" may have company - even though there are no critical issues being bandied about. Camden politicos are predicting an even larger voter turnout this year because of displeasure over a proposed tax increase to fund the district's $97.3 million budget for 1988-99.
NEWS
November 7, 2007 | By CHRIS BRENNAN, brennac@phillynews.com 215-854-5973
At the close of Michael Nutter's campaign, the now-mayor-elect was urging people to vote, not just for him but to send a message to President Bush and to help elect Democrats as judges. Nutter's theme: It's not over. Most voters weren't listening. Seven of 10 registered voters in the city skipped a trip to the polls yesterday, treating the mayor's race as an issue settled in the May Democratic primary when Nutter bested four rivals. With more than 96 percent of the divisions reporting late last night, only 28.7 percent of the city's registered voters cast ballots.
NEWS
October 30, 1988 | By John Ellis, Special to The Inquirer
When Buck Scott looks at Montgomery County, he sees the most affluent, best-educated county in the state, if not the nation. Which is why he calls voter turnout figures "outrageous. " In the November 1984 election, which featured the Ronald Reagan-Walter Mondale presidential race, 82.27 percent of the registered voters in Montgomery County cast ballots, according to election figures at the Board of Elections in Norristown. That percentage was above the state average of 78.2 percent and far above the national average of 59.9 percent.
NEWS
December 8, 1991 | By Jill Morrison, Special to The Inquirer
Officials from Newtown Borough and Tinicum Township showed up at the Bucks County Commissioners meeting Wednesday to be recognized for the way their citizens showed up on Nov. 5. Both municipalities received plaques from the Bucks County Commissioners for producing the county's highest voter turnouts in the recent elections. In Newtown, 71.9 percent of the borough's 2,500 registered voters came to the polls on Nov. 5, the highest turnout of any borough in the county. "This was a great honor," said Newton Borough Council President Frank B. Fabian Jr., who was elected to his third term on the council last month.
NEWS
April 9, 1989 | By John D. Shabe, Special to The Inquirer
All the candidates in the Winslow Township school board elections were disappointed by the low voter turnout in Tuesday's election in which three incumbents easily won re-election. Of the seven candidates running for the three three-year seats, incumbent Janet Mase received the highest vote total with 520. Elwood C. Heggan, the current board president, got 465 votes, and Salvatore Scardino had 380. Also running were Jacqueline L. Smiley (287), Louis A. Sabec (270), Eileen Serzan (189)
NEWS
November 7, 1996 | By Harry F. Rosenthal, ASSOCIATED PRESS Inquirer staff writer Suzanne Sataline contributed to this article
More than half of America's eligible voters stayed home on Election Day, producing the lowest turnout since 1924, when Calvin Coolidge's campaign didn't excite the electorate, either. Chief among the reasons experts cited was President Clinton's near-certain victory. Final national figures were not yet in yesterday, but Curtis Gans, director of the Committee for Study of the American Electorate, said he expected the turnout to be just under 49 percent of eligible voters. That compares with 55 percent in 1992.
NEWS
May 20, 1986 | By MARIA GALLAGHER and SCOTT HEIMER, Daily News Staff Writers (Staff writers Susan Bennett and Bob Grotevant and the Associated Press contributed to this report.)
A mostly light voter turnout, under a steady drizzle, appeared to be in the making for today's Pennsylvania Primary Election. "The turnout has been rather light thus far," said Frederick L. Voight, executive secretary of the Committee of 70, a political watchdog group. "The rain may have something to do with that, but it's not really unpleasant, not heavy rain, so perhaps the turnout will pick up as the day progresses. " Voigt said the committee had had no reports of significant voter problems by early afternoon.
NEWS
September 22, 2010 | By Jonathan S. Landay and Dion Nissenbaum, McClatchy Newspapers
KABUL, Afghanistan - Internal reports from Afghanistan's Independent Election Commission on Tuesday provide new evidence of serious fraud in Afghanistan's parliamentary elections, including turnouts that exceeded 100 percent in many southeastern districts under the control of the Taliban or other extremists. One district in Paktika province recorded 626 percent voter turnout, according to reports obtained by McClatchy Newspapers. Also Tuesday, the worst helicopter crash in four years killed nine people, bringing NATO fatalities in Afghanistan in 2010 to 529 and making it the deadliest year since the war began in 2001.
NEWS
November 11, 1990 | By Peter Finn, Special to The Inquirer
For months, New Jersey residents have been angry about taxes. But on Tuesday that anger didn't drive an unusually high number of voters to polling booths to register their protests. According to the state Division of Elections, just 52 percent of New Jersey's 3.7 million registered voters showed up at polling booths Tuesday, the lowest turnout in an election with a U.S. Senate seat at the top of the ticket since the state began recording statewide turnout in 1920. Yet turnout in New Jersey was considerably higher than nationwide.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
November 6, 2013 | By Bob Warner, Inquirer Staff Writer
Tuesday's general election is shaping up as a chance for Philadelphia voters to prove cynics wrong - by showing up at the city's 1,687 polling places in large numbers. Trouble is, no one really expects that to happen. With only one statewide judicial contest on the ballot and routine-looking reelection bids by two city officeholders, District Attorney Seth Williams and Controller Alan Butkovitz, most authorities are predicting extremely light turnout among Philadelphia's one million-odd registered voters, perhaps somewhere around 10 percent.
NEWS
May 22, 2013 | By Bob Warner, Inquirer Staff Writer
It may come as a surprise to many Pennsylvania voters, but Tuesday is primary election day, with balloting to choose party candidates for judgeships and a variety of local offices throughout the state's 67 counties. In Philadelphia, the marquee race is a three-way contest for city controller between incumbent Alan Butkovitz, who has held the post as the city's financial watchdog the last eight years, and challengers Brett Mandel and Mark Zecca. The city's voters will also be nominating candidates for six vacant judgeships on Common Pleas Court, three on Municipal Court, and three more on Traffic Court, where a ticket-fixing scandal has spurred legislative efforts to abolish the court before any more judges can be seated.
NEWS
May 9, 2013 | By Hope Yen, Associated Press
WASHINGTON - Making history, America's blacks voted at higher rates than whites in 2012, lifting Democrat Barack Obama to victory amid voter apathy, particularly among young people, new census data show. Despite increasing population, the number of white voters declined for the first time since 1996. Blacks were the only race or ethnic group to show an increase in voter turnout in November, most notably in the Midwest and Southeast, the Census Bureau said Wednesday. The analysis, based on a sample survey of voters last year, is viewed as the best source of government data on turnout by race and ethnicity.
NEWS
March 6, 2013
THE GOOD NEWS: Voters will not - repeat, not - be required to show ID in the May 21 primary. The two sides in the long-running suit over Pennsylvania's voter-ID law have agreed that voter ID will not be enforced during in the primary. The bad news: Unfortunately, that does not mean an end to this case, under legal challenge since the Legislature passed the voter-ID law last spring. It remains under review in Commonwealth Court. A full hearing on the merits won't be until July 15 and any decision, pro or con, will likely be appealed to the state Supreme Court.
NEWS
February 26, 2013 | By Sophia Tareen, Associated Press
CHICAGO - Candidates for Jesse Jackson Jr.'s former congressional seat made their final push for votes Monday ahead of a high-stakes primary, but turnout was expected to be paltry despite the lurid headlines surrounding the disgraced Chicago Democrat and millions in outside super PAC money driven largely by the guns debate. The front-runners - former state Rep. Robin Kelly, former U.S. Rep. Debbie Halvorson, and Chicago Alderman Anthony Beale - made a flurry stops at train stations, strip malls, and diners all over the district that spans Chicago's South Side, south suburbs, and some rural areas.
NEWS
January 28, 2013 | By Claudia Vargas, Inquirer Staff Writer
The Camden County Board of Elections is searching for bilingual poll workers to help the area's growing number of Latinos cast their ballots in the June primary. But how many are needed is an informed guess, determined by surveying names of registered voters rather than querying them in advance or analyzing census data. In November, Camden County joined six other New Jersey counties required to provide Spanish-language materials at all polls rather than just in selected precincts.
NEWS
November 27, 2012
In the hopes of increasing voter turnout, a New Jersey state senator wants to encourage democracy by opening the polls 15 days before an election. By contrast, Pennsylvania is still stuck in a battle to limit civic engagement with an exclusionary voter-ID law that may be enforced by the courts in future elections. In mid-December, Commonwealth Judge Robert E. Simpson Jr. is set to revisit his decision upholding Harrisburg's restrictive voter-ID law. Don't think that the law is dead just because he halted its implementation for the Nov. 6 election.
NEWS
November 9, 2012 | By Miriam Hill, Jonathan Lai, and Andrew Seidman, Inquirer Staff Writers
Some Philadelphia neighborhoods outdid themselves in Tuesday's presidential election. In a city where President Obama received more than 85 percent of the votes, in some places he received almost every one. In 13 Philadelphia wards, Obama received 99 percent of the vote or more. Those wards, many with large African American populations, also swung heavily for Obama over John McCain in 2008. But the difficult economy seemed destined to dampen that enthusiasm four years later. Not to worry.
NEWS
November 8, 2012 | By Jacqueline L. Urgo, Inquirer Staff Writer
SHIP BOTTOM, N.J. - In an unheated municipal hall on sea-washed Long Beach Island on Tuesday, a long line of exhausted, unbated, hungry voters who said they felt like captives in their hometown embodied the most eloquent and famous lines from "The New Colossus": "Give me your tired, your poor, "Your huddled masses yearning to breathe free, "The wretched refuse of your teeming shore. " Afraid to cross the bridge to "civilization" in neighboring Stafford Township - even to replenish dwindling food supplies or use a friend's shower - because officials would not let them return to the island, they came to vote as they were.
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