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Voter Turnout

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NEWS
May 11, 1994 | by Ron Goldwyn, Daily News Staff Writer Columnist Jill Porter and the Associated Press contributed to this report
The voters, like the sun, went into eclipse yesterday. The sun came out again, but the voters didn't - almost two-thirds of registered Pennsylvanians stayed home rather than help choose nominees for their next governor and legislative offices. In Philadelphia, turnout buoyed by some hot contests for Congress and the Legislature was about the same, but still on the low side: 37 percent of Democrats, 36 percent of Republicans. In the charter-change election, which many voters had trouble finding on the ballot, passions were high but participation low. Barely one-quarter of eligible Philadelphians voted - almost all of them saying no. The lack of interest is nothing new. With the dramatic exception of the 1992 presidential election, voter turnout has been steadily declining for more than a decade.
NEWS
March 27, 1988 | By Patrisia Gonzales, Inquirer Staff Writer
In Camden political parlance, it's called the "sure pop vote," the voters who closely follow education issues and cast their ballots faithfully each school election year - no matter how boring the campaign or how low voter apathy dips. But in this year's Camden school board race, the "sure pop vote" may have company - even though there are no critical issues being bandied about. Camden politicos are predicting an even larger voter turnout this year because of displeasure over a proposed tax increase to fund the district's $97.3 million budget for 1988-99.
NEWS
November 7, 2007 | By CHRIS BRENNAN, brennac@phillynews.com 215-854-5973
At the close of Michael Nutter's campaign, the now-mayor-elect was urging people to vote, not just for him but to send a message to President Bush and to help elect Democrats as judges. Nutter's theme: It's not over. Most voters weren't listening. Seven of 10 registered voters in the city skipped a trip to the polls yesterday, treating the mayor's race as an issue settled in the May Democratic primary when Nutter bested four rivals. With more than 96 percent of the divisions reporting late last night, only 28.7 percent of the city's registered voters cast ballots.
NEWS
October 30, 1988 | By John Ellis, Special to The Inquirer
When Buck Scott looks at Montgomery County, he sees the most affluent, best-educated county in the state, if not the nation. Which is why he calls voter turnout figures "outrageous. " In the November 1984 election, which featured the Ronald Reagan-Walter Mondale presidential race, 82.27 percent of the registered voters in Montgomery County cast ballots, according to election figures at the Board of Elections in Norristown. That percentage was above the state average of 78.2 percent and far above the national average of 59.9 percent.
NEWS
December 8, 1991 | By Jill Morrison, Special to The Inquirer
Officials from Newtown Borough and Tinicum Township showed up at the Bucks County Commissioners meeting Wednesday to be recognized for the way their citizens showed up on Nov. 5. Both municipalities received plaques from the Bucks County Commissioners for producing the county's highest voter turnouts in the recent elections. In Newtown, 71.9 percent of the borough's 2,500 registered voters came to the polls on Nov. 5, the highest turnout of any borough in the county. "This was a great honor," said Newton Borough Council President Frank B. Fabian Jr., who was elected to his third term on the council last month.
NEWS
April 9, 1989 | By John D. Shabe, Special to The Inquirer
All the candidates in the Winslow Township school board elections were disappointed by the low voter turnout in Tuesday's election in which three incumbents easily won re-election. Of the seven candidates running for the three three-year seats, incumbent Janet Mase received the highest vote total with 520. Elwood C. Heggan, the current board president, got 465 votes, and Salvatore Scardino had 380. Also running were Jacqueline L. Smiley (287), Louis A. Sabec (270), Eileen Serzan (189)
NEWS
November 7, 1996 | By Harry F. Rosenthal, ASSOCIATED PRESS Inquirer staff writer Suzanne Sataline contributed to this article
More than half of America's eligible voters stayed home on Election Day, producing the lowest turnout since 1924, when Calvin Coolidge's campaign didn't excite the electorate, either. Chief among the reasons experts cited was President Clinton's near-certain victory. Final national figures were not yet in yesterday, but Curtis Gans, director of the Committee for Study of the American Electorate, said he expected the turnout to be just under 49 percent of eligible voters. That compares with 55 percent in 1992.
NEWS
May 20, 1986 | By MARIA GALLAGHER and SCOTT HEIMER, Daily News Staff Writers (Staff writers Susan Bennett and Bob Grotevant and the Associated Press contributed to this report.)
A mostly light voter turnout, under a steady drizzle, appeared to be in the making for today's Pennsylvania Primary Election. "The turnout has been rather light thus far," said Frederick L. Voight, executive secretary of the Committee of 70, a political watchdog group. "The rain may have something to do with that, but it's not really unpleasant, not heavy rain, so perhaps the turnout will pick up as the day progresses. " Voigt said the committee had had no reports of significant voter problems by early afternoon.
NEWS
November 6, 2015 | Wendy Ruderman & Mensah M. Dean, Daily News Staff Writers
MAYOR NUTTER had a lot to say yesterday about Election Day turnout, characterizing the 26 percent voter participation as "a disgrace. " But Nutter directed much of his frustration not at voters, but at City Commissioner Chairman Anthony Clark, who skated to re-election victory on Tuesday without breaking a sweat. In the months leading up to the election, Clark was dogged by media reports that he was a no-show at his City Hall office and he failed to vote, even though a big part of his job, for which he gets paid about $139,000, is to encourage voter participation.
NEWS
November 11, 1990 | By Peter Finn, Special to The Inquirer
For months, New Jersey residents have been angry about taxes. But on Tuesday that anger didn't drive an unusually high number of voters to polling booths to register their protests. According to the state Division of Elections, just 52 percent of New Jersey's 3.7 million registered voters showed up at polling booths Tuesday, the lowest turnout in an election with a U.S. Senate seat at the top of the ticket since the state began recording statewide turnout in 1920. Yet turnout in New Jersey was considerably higher than nationwide.
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NEWS
January 5, 2016 | By Chris Brennan, Inquirer Columnist
The April 26 Democratic primary election for Pennsylvania attorney general is shaping up to be a classic East-vs.-West political battle for the state. And "up-ballot" contests - maybe for president, definitely for the U.S. Senate - could influence the outcome of the race. This race already promised to be attention-grabbing because the incumbent attorney general, Democrat Kathleen Kane, is headed to trial, accused of leaking secret grand jury information to the Daily News. She has not said whether she will seek a second term in office.
NEWS
November 6, 2015 | Chris Brennan and Claudia Vargas, Inquirer Staff Writers
It was the best of elections for Jim Kenney. It was the worst of turnouts for Philadelphia voters. Kenney, a Democrat who left 23 years on City Council behind to run for mayor, won Tuesday's general election with a record-busting 85.39 percent of the vote, with 99.47 percent of the ballots tallied as of Wednesday. But voter turnout was just 25.62 percent for all the races on the ballot, and even lower, 23.7 percent, in the mayor's race - two historically low numbers for an election with an open seat in the mayor's office.
NEWS
November 6, 2015 | Wendy Ruderman & Mensah M. Dean, Daily News Staff Writers
MAYOR NUTTER had a lot to say yesterday about Election Day turnout, characterizing the 26 percent voter participation as "a disgrace. " But Nutter directed much of his frustration not at voters, but at City Commissioner Chairman Anthony Clark, who skated to re-election victory on Tuesday without breaking a sweat. In the months leading up to the election, Clark was dogged by media reports that he was a no-show at his City Hall office and he failed to vote, even though a big part of his job, for which he gets paid about $139,000, is to encourage voter participation.
NEWS
November 6, 2015 | By Andrew Seidman, Inquirer Trenton Bureau
Voter turnout Tuesday in New Jersey was the lowest for a general election in state history, according to unofficial results and an analysis by a polling expert. Against that backdrop, Democrats, who control both chambers of the Legislature, expanded their majority in the Assembly by as many as four seats. Democrats sought to portray their gains as an indictment of Republican Gov. Christie, while the GOP argued it was up against a behemoth of a special-interest group that spent millions of dollars raised by the state's largest teachers' union.
NEWS
October 16, 2015
ISSUE | THE MILITARY Exposed to burn pits I am a retired U.S. Army reservist, and like the veterans in Sunday's story ("Did open-air burn pits sicken vets?"), I was recently denied compensation by the Department of Veterans Affairs. During Operation Desert Storm, I served in northern Saudi Arabia near the neutral zone. Documentation exists that we were exposed to burn pits as well as sarin gas and petroleum fires. Sandstorms occurred almost daily. As a reservist, I don't have a trail of military medical records, which makes it easier for VA to deny my claim.
NEWS
June 13, 2015 | Claudia Vargas, Inquirer Staff Writer
Philadelphia's millennial population is good at registering to vote. But getting to the polls and pushing the button? Not so much. Data from the city's May 19 primary show that while 321,342 Philadelphians between ages 18 and 34 were registered, only 38,686 voted. That's 12 percent, according to an analysis by City Commissioner Al Schmidt. Schmidt, one of the three commissioners who oversee city elections, found what pols and political scientists have seen in U.S. elections for years: the older the voter, the more likely he or she is to vote.
NEWS
May 21, 2015 | By Anthony R. Wood and Mark Fazlollah, Inquirer Staff Writers
Despite an intensely contested Philadelphia mayoral campaign and a state Supreme Court race with historic overtones, party workers throughout the region Tuesday were fretting over an absent majority. Nonvoters evidently far outnumbered the voters, and final turnout figures likely would be low even for an off-year primary. Philadelphians were choosing a Democratic nominee and likely successor to the two-term Mayor Nutter. And the high court - which could rule on redistricting, death-penalty, and fracking cases - had three vacancies for the first time in more than 300 years.
NEWS
November 20, 2014 | By Chris Hepp, Inquirer Staff Writer
Mayor Nutter's former spokesman Doug Oliver is running for mayor himself - maybe. Or so it seemed Tuesday with the announcement that Oliver, who now directs communications for the Philadelphia Gas Works, has formed a committee as part of what he called a "grassroots exploratory process" for the 2015 mayor's race. The committee, named DO2015, will first and foremost try to determine what voters want from their next mayor, Oliver said, and what it will take to increase voter turnout.
NEWS
November 14, 2014
A graphic accompanying an article in Thursday's Inquirer about voter turnout in the Nov. 4 election contained incorrect voter numbers for New Jersey. In Camden County, 113,880 voters cast ballots, or 31.2 percent of the 364,500 who were eligible; in Burlington, 121,829 voters of 292,500, 41.6 percent, and Gloucester, 74,748 of 196,400, 38.1 percent.
NEWS
November 4, 2014 | BY CHRIS BRENNAN, Daily News Staff Writer brennac@phillynews.com, 215-854-5973
PRESIDENT Obama came to the one place in Pennsylvania where he is still popular - Philadelphia - to stump yesterday for Tom Wolf's campaign for governor. Gov. Corbett, seeking a second term but trailing Wolf by double-digits in many polls, probably wishes Obama tried his luck in any other part of the state. Obama's approval rating is 51 percent in Philadelphia, according to last Wednesday's Daily News /Franklin & Marshall College Poll. His disapproval rating with registered voters in northeast, southwest, northwest and central Pennsylvania ranges from 73 percent to 76 percent.
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