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Voting Machine

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NEWS
October 28, 2011 | By James Osborne and Maya Rao, Inquirer Staff Writers
When the returns came in for the Cumberland County Democratic Committee last summer, Cynthia Zirkle couldn't believe what she was seeing. Only 86 votes were cast in the race to represent her district in Fairfield Township, and despite assurances from dozens of friends, Zirkle and her husband, Ernest, had managed to win just 19 votes between them. "I can't believe that's correct," Zirkle told her husband, a retired veterinarian and the town's deputy mayor. The couple sued the Cumberland County Board of Elections and discovered that due to a programming error, their results had been switched with those of their opponents.
NEWS
July 5, 1992 | By Rob Wingate, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Weary of long lines at the polls on Election Day, the Montgomery County commissioners are considering replacing the county's lever-pull voting machines with electronic versions. The county's 40-year-old machines proved incapable of handling the lengthy ballots of April's primary. The problem forced election workers to place Republican ballots on separate machines from Democratic ballots, causing many Republicans to wait in long lines to vote, because there are more Republicans in the county than Democrats.
NEWS
April 10, 1987 | By Kitty Dumas, Inquirer Staff Writer
What is believed to be a voting-machine malfunction in a Collingswood school district may require a second vote on the school board's $11 million budget, according to Collingswood School District Superintendent Adam Pfeffer. The budget, approved in Tuesday's election, called for the local tax rate to increase 17 cents, to $1.73 per $100 of assessed valuation. According to Pfeffer, a machine at Sharp Elementary School malfunctioned. He said last night that the election of school-board members Louis Cappelli, Irene Genther and H. Ian Wachstein to three-year terms was not affected.
NEWS
June 10, 1991 | by Ron Goldwyn, Daily News Staff Writer
A day at the voting machine warehouse - designed to settle all doubts about the May 21 primary - has left a few questions after all. Democrat Daniel McElhatton said yesterday his lead over William Stinson for 7th Council District nomination is now 11 votes. Stinson's lawyer says the lead is eight votes. And a source at the Board of Elections, which monitored the process Saturday, said McElhatton's margin appears to be three votes. The Board of Elections - three Common Pleas judges sitting in for the elected commissioners, who are candidates themselves - is due to certify the primary results today.
NEWS
November 7, 2012 | By Angela Couloumbis, INQUIRER HARRISBURG BUREAU
The central Pennsylvania voting machine shown Tuesday in a YouTube video recording a vote for President Obama as a vote for Republican challenger Mitt Romney was broken and has been fixed, a state official said. The video, reminiscent of a 2008 parody on The Simpsons, went viral and attracted national media attention as it raised concerns about voting-machine fraud. YouTube user "centralpavote," who posted the video, wrote that when he tried to cast a ballot for Obama, the light in the voting booth lit up for Romney.
NEWS
October 27, 1989 | By Connie O'Kane, Special to The Inquirer
Attorneys for Democratic gubernatorial candidate James J. Florio are challenging the way election officials throughout the state handle voting- machine breakdowns. In a suit filed Wednesday in Burlington County Superior Court, Florio's attorneys contend the state lacks uniform procedures for dealing with emergency ballots, the paper forms that are distributed when a voting machine breaks down. The suit names the superintendents of elections in 17 of the state's 21 counties as defendants.
NEWS
December 16, 1993 | By Robert Moran, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
R. Bruce Downing, who is under investigation by the state Attorney General's Office for possible conflicts involving his position as Delaware County's election chief, resigned Tuesday. "We received a letter from him (Tuesday) . . . a very brief letter which said that he was, with regret, resigning from his position immediately," County Councilman Ward T. Williams said yesterday. "As far as I know, no member of council, or anyone else, urged him to do it," Williams said. "I think it was purely voluntary on his part.
NEWS
April 17, 1994 | By Jere Downs, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
The May 10 primary will mark the last time that every voter who goes to the polls in Montgomery County casts a ballot by pulling a lever on an old, gray 800-pound voting machine. "It is about time we got rid of these dinosaurs," said Michael H. McAdoo, chief clerk of the Montgomery County Board of Elections. At its weekly meeting Thursday, the county Board of Commissioners welcomed a leaner, meaner electronic voting machine, authorizing the $3.9 million purchase of computerized voting equipment.
NEWS
February 25, 2000 | By Marc Levy, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
Burlington County officials have decided not to rehire a voting-machine service company in an effort to avoid publicity associated with money-laundering and corruption charges in Louisiana against the firm's owner, a company official said yesterday. Gary Plummer, office manager for Independent Voting Machine Service Co. of Marlton, said Burlington County's superintendent of elections, Nancy Jeffers, telephoned this month to tell him the county wanted to distance itself from the charges in Louisiana.
NEWS
November 20, 1994 | By Mark Fazlollah, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
In last year's general election, Philadelphia voters had little to draw them to the polls. An uninspired state Supreme Court contest, a handful of judgeships, and a single state Senate seat were just about the only races on the ballot. Only one in four voters bothered to show up. Still, Philadelphia managed to spend $184,247 in overtime for the private mechanics who prepared and maintained the voting machines before and on Election Day. Two weeks ago, the stakes were much greater.
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NEWS
January 15, 2016 | By Julie Shaw, Staff Writer
Three former Philadelphia elections officials pleaded guilty Wednesday in Common Pleas Court to misdemeanor charges of violating the state's election code and were each sentenced to one year of probation. Under a plea deal, felony fraud charges were dropped against Robin Trainor, 56; Laura Murtaugh, 57; and Cheryl Ali, also 57. Trainor served as the judge of elections in Juniata Park's 33d Ward, Fifth Division. Murtaugh was the minority election inspector in that division. Ali served as a voting machine inspector in Point Breeze's 36th Ward.
NEWS
May 20, 2015 | By Mark Fazlollah, Inquirer Staff Writer
As he has done for election after election, District Attorney Seth Williams promised Monday that his team of prosecutors will protect the sanctity of the vote in Philadelphia. This year he also announced that arrest warrants were issued Monday for four election officials in the 18th Ward, 1st Division on charges of fraudulently adding six votes by tampering with voting machines at North Philadelphia's Hancock Recreation Center, 1401 N. Hancock St., during the 2014 general election.
NEWS
November 4, 2014 | By Aubrey Whelan, Inquirer Staff Writer
District Attorney Seth Williams on Monday announced the creation of a task force aimed at combating election-day fraud. The Election Fraud Task Force will specially assign assistant district attorneys and detectives to investigate election fraud allegations, instead of handling them "based on where and when the complaints came into the office," Williams said in a statement. "For far too long, it has been assumed that election day in Philadelphia involves inappropriate actions at the polls.
NEWS
October 10, 2014 | By Julia Terruso, Inquirer Staff Writer
In a New Jersey congressional district dominated by Democrats since the Bicentennial, Republican Garry Cobb is stressing one point over and over: He's not Donald Norcross. The former Eagles player's push against the status quo was the overarching theme in the First District candidates' joint interview Wednesday with the Inquirer Editorial Board. Norcross, a Democratic state senator from Camden County, touted a lengthy record and said he, not a political machine, claims sole ownership of it. "Clearly, he's a product of the machine.
NEWS
November 7, 2013 | By Chris Brennan
CLOUT, HAVING just suffered through another "off-year" election season, looked hopefully with help to the future yesterday. We canvassed more than 20 politicians and asked them to ponder three political questions: 1. Who will win the 2014 Democratic primary for governor? 2. Who will win the 2015 Democratic primary for mayor? 3. What will Mayor Nutter do when his second term ends? Our top 10 answers were: * District Attorney Seth Williams (who won a second term yesterday)
NEWS
November 7, 2012 | By Angela Couloumbis, INQUIRER HARRISBURG BUREAU
The central Pennsylvania voting machine shown Tuesday in a YouTube video recording a vote for President Obama as a vote for Republican challenger Mitt Romney was broken and has been fixed, a state official said. The video, reminiscent of a 2008 parody on The Simpsons, went viral and attracted national media attention as it raised concerns about voting-machine fraud. YouTube user "centralpavote," who posted the video, wrote that when he tried to cast a ballot for Obama, the light in the voting booth lit up for Romney.
NEWS
April 17, 2012 | By Bob Warner, Inquirer Staff Writer
Philadelphia city commissioners are investigating an unusual series of over-votes in last year's primary election - 83 voting divisions citywide where the official vote totals were bigger than the recorded number of voters who showed up. In most locations, the discrepancies were small, just a handful of votes. In many instances, minor procedural mistakes could account for the anomalies. But so far, the bulk of the over-voting has not been explained. Until they understand what happened, the commissioners say, they cannot rule out the possibility of deliberate, illegal efforts to run up votes for favored candidates, with the perpetrators losing count as they tried to cover their tracks.
NEWS
February 17, 2012 | By Edith M. Lederer, Associated Press
UNITED NATIONS - The General Assembly voted overwhelmingly Thursday for a resolution backing an Arab League plan calling for Syrian President Bashar al-Assad to step down and condemning human-rights violations by his regime. The vote in the 193-member world body on the Arab-sponsored resolution was 137-12 with 17 abstentions. Several countries complained afterward that they were unable to vote due to problems with the voting machine. Supporters were hoping for a high "yes" vote to deliver a strong message to Assad to immediately stop the bloody crackdown that has killed more than 5,400 people and to hand power to his vice president.
NEWS
October 28, 2011 | By James Osborne and Maya Rao, Inquirer Staff Writers
When the returns came in for the Cumberland County Democratic Committee last summer, Cynthia Zirkle couldn't believe what she was seeing. Only 86 votes were cast in the race to represent her district in Fairfield Township, and despite assurances from dozens of friends, Zirkle and her husband, Ernest, had managed to win just 19 votes between them. "I can't believe that's correct," Zirkle told her husband, a retired veterinarian and the town's deputy mayor. The couple sued the Cumberland County Board of Elections and discovered that due to a programming error, their results had been switched with those of their opponents.
NEWS
February 28, 2009
New Jersey officials promised years ago to retrofit the state's beleaguered electronic voting machines with verifiable paper records. But now that lawmakers have put off the implausible project for a third time, it looks more than ever like a figment of the political imagination. State officials say they don't have the roughly $20 million needed to fix the machines in the current climate. They're probably right. But if they ever do come up with the money, they should use it to buy new machines instead.
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