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Voting Machines

NEWS
November 13, 1997 | By Tom Infield, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Election officials and members of City Council renewed their call for new voting machines yesterday, saying that the 600- to 1,000-pound contraptions now in use are outdated, cranky and prone to breakdown. Councilman Michael A. Nutter said he hoped residents could decide by referendum as soon as May to replace mechanical machines with electronic models. He said he hoped some voters could begin using them by 2000. The cost: $19 million to $21 million. "We are decades behind in the new wave of voting machines.
NEWS
October 17, 2000 | By Kristin E. Holmes, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Attorneys for Montgomery County are scheduled to begin arguments tomorrow in a civil lawsuit seeking $4.3 million in damages from an Indiana company for supplying voting machines that broke down during elections, resulting in long lines at the polls and questionable vote tallies. The county is suing the MicroVote Corp., which sold the county 900 electronic voting machines in 1994 as the county updated its 50-year-old lever voting system. During the November 1995 election, some of the new machines jammed, computer software failed, and some residents left their polling places without voting, frustrated because of hours spent waiting in line.
NEWS
February 2, 1996 | By Rena Singer, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Inside Montgomery County voting booths come spring, the public may find neither the $4 million problem-plagued electronic machines that marred November's election nor the standard manual machines used without incident for decades. Instead, the April 23 primary may mark a return to a simpler time: Voters may be casting ballots using plain pencil and paper. That's one of the options the Montgomery County commissioners will consider this week as they decide how to ensure that the coming election does not bring the chaos the last election did. In November, about 145 of the county's 900 new MicroVote Corp.
NEWS
February 2, 1996 | By Rita Giordano, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
More than a year after being criticized for spending too much money on voting machines, the City Commissioners' office continued its lavish spending with little oversight, according to a new audit by the City Controller. In a survey of five cities and one county, the controller found that Philadelphia outspent them all on labor. For the fiscal year that ended June 30, 1995, the department that oversees city elections, the City Commissioners' office, spent about $882,000 in labor costs for maintaining voting machines at $244 per machine.
NEWS
December 8, 2005 | By Dana Reddington INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Some Bucks County residents will get a chance to try out three new voting machines today as counties approach a federal deadline to update their systems. That deadline, though, is not quite as pressing as county officials thought. The federal Help America Vote Act, passed in 2002 in response to problems in the 2000 presidential election, requires counties to replace outdated voting machines. Bucks County had been working to choose a new system by Dec. 31 to comply with the law. But Commissioner James F. Cawley said yesterday the county learned late Monday that counties only need to commit to funding a new system by that date.
NEWS
November 14, 2000 | By Ken Dilanian, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Aides to Republican House Majority Leader John M. Perzel were smiling yesterday as an unofficial vote count doubled Perzel's election lead over challenger Mark J. Chilutti, while Democrats held out hope that mistakes would be discovered when the voting machines are opened next week. In Philadelphia's more sedate version of Florida's presidential recount frenzy, lawyers and partisans of both candidates spent several hours gathered around tables in the City Commissioners' Office at Delaware Avenue and Spring Garden Street, sorting through ballots and tally sheets.
NEWS
November 9, 2007 | By Jan Hefler INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
New Jersey's attorney general yesterday asked a judge to open eight Camden County voting machines whose votes were not retrieved by poll workers after the election Tuesday. Camden County election officials had said they would ignore any votes cast on the machines, which poll workers mishandled on election night, for now. But after The Inquirer raised questions about that decision, Attorney General Anne Milgram's office yesterday petitioned Superior Court to open the machines and keep any votes from being disregarded.
NEWS
April 29, 1997 | By Douglas Herbert, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Whenever Patricia Fowler explains to someone that she makes her living gearing up voting machines for election day, she draws an accustomed - and unenlightened - reaction. "People look at me and go, 'How much time can that take?' " Fowler said yesterday. For the record, about 10 weeks of frantic work in the spring and eight in the fall, followed by months of post-election wind-down. Since March 17, Fowler has led a crack team of 10 full-time employees through a grueling, greasy regimen aimed at cranking up Delaware County's 722 lever-operated ballot booths for the primary election May 20. The county is one of three in Southeastern Pennsylvania - Bucks and Philadelphia are the others - that have stuck with the lever-style machines while others have opted for the higher-tech or lower-weight punch-card or electronic-balloting machines.
NEWS
November 2, 2000 | By Kristin E. Holmes, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
A federal court jury yesterday awarded Montgomery County $1,048,500 in damages from the Indiana company that supplied voting machines that malfunctioned during the November 1995 election, causing long lines at the polls, frustrated voters, and questionable voting results. The jury found that MicroVote Corp., a voting-machine distribution company, had breached a portion of the warranty in its contract with the county, and based the award of damages on that finding. The company did not breach its contract or commit fraud, the jury found.
NEWS
November 6, 1996 | By Karen E. Quinones Miller, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER Inquirer correspondents Laura Barnhardt and John Murphy contributed to this article
Montgomery County officials breathed a sigh of relief last night after the county's new voting machines handily passed their first Election Day test. Last November, county officials were overwhelmed by problems at the polls and complaints from voters. Yesterday, there was none of that. "We were worried, of course; we were apprehensive," said Montgomery County Commissioner Mario Mele. Widespread problems "would have been an embarrassment to the county, and an additional source of frustration to Montgomery County residents.
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