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Voting Rights

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
April 27, 2002 | By E.R. SHIPP
A RIDICULOUS BIT of misinformation has been floating out there for a while, resistant to repeated shots of the truth - Congress must act in 2007 to preserve voting rights for blacks. As best I can figure, the beginning of a mass hysteria that has had blacks fearing a return to slavery or whatever state of civic existence they had before the adoption of the Civil Rights Act of 1965 traces to a commentary by a grief-stricken Camille Cosby after the 1997 murder of her son, Ennis. Since then, blacks who ought to know better have sounded the alarm from pulpits, in newspapers, on the Internet and even, it seems, in classrooms.
NEWS
November 28, 1989 | By Jodi Enda, Inquirer Harrisburg Bureau
Homeless people, who lose their right to vote along with their street addresses, would be allowed back at the polls under a bill scheduled to go before the House this week. The proposal would allow homeless adults to vote as long as they provide the state with an address where they can be found - even a park bench - and a place where they can receive mail, such as a shelter or a post office box. The Senate, meanwhile, is poised to vote on proposals that could end the election of appellate court judges and that would allow inmates to earn the right to leave prison early.
NEWS
August 26, 2010 | By William C. Kashatus
Today marks the 90th anniversary of the certification of the 19th Amendment, which gave women the right to vote. It was the culmination of one of the most controversial chapters of American history, spanning nearly 70 years. Of all the names associated with the women's suffrage movement, Katharine Wentworth Ruschenberger's is one of the least known. But her brilliant idea of a Liberty Bell replica dedicated to female suffrage - and her generosity in paying for it - were instrumental in the campaign for the amendment.
NEWS
April 19, 2008 | By Kia Gregory INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Malissa Gamble knew this audience: 40 ex-offenders about to graduate yesterday from a program designed to wean them back into society. Once, she was one of them. Over the last two weeks, those sitting in classroom rows inside the Mayor's Office of Reentry in Southwest Philadelphia received services that included job training, GED classes, drug counseling, family reunification and pep talks. They will leave the program with a resume, a graduation letter, and a letter of recommendation.
NEWS
March 12, 2006 | By Mari A. Schaefer INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Bruce S. Gordon is on a mission to help the voters of New Orleans. The NAACP president and chief executive officer is urging Louisiana and the federal government to step up and protect the right to vote for those who are still displaced by Hurricane Katrina. "One of the few things they have is the right to vote," Gordon said. Gordon was at Cheyney University yesterday to celebrate the 82d anniversary of the Media Area Unit of the NAACP and to attend a business meeting with the Pennsylvania units.
NEWS
June 1, 2012 | By William Douglas, McClatchy Newspapers
WASHINGTON - Attorney General Eric H. Holder Jr. told African American clergy leaders Wednesday that a wave of new state laws on voting and legal challenges to the Voting Rights Act of 1965 may jeopardize rights they helped fight for in the civil rights era. "Despite our nation's long tradition of extending voting rights ... a growing number of our fellow citizens are worried about the same disparities, divisions, and problems that - nearly five...
NEWS
December 28, 1999 | by Mark McDonald, Daily News Staff Writer
The wisdom of the street says that if you do the crime, be prepared to serve the time. In Pennsylvania, shedding your prison stripes doesn't make you a full citizen. Inmates convicted of a felony are barred from voting for five years after their release from prison. And that, according to the NAACP, which yesterday announced the filing of a friend-of-the-court brief in a federal lawsuit, amounts to a state-sponsored form of discrimination. J. Whyatt Mondesire, president of the Philadelphia NAACP, said minorities are treated more harshly by the criminal justice system.
NEWS
February 17, 1998 | By Acel Moore
When one thinks of individuals who made sacrifices, including giving their lives, to gain for African Americans the most cherished of American freedoms - the right to vote - one usually thinks of the South during the postReconstruction period or the 1960s civil rights movement. Names like Evers, Chaney, Goodman, Hamer and King immediately come to mind, as do places like Mississippi, Alabama and Louisiana. But the struggle to gain the right to vote was also very much a part of the history of northern states like Pennsylvania and cities like Philadelphia.
NEWS
June 14, 2000 | By Larry Eichel
Five years ago, the Pennsylvania General Assembly banned individuals convicted of felonies from registering to vote for five years after leaving prison. Simple enough, right? Not really. You see, the restriction applies only to registration, not to voting itself. If you weren't registered before going to prison, you can't vote when you get out. That's clear. If you were registered, you can vote, but only if you return to your pre-prison address. Moving to a new address requires you to re-register, in which case you're out of luck.
NEWS
March 7, 2000
It's election time and most of you know what that means. Politicians are now busy passing laws, making speeches, holding hearings, all in an effort to make themselves seem relevant and indispensable. We don't know state Rep. Andrew Carn, D-Philadelphia, well enough to judge if he's any different from most politicians. But we can say this, he isn't likely to get too many re-election votes for the cause he's now championing. He's fighting for paroled felons in Pennsylvania to have the right to vote.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
May 29, 2015 | Valerie Russ, Daily News Staff Writer
BERNARD Lafayette Jr. wasn't portrayed in the movie "Selma," about the historic marches across the Edmund Pettus Bridge in 1965 to seek voting rights for African-American citizens. Yet history shows that the young activists of the Student Non-Violent Coordinating Committee (SNCC) wouldn't have been in Selma if not for Lafayette. Lafayette, who spent part of his childhood in Philadelphia, was a college roommate of former SNCC activist Congressman John R. Lewis (D-Ga.) at American Baptist College, in Nashville, Tenn.
NEWS
May 20, 2015 | Daily News Staff
YOU CAN SKIP the recommendations that follow, which wrap up our endorsements for the candidates and questions in this race . . . as long as you do one thing: Show up at the polls today. It matters. In fact, given the attempts to erode voting rights in the past few years, exercising your right to vote matters more than ever. You'd think that the threats against voting rights would encourage people to get out to the polls, but the sad truth is that here in Philadelphia, it's the opposite: Voter turnout continues to decline.
NEWS
April 11, 2015 | By Caitlin McCabe, Inquirer Staff Writer
Cornell Brooks is small of stature and slight of build, but there was nothing slight about the NAACP president's voice once he began addressing the crowd. His fists shaking and his voice bellowing, he delivered his speech before the Cabrini College audience as though it were a Sunday sermon. "Fifty years," he roared, referencing the recent anniversary of the historic march in Selma, Ala., that helped lead to the 1965 Voting Rights Act. And yet, he thundered, "for every act of justice, there seems to be an equal and opposite action of injustice.
NEWS
July 31, 2013 | By E. J. Dionne, For The Inquirer
Attorney General Eric Holder has opened what will be an epic battle over whether our country will remain committed to equal rights at the ballot box. In a display of egregious judicial activism in June, the conservative majority on the Supreme Court gutted the Voting Rights Act. Holder made it clear last week that he will fight back. The struggle will begin in Texas, but it won't end there. "We cannot allow the slow unraveling of the progress that so many, throughout history, have sacrificed so much to achieve," Holder told a National Urban League conference in Philadelphia.
NEWS
July 27, 2013 | By Vernon Clark and Theodore Schleifer, Inquirer Staff Writers
U.S. Attorney General Eric Holder announced Thursday the first step in a legal strategy by the Obama administration to enforce the Voting Rights Act despite the recent Supreme Court decision weakening key parts of the law. In a speech to the National Urban League Conference at the Convention Center, Holder said he would seek court approval to subject Texas to the same type of federal oversight that existed between the passage of the landmark voter-protection law...
NEWS
July 5, 2013 | ASSOCIATED PRESS
ATLANTA - When the Supreme Court gutted the Voting Rights Act last week, it handed Republicans tough questions with no easy answers over how, and where, to attract voters even GOP leaders say the party needs to stay nationally competitive. The decision caught Republicans between newfound state autonomy that conservatives covet and the law's popularity among minority, young and poor voters who tend to align with Democrats. It's those voters that Republicans are eyeing to expand and invigorate the GOP's core of older, white Americans.
NEWS
July 2, 2013
THE ARROGANCE of Mayor Nutter astonishes me. One week after the fatal building collapse on Market Street, he flew to Chicago on yet another multiday "think-tank" conference. Recently, his "King's Bench" attack on District Council 33 and labor's right to collective bargaining was smacked down in the state Supreme Court by a vote of 5-1. His lawsuit seeking to oust the members of the Board of Revision of Taxes failed and a judge reinstated their positions with full back pay. Last week, he lobbied the state Legislature for more money for the city's schools with absolutely no one of significance with him!
NEWS
June 27, 2013 | By Robert Barnes, Washington Post
WASHINGTON - A divided Supreme Court on Tuesday invalidated a crucial component of the landmark Voting Rights Act of 1965, ruling that Congress has not taken into account the nation's racial progress when singling out certain states for federal oversight. The vote was 5-4, with Chief Justice John G. Roberts Jr. and the other conservative members of the court in the majority. The court did not strike down the law itself or the provision that calls for special scrutiny of states with a history of discrimination.
NEWS
June 26, 2013 | BY WILL BUNCH, Daily News Staff Writer bunchw@phillynews.com, 215-854-2957
THEY'RE CALLING yesterday's landmark ruling by the U.S. Supreme Court on voting rights "the end of the civil-rights era," maybe even the end of the Civil War that raged a century ago. What the experts can't agree on is whether that's a good thing or a bad thing. Supporters of the 5-4 ruling from the high court's conservative majority say tough standards that applied to certain states and localities - mostly in the old Confederacy - are a relic of a different era, before high minority voting rates and a black president.
NEWS
May 5, 2013
The Voting Rights Act and the Transformation of American Democracy By Gary May Basic Books. 336 pp. $28.99 Reviewed by Paul Jablow Tucked inside Gary May's solid account of the years surrounding the passage of the Voting Rights Act of 1965 is a reminder of how this book could have been far more relevant. In 1908, he briefly notes, New York City officials tried to hold down the Jewish vote by fixing registration days on the Sabbath or high holidays. He also reviews the voter ID laws of various states, including Pennsylvania, where House Majority Leader Mike Turzai made his perhaps unintentionally revealing boast that the law could deliver the state to Republican Mitt Romney in the 2012 presidential election.
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