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Voting Rights Act

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NEWS
June 26, 2009 | CHRISTINE M. FLOWERS
'WHERE is my vote?" screamed the protesters in the streets of Tehran. Bloodied opponents of Mahmoud Ahmadinejad made their disenfranchisement public and demanded that the world pay attention. And we did, using the magic of the Internet, logging on to Twitter and YouTube, and sharing, in real time, the agony of the Iranian people. We watched, horrified, as one young woman was murdered by government thugs and we witnessed the beatings of countless others. Votes are precious currency.
NEWS
June 27, 2013 | By Robert Barnes, Washington Post
WASHINGTON - A divided Supreme Court on Tuesday invalidated a crucial component of the landmark Voting Rights Act of 1965, ruling that Congress has not taken into account the nation's racial progress when singling out certain states for federal oversight. The vote was 5-4, with Chief Justice John G. Roberts Jr. and the other conservative members of the court in the majority. The court did not strike down the law itself or the provision that calls for special scrutiny of states with a history of discrimination.
NEWS
June 18, 2006
The 1965 Voting Rights Act was a landmark of American history. But it's not time to relegate this law to high-school history books. It's still needed. Much progress has been made in the last 41 years, but some American voters still need protection from subtle racial and ethnic discrimination. Congress enacted this law under the determined prodding of President Lyndon Johnson, who had been electrified into action by the televised reports of Alabama civil rights demonstrators being beaten by a white mob while attempting to march from Selma to Montgomery.
NEWS
August 2, 2006 | By Claude Lewis
Claude Lewis is a longtime Philadelphia journalist A recent Internet hoax has Camille Cosby, wife of famed comedian Bill Cosby, making a speech in which she declared that by 2007, black Americans could lose their voting rights because the 1965 Voting Rights Act was set to expire next year. E-mail with this misinformation spread across the country like a virus out of control. An e-chain letter said: "Does anyone realize that African Americans are the only group of people who require permission under the United States Constitution to vote?"
NEWS
July 19, 2006
The U.S. Senate needs to renew the Voting Rights Act. As he often is these days, Pennsylvania's senior senator, Republican Arlen Specter, is in position to help to make the right thing happen. The Judiciary Committee chairman says he'll begin moving a renewal bill today through the panel. Despite overwhelming approval by the House last week, reauthorization of the Voting Rights Act is not a certainty in the Senate. Some Southern senators, including John Cornyn (R., Texas)
NEWS
May 5, 2009
Conservative wailing about an overly activist U.S. Supreme Court is part of the backdrop as President Obama considers who should replace retiring Justice David H. Souter. Obama, a former constitutional law professor, should know that judicial activism is in the eye of the beholder. People don't mind an activist court so much when they expect a ruling in their favor. Take the case now before the court challenging the 1965 Voting Rights Act. The judicial-restraint crowd isn't raising sand, but the justices certainly appeared to cross the line into activism by even agreeing to hear the case.
NEWS
January 3, 2001 | By Frank Davies, INQUIRER WASHINGTON BUREAU
Responding to what they called "election chicanery" in Florida, several civil rights groups announced plans yesterday to push a broad agenda of election revisions, from strictly enforcing the Voting Rights Act to allowing ex-convicts to vote and abolishing the Electoral College. "We must legislate an effective voting-rights reform package so that the chicanery that happened Nov. 7 never happens again," said Walter Fauntroy, a former Washington, D.C., congressional delegate and a veteran of the civil rights movement who recalled watching President Lyndon B. Johnson sign the Voting Rights Act in 1965.
NEWS
June 26, 2013 | BY WILL BUNCH, Daily News Staff Writer bunchw@phillynews.com, 215-854-2957
THEY'RE CALLING yesterday's landmark ruling by the U.S. Supreme Court on voting rights "the end of the civil-rights era," maybe even the end of the Civil War that raged a century ago. What the experts can't agree on is whether that's a good thing or a bad thing. Supporters of the 5-4 ruling from the high court's conservative majority say tough standards that applied to certain states and localities - mostly in the old Confederacy - are a relic of a different era, before high minority voting rates and a black president.
NEWS
September 5, 1998
Perhaps you've heard the news that has rocked some segments of black America. If not, be advised: The Voting Rights Act expires in 2007! Unless Congress renews it, black people will lose their precious right to vote! In this moment of anguish, in the face of this threat to one of our fundamental freedoms, there's only one thing I can say to worried black Americans: Get a grip. It's just a stupid rumor, folks. Been ricocheting around the Internet for a year or more. In the first place, black voting rights are guaranteed not by the Voting Rights Act of 1965, but by the 15th Amendment of 1870.
NEWS
June 27, 2013
IT'S IRONIC that on the day that former President Bill Clinton took the stage at the National Constitution Center during a conference on federalism, the Supreme Court released its decision to gut part of the Voting Rights Act. The plaintiff in the case was Shelby County, Ala., one of the places on a no-fly list for making any changes to their election laws without getting prior approval from the federal government. That restriction came about as a result of the Voting Rights Act in 1965; Alabama and six other states were guilty of such blatant discrimination that such monitoring was mandated.
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NEWS
August 10, 2015 | Inquirer Editorial Board
In the context of events outside professional football, accusations that racism played a role in Eagles coach Chip Kelly's decisions to trade several black players are understandable, though not believable. In recent months, this country has seen evidence of the unequal treatment African Americans face at the hands of police, at times resulting in death. It has heard charged rhetoric in defense of an odious emblem embraced by racist groups, the Confederate battle flag. Meanwhile, schemes persist to further erode protections provided to blacks by the Voting Rights Act. With such evidence of racial discord playing in the background, Kelly traded running back LeSean McCoy in March and cornerback Brandon Boykin last week, only to have them echo wide receiver DeSean Jackson, who suggested after being traded last year that race played a role in Kelly's decision.
NEWS
July 16, 2015 | BY JOE BRANDT, Daily News Staff Writer brandtj@phillynews.com, 215-854-4890
IF PRESIDENT OBAMA had been on time to the NAACP Convention in Philly yesterday, you might've heard some thoughts on voting rights from a few Texas folks who helped strike down the state's voter-ID law. A panel discussion on such laws and the group's voting-rights initiatives was cut to a short speech from Texas NAACP President Gary Bledsoe on the same stage where Obama appeared about an hour later. The commander in chief was tied up with calls related to the Iran nuclear deal, announced yesterday.
NEWS
July 15, 2015 | By Maria Panaritis, Inquirer Staff Writer
The NAACP's national leader said Monday that the group was strong as ever and vowed that it would fight with renewed intensity on behalf of African Americans to defend freedoms under attack decades after the height of the civil rights movement. In a rousing keynote speech at the NAACP's national convention in Philadelphia, Cornell William Brooks urged members to emulate the bravery of previous generations who risked their lives with demonstrations and marches to bring about change.
NEWS
July 10, 2015 | BY WILL BUNCH, Daily News Staff Writer bunchw@phillynews.com, 215-854-2957
WHAT A DIFFERENCE 11 years makes. The last time the NAACP held its national convention in Philadelphia, in 2004, then-President George W. Bush turned down an invitation to speak - a spokesman complained of "rather hostile political comments" - and one of the highlights was a speech by Bill Cosby, hailed as "a philanthropist and a role model. " As the leading civil-rights organization returns tomorrow to the Pennsylvania Convention Center to launch its five-day 106th annual convention, the NAACP is making plans to welcome President Obama - as the nation's first black president sees rising approval numbers near the end of his second term - but it's highly doubtful that the scandal-scarred Cosby name will even come up. There will be plenty of other things to talk about.
NEWS
April 11, 2015 | By Caitlin McCabe, Inquirer Staff Writer
Cornell Brooks is small of stature and slight of build, but there was nothing slight about the NAACP president's voice once he began addressing the crowd. His fists shaking and his voice bellowing, he delivered his speech before the Cabrini College audience as though it were a Sunday sermon. "Fifty years," he roared, referencing the recent anniversary of the historic march in Selma, Ala., that helped lead to the 1965 Voting Rights Act. And yet, he thundered, "for every act of justice, there seems to be an equal and opposite action of injustice.
NEWS
January 21, 2015 | BY JENNY DeHUFF, Daily News Staff Writer dehuffj@phillynews.com, 215-854-5218
FOR THE MOTHER of Brandon Tate Brown, a young man gunned down by police last month, yesterday's re-creation of Martin Luther King Jr.'s March on Washington was especially meaningful. Brown, 26, was shot dead Dec. 15 during a traffic stop in the city's Mayfair section after a scuffle with police. Tanya Brown was one of almost a dozen speakers who took to the microphone to address about 6,000 people on Independence Mall and call for change. "I am extremely grateful to be part of an imitation of Martin Luther King's walk," Brown said.
NEWS
November 17, 2014 | BY RICHARD L. HASEN
  THE SUPREME Court's surprising decision last week to hear a new challenge to the Affordable Care Act has once again focused attention on Chief Justice John Roberts, who cast the deciding vote in a 2012 decision that saved Obamacare from being declared unconstitutional. Many court watchers expect that he will once again be the swing vote in deciding a case crucial to the health-care law, this one involving questions about who qualifies for subsidies under the law. But Roberts' vote in a recent voting-rights case suggests he might not step in to save the health law this time.
NEWS
July 15, 2014 | BY REV. DR. ROBERT P. SHINE
THOUGH it may not have made national headlines, last week a Senate committee voted on a resolution that could have major ramifications for our democracy. From where I sit, our democracy could certainly use some support. It seems to me that it's getting harder and harder for real people to vote, and easier and easier for corporations to buy elections. One of the main offenders pushing us in this direction has been the Supreme Court. From their 2010 Citizens United decision, which opened the door to unlimited corporate political spending, to their Shelby ruling last year, which gutted a key provision of the Voting Rights Act, to their McCutcheon decision in April, which said yes, the super-rich can put even more money directly into political campaigns, the Supreme Court's conservative majority doesn't exactly seem to be on the side of "We, the People.
NEWS
April 25, 2014
AFTER Tuesday's Supreme Court decision on affirmative action, we have a better idea why "Mad Men" is such a popular TV show. The series, set in the '60s, doesn't strike a note of nostalgia for the fashions, the glamour or the incessant smoking, but for the period in the country when actual progress was being made. Consider some of the milestones of the '60s: the court's Brown v. Board of Education decision, which prohibited segregated schools; the Civil Rights Act that outlawed discrimination; the enforcement of affirmative action for the first time; the Voting Rights Act; and the war on poverty, to name just a few. It was a time of high ideals and strong leaders who pushed the country to reach for racial, social, civic and financial equality.
NEWS
April 8, 2014
Fight bunny urge As Easter approaches, many adults will be tempted to buy a rabbit for a beloved child. And just months from now, animal shelters will be inundated - as they are every year - by the flood of cast-off bunnies. Heartland Rabbit Rescue urges anyone considering buying a rabbit this year to reconsider. Although rabbits can make wonderful pets, they are fragile and easily frightened. An active child who expects a cuddly pet can terrify or even injure a rabbit. A well cared for rabbit should live as long as a dog or cat (10 years or more)
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