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Wage Gap

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NEWS
January 24, 2016 | Inquirer Staff
Anderson: Show me the money Gillian Anderson isn't having any of that good ol' boy Hollywood sexism. In an interview with the Daily Beast, The X-Files star says she was initially offered half the money of her male costar, David Duchovny , for the revival of the series, starting at 10 p.m. Sunday on Fox. "It was shocking to me, given all the work that I had done in the past to get us to be paid fairly. I worked really hard toward that and finally got somewhere with it," Anderson said.
BUSINESS
January 22, 2004 | By Bob Fernandez INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Since the end of the recession in November 2001, the U.S. economy has created jobs that pay significantly less - on average 21 percent less - than jobs that disappeared through employee firings and cutbacks in shrinking industries, a Washington economics group said yesterday. The shift toward lower-paying jobs is widespread and found in 48 of the 50 states, including Pennsylvania, New Jersey and Delaware, the liberal Economic Policy Institute said. This is mainly a result of losses in manufacturing and information companies, which together shed 1.6 million jobs between November 2001 and November 2003, the group said.
NEWS
June 14, 2013
By Terry L. Fromson and Kate Michelman The Equal Pay Act became law 50 years ago this week. Unfortunately, we remain far from achieving the goal of the legislation. Nationwide, women are paid only 77 cents for every dollar paid to men, a 23-cent gap that adds up to more than $10,000 per year. These pay disparities have real-life negative consequences for women and their families. Just recently, the Pew Research Center reported that women are the sole or primary source of income in 40 percent of American households with children under age 18. The wage gap varies by state and city.
NEWS
May 9, 2000 | by Bonnie Lipton
Although women have made great strides in every facet of the workplace - reaching the pinnacle of success in countless professions - we still earn only 73 cents for every dollar earned by our male counterparts. However, in the arena of professional sports, this is one problem the women of the U.S. soccer team no longer have. Unwilling to accept unequal compensation, the 20 team members - winners of the 1999 World Cup who brought the game to new heights and increased its popularity worldwide - boycotted the Australia Cup this past January.
NEWS
November 12, 2005
Women have made enormous progress politically, economically and socially in the last 40 years. But they're not yet where they should be. Business opportunities are still hard to come by; the wage gap with men too big. Legislatures, especially in Pennsylvania and New Jersey, lack sufficient female voices. Access to essential health care and day care waxes, then wanes. On Tuesday, women have a rare opportunity to discuss these issues - and more. The second annual Pennsylvania Governor's Conference for Women will offer women tips on advancing their careers, improving their health, and achieving balance between work and home.
NEWS
March 16, 2012
Women are more than half of Philadelphia's population, so why do so few hold top leadership positions? Councilwoman Blondell Reynolds Brown posed that question last week to coincide with Women's History Month. Her call for public hearings to address gender inequities is appropriate. Women account for 53 percent of the city's 1.5 million residents, according to the latest U.S. census data. But they are under-represented in corporate and other boardrooms across the city. "If you're not at the table, you're on the menu," said Reynolds Brown.
NEWS
April 15, 2002
An observance for pay equity According to recent census figures, the median income of women in New Jersey is about 25 percent less than that of men. Nationwide, the wage gap is only about 20 percent, which means that New Jersey women are faring worse than the national average. Women of color are paid even less. The Alice Paul Chapter of the National Organization for Women is joining the National Committee on Pay Equity and hundreds of other organizations throughout the nation to observe Equal Pay Day tomorrow.
NEWS
May 18, 1997 | By Judith Serrin, INQUIRER WASHINGTON BUREAU
Some Americans are paying more taxes because of immigration, but overall, the U.S. economy benefits from it by as much as $10 billion a year, the National Research Council said yesterday. The council's report, sure to add ammunition to the political wars over the treatment of immigrants, was commissioned to give a scientific foundation to the politically charged issue. According to the researchers, the chief winners from immigration are owners and customers of restaurants, the textile industry, agriculture and hirers of domestic help.
NEWS
February 11, 2002
THERE ARE many points I could disagree with Jill Porter on, but I would like to single out one part of her Jan. 31 column - the so-called wage gap between women and men. Like many other studies that compare male and female wages, this most recent congressional study is faulty in that it only compares wages by job position and industry, not by years in a particular position or with a particular company. Because many women are balancing family and career, they find that smaller companies (and consequently companies that don't pay as much)
NEWS
November 16, 2000 | By Tracy Van Slyke, INQUIRER WASHINGTON BUREAU
For political and economic status, Connecticut and Vermont rank as the best states for American women, according to a national study released yesterday by a women's rights group. The report by the nonpartisan Institute for Women's Policy Research graded all 50 states and the District of Columbia in terms of political participation, including voter registration and women in elected and appointed offices; employment and earnings; economic autonomy; and health and well-being. On political participation, Pennsylvania ranked in the worst third, with New Jersey in the middle third.
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NEWS
January 24, 2016 | Inquirer Staff
Anderson: Show me the money Gillian Anderson isn't having any of that good ol' boy Hollywood sexism. In an interview with the Daily Beast, The X-Files star says she was initially offered half the money of her male costar, David Duchovny , for the revival of the series, starting at 10 p.m. Sunday on Fox. "It was shocking to me, given all the work that I had done in the past to get us to be paid fairly. I worked really hard toward that and finally got somewhere with it," Anderson said.
NEWS
June 14, 2013
By Terry L. Fromson and Kate Michelman The Equal Pay Act became law 50 years ago this week. Unfortunately, we remain far from achieving the goal of the legislation. Nationwide, women are paid only 77 cents for every dollar paid to men, a 23-cent gap that adds up to more than $10,000 per year. These pay disparities have real-life negative consequences for women and their families. Just recently, the Pew Research Center reported that women are the sole or primary source of income in 40 percent of American households with children under age 18. The wage gap varies by state and city.
NEWS
August 1, 2012 | Letter to the Inquirer Editor
More reason to give up on Shore I had to laugh at the Margate "Beach Bouncers" article ("Margate puts muscle into tag law," Sunday). I thought I had exhausted all the reasons for never going back to the Jersey Shore, but apparently I missed one. As if paying to use the small, crowded beaches in New Jersey isn't bad enough; now there are bouncers to make sure people pay up? Wow! People, wise up. Drive the three hours to Ocean City, Md., and discover the way summers on the beach should be. Huge, beautiful beaches, no absurd beach fees, countless quality hotels and condos, and an unlimited selection of restaurants to suit every taste.
NEWS
March 16, 2012
Women are more than half of Philadelphia's population, so why do so few hold top leadership positions? Councilwoman Blondell Reynolds Brown posed that question last week to coincide with Women's History Month. Her call for public hearings to address gender inequities is appropriate. Women account for 53 percent of the city's 1.5 million residents, according to the latest U.S. census data. But they are under-represented in corporate and other boardrooms across the city. "If you're not at the table, you're on the menu," said Reynolds Brown.
NEWS
December 12, 2008 | By Alfred Lubrano INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
People lead tough lives in hard-time Philadelphia. But the toughest life to lead in this area is that of an African American or Latina woman. And there's very little indication that will change any time soon. That's the bad news from a report being released today by Women's Way, a nationally respected philanthropic and advocacy group in Center City. The report shows women's economic standing to be stagnant, given a continuing gender wage gap and the unending ravages of poverty in the five-county area.
NEWS
November 12, 2005
Women have made enormous progress politically, economically and socially in the last 40 years. But they're not yet where they should be. Business opportunities are still hard to come by; the wage gap with men too big. Legislatures, especially in Pennsylvania and New Jersey, lack sufficient female voices. Access to essential health care and day care waxes, then wanes. On Tuesday, women have a rare opportunity to discuss these issues - and more. The second annual Pennsylvania Governor's Conference for Women will offer women tips on advancing their careers, improving their health, and achieving balance between work and home.
BUSINESS
January 22, 2004 | By Bob Fernandez INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Since the end of the recession in November 2001, the U.S. economy has created jobs that pay significantly less - on average 21 percent less - than jobs that disappeared through employee firings and cutbacks in shrinking industries, a Washington economics group said yesterday. The shift toward lower-paying jobs is widespread and found in 48 of the 50 states, including Pennsylvania, New Jersey and Delaware, the liberal Economic Policy Institute said. This is mainly a result of losses in manufacturing and information companies, which together shed 1.6 million jobs between November 2001 and November 2003, the group said.
NEWS
April 15, 2002
An observance for pay equity According to recent census figures, the median income of women in New Jersey is about 25 percent less than that of men. Nationwide, the wage gap is only about 20 percent, which means that New Jersey women are faring worse than the national average. Women of color are paid even less. The Alice Paul Chapter of the National Organization for Women is joining the National Committee on Pay Equity and hundreds of other organizations throughout the nation to observe Equal Pay Day tomorrow.
BUSINESS
March 28, 2002 | By Bob Fernandez INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The technology boom that produced tens of thousands of high-paying jobs in some sections of the country largely bypassed Pennsylvania in the late 1990s, and the wages of workers in the state reflect it. The federal government reported yesterday that the average annual pay for Pennsylvania workers was $33,999 in 2000, which was $1,297 below the national average of $35,296. In New Jersey, average pay rose 6.5 percent in 2000 to $43,691. The average pay gain in Pennsylvania was nearly two percentage points below that of the nation in 2000, further evidence of a belief that the state has failed to restructure its industrial economy for a high-tech era, economists said.
NEWS
February 11, 2002
THERE ARE many points I could disagree with Jill Porter on, but I would like to single out one part of her Jan. 31 column - the so-called wage gap between women and men. Like many other studies that compare male and female wages, this most recent congressional study is faulty in that it only compares wages by job position and industry, not by years in a particular position or with a particular company. Because many women are balancing family and career, they find that smaller companies (and consequently companies that don't pay as much)
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