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Wal Mart

BUSINESS
November 2, 2003 | By Thomas Ginsberg INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The caller had an Eastern European accent, offering "great vorkers" for cleaning Wal-Mart stores and promising "no problems getting into country. " "Put half-dozen in store, I house them, they work 15 hours a day, six months later they go home, no problem," the caller told an East Coast janitorial firm, a major contractor in Pennsylvania, New York, New Jersey and other states. The caller, who was rebuffed and reported to federal authorities, offered a glimpse into the kind of illegal employment practices for which Wal-Mart is being investigated.
NEWS
July 3, 1998 | By Tanyanika Samuels, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
A South Jersey developer has won the first round in a legal battle over building a Wal-Mart. Gloucester County Superior Court Judge Samuel G. DeSimone upheld a 1995 decision by the Township Planning Board and Town Council to change zoning that would allow the building of a Wal-Mart. Since 1996, Citizens Alliance for a Responsible Environment has fought the project proposed by the Wolfson Group. C.A.R.E. contends that the retail store, to be built along Route 41, would increase traffic and pollution in the area.
NEWS
July 10, 2006 | By Matt Blake
Supawna Meadows National Wildlife Refuge in Salem County was established by the Fish and Wildlife Service in 1971 to protect Mill Creek. That tidal estuary is a critical feeding area for nearly 6,000 pairs of colonial wading birds from nine species that nest on nearby Pea Patch Island. It is the largest such rookery on the Atlantic flyway north of Florida. At 2,800 acres, the relatively young refuge has yet to acquire all the land it needs to carry out its mission to protect threatened and endangered species.
NEWS
March 5, 1995 | By Jennifer Van Doren, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
If the township Board of Supervisors here approves a plan for a Wal-Mart store this week, shoppers could be making their lists and checking them twice as early the December holiday season. The Warminster Planning Commission unanimously gave its approval last week to build the 170,000-square-foot store on Street Road near Jacksonville Road. Wal-Mart has been seeking to build in Warminster for at least two years. It has faced opposition from neighbors fearing noise and from other shopping centers fearing competition.
BUSINESS
September 17, 1996 | By Jennifer Lin, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Store number 2,891 in the Wal-Mart chain looks a lot like all the others. Blink, and you could be in the new Wal-Mart in Apple Valley, Calif., or Roeland, Kan. The aisles are wide, and the lighting is bright. Cases of Coke line the walls, hot pink Barbie packages brighten the toy section, and the sweet aroma of doughnuts fills the air. But look closer: The signs with yellow happy faces say Harga Murah Selalu! in Bahasa Indonesian: "Always Low Prices!" In produce, those prickly fruits aren't pineapples, but stinky durians, an odd tropical fruit adored by Southeast Asians.
NEWS
November 26, 1996 | By Cal Thomas
Dan Quayle took on "Murphy Brown" about single motherhood. William Bennett battled Time Warner over gangsta rap. Each had limited success. Now, the 900-pound gorilla of retail, Wal-Mart, is making a substantial contribution to a cleaner (or at least less polluted) entertainment environment. The huge retail chain has decided to "edit" some of the raunchier lyrics and art work from its stock of compact-disc recordings. Since it accounts for 52 million of the 615 million CDs sold in the United States, Wal-Mart's decision packs an Evander Holyfield-style punch.
NEWS
July 15, 2004 | By Suzette Parmley INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Ailing Echelon Mall in Voorhees will soon get a major boost with retail powerhouse Wal-Mart moving into space left by a former J.C. Penney store. The planned 147,550-square-foot Wal-Mart store is expected to open in 2006, a company spokeswoman said. It will join Boscov's and Strawbridge's as anchor tenants. The plan is for a free-standing Wal-Mart to be built in the former Penney's parking lot. Getting Wal-Mart's commitment represents the first step in a major redevelopment of the troubled mall, said Joseph Coradino, vice president of retail for Pennsylvania Real Estate Investment Trust (PREIT)
NEWS
March 24, 1996 | By Clea Benson, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Across Route 1 from the Longwood Village shopping center, berms scrubby with winter's dead foliage rise toward stands of gray trees. It's a scene much like the rest of this township, home of horse country and stately Longwood Gardens. But soon this 11.7-acre plot along the township's growing commercial corridor will contain a gas station, a family restaurant and a 78-seat fast-food restaurant complete with drive-through service. The project, given conditional-use approval by township supervisors this month, is planned for one of the last large parcels of undeveloped land in the township's commercial zones along Route 1. After years of legal battles to stop development and after a slowdown in building during the recession of the early '90s, East Marlborough's Route 1 strip is becoming a slice of suburbia.
BUSINESS
July 31, 1998 | By Jeff Gelles, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
In what it portrays as a David-vs.-Goliath struggle over the abuse of garment workers abroad, a tiny human-rights group has set its sights squarely on the world's largest retailer: Wal-Mart. At a news conference here yesterday, the National Labor Committee said the Arkansas company was selling ever-larger percentages of imported clothes - many from countries notorious for permitting sweatshop conditions in factories - even as it touts its "Made Right Here" slogan on signs in its cavernous discount stores and in other advertising.
NEWS
March 6, 1996 | By Susan Weidener, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Wal-Mart's plan to build a series of five stores on 158 acres at the southwest corner of Routes 30 and 100 in Exton has hit a roadblock - more than 50 of them, in fact. Negotiations between the company and the township have ground to a halt since supervisors sent Wal-Mart a 30-page list of more than 50 conditions that the township wanted Wal-Mart to meet before granting a rezoning change. That was two months ago. "We would appreciate a response even if the response is, 'No way,' " Supervisors Chairwoman Diane Snyder said on Monday.
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