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SPORTS
November 10, 2008 | By Chick Ludwig, DAYTON DAILY NEWS
DAYTON, Ohio - Cincinnati Bengals fan Jason "Turk" Vangel has spent more than a month plotting a protest against the owner of his favorite NFL team. Vangel's "Operation Change" calls for a walkout before halftime of Sunday's game against the Eagles at Paul Brown Stadium. But a funny thing happened to the bliss of his boycott - the Bengals beat the Jacksonville Jaguars. It serves as a setback to his cause. "It hurts drastically," Vangel said. "Now you've got a bunch of people who are positive about the team again.
NEWS
May 17, 1986 | By Thomas J. Gibbons Jr., Inquirer Staff Writer
The threat of another walkout today by civilian 911 dispatchers at the Philadelphia police radio room was averted yesterday when an agreement was reached between their union and police officials about an order assigning them to specific seats. Eleven employees who answer emergency-telephone lines and nine broadcasters who dispatch police cars walked off the job for more than nine hours last Saturday when the seating order first was implemented. The order was designed to position the employees around the radio room, located on the second floor of the Police Administration Building, Eighth and Race Streets, so they could not easily talk with each other.
NEWS
June 11, 1992 | By Leonard W. Boasberg, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
At nearly the last minute, the union representing the 158 city-paid guards of the Philadelphia Museum of Art yesterday afternoon called off a walkout it had planned to protest the city's plans to privatize guard services. The walkout had been scheduled for 5:30, the end of the guards' regular working day. The union called it off after getting a phone call from James Coleman, assistant city managing director. However, Wayne Johnson, business representative of Local 22, said the union and city were still far apart on the issue of whether the guards at the museum will be replaced by guards working for a private firm.
NEWS
February 19, 2011 | By Kristen A. Graham, Inquirer Staff Writer
Tensions over the Philadelphia School District's plan to overhaul 18 failing schools intensified Friday, with a third student walkout and the removal from the classroom of a teacher who has been an outspoken critic of the overhaul process. The walkout at Martin Luther King High School was the third in a week protesting the district's Renaissance schools initiative. Despite warnings of dire disciplinary consequences, dozens of students left school as city and School District police looked on. And instead of being in her classroom, preparing her 11th graders for state exams, Audenried High teacher Hope Moffett was exiled to an empty administrative office.
NEWS
January 20, 1991 | By Dominic Sama, Inquirer Staff Writer
For students at Haverford High School, the Persian Gulf crisis struck close to home last week. On Tuesday, a proposed spring trip to England for advanced history students was canceled by school principal John Meehan. "To make a commitment to a trip at the same time a war is going on," Meehan said Wednesday, "I don't think that's advisable. " And on Wednesday, more than 25 students left classes and stood in drenching rain most of the school day to protest the prospect of war in the Middle East.
NEWS
July 21, 1986 | By Theresa Conroy, Special to The Inquirer
A 10-day strike by about 120 nurses' aides, maintenance workers and dietary workers at Central Park Lodge Nursing Home in Springfield Township ended Thursday afternoon after a contract was signed. Facility administrators and leaders of Local 1034 of the Retail, Wholesale and Department Stores Union, AFL-CIO, signed a contract during a four-hour meeting, which ended about 3 p.m. Striking employees, who walked out July 8 after working without a contract since May 8, voted Wednesday to return if Thursday's negotiations went as planned, according to Robert Kopsack, director of U.S. operations for Central Park Lodges.
NEWS
September 8, 1987 | By Roy H. Campbell, Ginny Wiegand and Tanya Barrientos, Inquirer Staff Writers
As the Labor Day weekend came to an end, talks continued into the night in an effort to avert a teachers' strike in Cherry Hill, while teachers in Monroe Township prepared for their first-ever walkout. In Pennsylvania, Norristown teachers voted overwhelmingly to stage their first strike. The walkout was expected to idle 6,000 students due to report for classes Thursday. Negotiators for the Cherry Hill school board and the teachers' union met separately and exchanged information throughout the day at the Sheraton Poste Inn. Starting at 10 a.m., they were aided by mediator Lawrence Hammer of the Public Employee Relations Commission.
NEWS
February 7, 1987 | By Michael D. Schaffer, Inquirer Staff Writer
When the leaders of the new United States assembled in Philadelphia in 1787 to write a constitution, a band of black Methodists forged their own dramatic statement on freedom of religion by walking out of a church that discriminated against them. Their action led to the establishment several years later of Mother Bethel African Methodist Episcopal (A.M.E.) Church at Sixth and Lombard Streets and the organization in 1816 of the A.M.E. denomination, the first black denomination in the United States.
NEWS
December 4, 1992 | By S. A. Paolantonio, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER Inquirer staff writers Doreen Carvajal, Thomas J. Gibbons Jr. and Dale Mezzacappa contributed to this article
Philadelphia faced the vexing problem of public school violence on three fronts yesterday. City Council scheduled its first hearings on school violence for Dec. 17. Councilwoman Jannie Blackwell, chairwoman of the Education Committee, plans to call Superintendent Constance E. Clayton as one of the first witnesses, followed by teachers and students who have been victims of school violence. Earlier yesterday, four female students at University City High School in West Philadelphia were arrested and charged with possession of weapons including a meat cleaver, a butcher knife, a four-foot chain, a 20-inch pipe, a straight-edged razor, four pairs of scissors and a yellow baseball bat. School security officials said the four were involved in an ongoing gang rivalry.
NEWS
March 30, 1995 | By Edward A. Robinson, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
In one of the most significant labor actions in the mushroom belt since the Kaolin strike of 1993, more than 40 mushroom pickers staged a walkout at Pietro Industries Inc. Monday to protest the "plantation slave driver" methods of a new manager. Pietro owner Peter Alonzo met with the workers Monday morning for about 45 minutes in the farm's parking lot to hear their grievances. Later that day, Alonzo said he agreed to their request and removed the assistant supervisor, Jaime Sanchez, from his position and reassigned him to a maintenance worker's job with no authority over others.
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