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Walkway

NEWS
February 3, 2010 | By Paul Nussbaum INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
A new, $300 million toll bridge on I-95 over the Delaware River might not have room for bikes or pedestrians. The 180-foot-wide replacement Scudder Falls Bridge, between Lower Makefield Township, Bucks County, and Ewing Township, Mercer County, is to have nine lanes for auto and truck traffic (up from the current four), two 14-foot-wide dedicated lanes for buses, and two 12-foot-wide shoulders. But a walkway on the bridge, which crosses over canal paths on both the Pennsylvania and New Jersey sides of the river and would offer the only pedestrian river crossing for 12 miles, might be prohibitively expensive, says the Delaware River Joint Toll Bridge Commission, which will build and operate the bridge.
NEWS
November 12, 2009 | By Matt Katz INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Msgr. Michael Doyle arrived in Camden, on the Delaware River, 41 years ago, but he couldn't find the river. "I made my way through abandoned factories and sumac trees by myself to get to the water, and the stones were black from pollution," he recalled yesterday. Committed to the belief that citizens should have access to their waterways, Doyle made reclaiming the industrialized river part of his decades-long mission to bring civil and environmental justice to the city. "The only thing I could do was dream about it and talk about it," the Roman Catholic priest said.
NEWS
November 11, 2008 | By Peter Mucha INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Once a year, few are the proud who remember: The Philadelphian who founded the Marines is buried here. Every Nov. 10 for perhaps two decades, a simple sunrise ceremony has taken place at the unlikely site where Maj. Samuel Nicholas is buried, the Quaker meetinghouse at Fourth and Arch Streets. It's an obscure ritual at a hardly noticed resting place - an almost-unknown tomb of a well-known soldier. No gravestone marks the spot, and no sign or engraving commemorates his life.
LIVING
May 11, 2007 | By Alan J. Heavens INQUIRER REAL ESTATE WRITER
Question: How can I remove the moss from my brick walkway? Answer: Power washing will usually work, but you want to use pressure below 3,000 pounds per square inch so you don't chip the brick. Brick is porous and comparatively soft, and a little too much pressure can easily damage the surface. Experts recommend removing moss while it is growing. Algae and moss thrive in shady spots, so you might want to trim back bushes and tree limbs to let more light in. You may have to clean your walkway frequently to keep up with the moss.
NEWS
January 13, 2007 | By John Sullivan and Tom Avril INQUIRER STAFF WRITERS
Nearly a week after swaying walkways at Lincoln Financial Field alarmed fans leaving an Eagles game, a third inspection of the 85-foot-high concrete walkways found them to be safe. Philadelphia's Department of Licenses and Inspections received a report yesterday from an engineer hired by the Eagles but has asked for more information by early next week. The report details the findings of private and city engineers who spent this week scrutinizing beams and bolts to make sure the sometimes swaying pedestrian walkways are sound - after fans complained for a second time Sunday that they were not. Two previous inspections, after the first reports of swaying in October, gave the steel-and-concrete structures a clean bill of health.
NEWS
February 15, 2006 | By Charles V. Curley
I need snow. It doesn't have to be a lot; even five or six more inches will do nicely. And I don't mind if it's that cold, fluffy snow, although my back gets sore just thinking about shoveling it. But with winter moving along so quickly, I need more snow. About six years ago, my elderly neighbors' appointed snow-removal man died. Ever since then, I've been shoveling their walkway - from the cars they park on the street all the way to their front door. It has probably totaled about 2,000 cubic feet of snow.
NEWS
September 7, 2005 | By Andrew Miller
Philadelphia's Old City-Society Hill section, where I live, is crowded with bars, restaurants and expensive condominiums. There is a steady influx of tourist buses, horse-drawn carriages (leaving regular deposits of smelly manure), and diesel-belching, amphibious vehicles. All of this gives what was once a fairly quiet and overlooked neighborhood a claustrophobic feel. A few days a week I escape this crowded scene by running across the Ben Franklin Bridge's walkway. The bridge rises 135 feet at its highest point over the Delaware River at high tide, and the walkway rises an additional 20 or so feet above the road.
NEWS
September 4, 2005 | By Louise Harbach INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
Cherry Hill Police Chief Brian Malloy wants to make sure his officers know the past before they walk in the door to police headquarters. Along a brick walkway from the parking lot to the entrance to the Municipal Building on Mercer Street are the names of those who came before. Each of the more than 100 bricks gives the length of service for an officer. "Each of them tells a story, each of them adds to the history of the department," said Malloy, who made it his mission when he became chief four years ago to document that history.
NEWS
September 2, 2005
Look at officials spend money on bike paths and routes. But for weeks, the Delaware River Port Authority blocked the Ben Franklin Bridge to cyclists and pedestrians in the name of security rather than setting up security cameras. The fences of many shopping areas don't allow people to walk into the communities. Even Longwood Avenue has a gate in the fence that locks off the community from the parking lot going to the Executive Plaza, Home Depot and ShopRite parking lot. The station at 36th Street is walled off from the community by a fence that people climb over, if they can. Young children can fit their feet in the chain-link fence to climb over.
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