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BUSINESS
November 14, 1990 | By Rose DeWolf, Daily News Staff Writer
The Wall Street Journal notified the 10 staffers of its Philadelphia bureau yesterday that the bureau will be closed at the end of this year as a cost- cutting measure. In a memo to the staff, managing editor Norman Pearlstine said: "Economic conditions affecting the Journal require that the news department join the company-wide effort to cut costs. " Pearlstine said some staffers will be offered transfers, but others will be laid off. He did not say how many fell into each category.
NEWS
September 18, 2011
Inside the News Business at the Wall Street Journal By Warren H. Phillips McGraw-Hill. 316 pp. $30 Reviewed by Steve Weinberg During his decades as a reporter, editor, and publisher at the Wall Street Journal, Warren H. Phillips played a significant role in transforming a limited-circulation, mediocre newspaper into a usually superb publication. Now in his mid-80s, retired from the newspaper since 1991, Phillips looks back in his memoir, Newspaperman , to explain the secrets of the successes and grapple in hindsight with some of his failures.
BUSINESS
July 10, 1987 | By ROBIN PALLEY, Daily News Staff Writer
This morning, Philadelphia developer Willard G. Rouse III turned up in the Wall Street Journal, featured in a front-page profile. Rouse, out on the West Coast today, couldn't be reached for comment on the story that among other things calls him a man who "invites people to dream with him about how great Philadelphia could become," and who "dresses so poorly that one of his bankers bought him a $600 silk sport coat a few months ago to replace the...
NEWS
July 24, 1993 | By DAN ROTTENBERG
When University of Pennsylvania President Sheldon Hackney recently (a) expressed compassion for frustrated black students who trashed one day's press run of the Daily Pennsylvanian, (b) declined to suspend Penn's "hate speech" code when it was enforced against a white student who called noisy black women students "water buffaloes," and (c) was nominated by President Clinton to head the National Endowment for the Humanities, the Wall Street Journal thought it had discovered an editorial writer's dream: a symbol of all that's wrong with politically correct American colleges and its politically correct government, wrapped up in a single mealy-mouthed academic.
BUSINESS
January 1, 1991 | By Ralph Cipriano, Inquirer Staff Writer
As a reporter for the Wall Street Journal, Vindu Goel had written stories about factories laying off workers. Yesterday, Goel was on the other end of the note pad as he told an Inquirer reporter how it felt to be out of a job. "It's a personal insult, in a way," Goel said. "You can't help but feel, what was it about me that management didn't like?" Goel was one of six journalists who lost their jobs yesterday when the Journal closed its Philadelphia news bureau, on the ninth floor of the North American Building, at 121 S. Broad St. It was shut in a company-wide, cost-cutting drive that has brought layoffs for 60 Journal employees, including a dozen reporters and editors, and buyouts of 15 more.
BUSINESS
November 7, 2015 | By David Sell, Inquirer Staff Writer
Endo CEO Rajiv De Silva tried Thursday to distance himself and his company from his former employer, Valeant Pharmaceuticals International, which has been at the center of a controversy over pharmaceutical pricing and accounting practices. Valeant, which has said it has received subpoenas from federal prosecutors, is fending off critics who say it misused a mail-order specialty pharmacy, Philidor RX Services, to inappropriately goose profits and hide inventory. Philidor, whose main facilities are in Hatboro and Horsham, Montgomery County, said last week that it would close in 30 to 90 days.
NEWS
December 12, 1997
The Worth Repeating box on yesterday's Commentary Page had the wrong source. The excerpt came from the Wall Street Journal.
NEWS
August 17, 2010 | ASSOCIATED PRESS
NEW YORK - New York City's Chelsea Art Museum is shutting down for the rest of August to avoid foreclosure. The company that owns the West 22d Street museum filed for Chapter 11 bankruptcy protection earlier this month in an effort to avoid foreclosure. A lawyer for museum president, Dorothea Keeser, told the Wall Street Journal that the museum is in discussions with various financial parties to restructure it finances. The Chelsea Art Museum features 20th and 21st century art, particularly works by artists who are less exposed in the United States than in their home countries.
NEWS
November 14, 1988
It's been widely reported that ABC's $110 million mini-series War and Remembrance is the longest and most expensive of that fading genre. But credit the Wall Street Journal for noting that this money-losing epic took two years to plan, 21 months to shoot and another year to edit - longer than it took the Allies to wage and win the war.
NEWS
July 5, 2006
HOW THE press should act during times of war has been a subject of debate since the first messenger delivered the first report of battle casualties. So there is nothing really new about the orchestrated right-wing campaign to brand the reporters and editors of the New York Times as traitors for having had the gumption to report the news: In this case that the Bush administration is tracking the finances of suspected terrorists, and of thousands of Americans, by examining overseas money wire transfers.
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BUSINESS
November 7, 2015 | By David Sell, Inquirer Staff Writer
Endo CEO Rajiv De Silva tried Thursday to distance himself and his company from his former employer, Valeant Pharmaceuticals International, which has been at the center of a controversy over pharmaceutical pricing and accounting practices. Valeant, which has said it has received subpoenas from federal prosecutors, is fending off critics who say it misused a mail-order specialty pharmacy, Philidor RX Services, to inappropriately goose profits and hide inventory. Philidor, whose main facilities are in Hatboro and Horsham, Montgomery County, said last week that it would close in 30 to 90 days.
BUSINESS
December 25, 2014 | By Bob Fernandez, Inquirer Staff Writer
Michael Angelakis, Comcast Corp.'s financial guru and vice chairman, was named one of the nation's top chief financial officers by the Wall Street Journal on Tuesday. The Journal rated him third, based on Comcast's return on invested capital, operating margin, dividend growth, and share buybacks over the last three years. The top two CFOs were Karen Hoguet of Macy's Inc. and Robert Knight of Union Pacific Corp. The Journal evaluated the financial performance of the companies in the S&P 500 index.
NEWS
January 9, 2014
TWO PROMINENT Italians have recently weighed in on Wall Street excess. One is Martin Scorsese, whose "Wolf of Wall Street" is the debauched bio of a crooked and high-living broker. The movie's a hit with critics, and traders have been howling in approval at Manhattan screenings. These same Wall Streeters have been less receptive to criticism offered by another Italian (by profession, if not birth): Pope Francis. His "Evangeli Gaudium" denounced "the absolute autonomy of the marketplace and financial speculation," and questioned the efficacy of trickle-down economic theories.
BUSINESS
December 26, 2013 | By Erin E. Arvedlund, Inquirer Columnist
I've asked for a few books as Christmas gifts, and hopefully my husband will oblige. Some of them even involve investing! First on my list, meet the newest addition, The Frackers: The Outrageous Inside Story of the New Billionaire Wildcatters , (Portfolio/Penguin, 2013). The book details our nation's remarkable and controversial energy revolution in Pennsylvania and other U.S. states, and how a country desperate for oil and gas suddenly is on the road to energy independence.
SPORTS
April 10, 2013 | Daily News Staff Report
START SPREADING the news: According to the Wall Street Journal , Tuesday was the first day since June 18, 1890, that three Philadelphia teams played three New York teams on the same day. On that day, the Journal noted, the Phillies played the Brooklyn Bridegrooms in a National League game, the Athletics played the Brooklyn Gladiators in an American Association game, and the Quakers played the New York Giants in a Players' League game....
NEWS
April 5, 2013
FRANK MAIMONE sometimes gets as hot as his pizza ovens in Northern Liberties. A pioneer, he opened Rustica Pizza in 2000, when there wasn't much to recommend the postindustrial, broken neighborhood where people had been drinking Schmidts rather than living around its hipster piazza. A Haddonfield native, Frank had an urban soul and arrived in No Libs to pursue a dream with Rustica, on 2nd Street near Poplar. After he married, he bought a nearby house that is now home to himself, his wife Mary and their two young daughters.
NEWS
July 7, 2012
Michael J. Ybarra, 45, a former Los Angeles Times reporter who had recently chronicled his extreme-sports adventures for the Wall Street Journal, was killed in a mountain-climbing fall over the weekend on the edge of Yosemite National Park. A veteran mountaineer, he had set out alone to cross the craggy Sawtooth Ridge in the Eastern Sierra and summited the 12,280-foot Matterhorn Peak before he fell about 200 feet to his death, said his sister, Suzanne Ybarra. His family reported him missing Sunday, and a rescue crew spotted his body Tuesday in a rugged area difficult to reach on foot, according to Kari Cobb, a park ranger.
NEWS
February 24, 2012 | By Sam Wood, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Temple University has named a veteran online newsman with a golden resume to lead the new Philadelphia Public Interest Information Network. Neil Budde, 55, the founder of The Wall Street Journal Online (WSJ.com), will become the first CEO of the new media venture on March 6. At Temple, he'll be charged with increasing the amount of quality public-interest journalism in the Philadelphia region. "What really appealed to me about this opportunity was to come in on the ground floor and take the great thinking that's already been done and shape it. " Budde said.
NEWS
February 14, 2012 | LOS ANGELES TIMES
JEFFREY ZASLOW, a Wall Street Journal reporter with a flair for inspirational stories who produced three nonfiction best-sellers, beginning with the 2008 book The Last Lecture about life lessons from a dying man, was killed in a car crash Friday. He was 53. Zaslow's death was announced on the website of Detroit's Fox 2 News, where his wife, Sherry Margolis, is an anchor. Zaslow was driving on a snow-covered highway in northern Michigan when he lost control of his vehicle and it was hit by a truck.
NEWS
September 18, 2011
Inside the News Business at the Wall Street Journal By Warren H. Phillips McGraw-Hill. 316 pp. $30 Reviewed by Steve Weinberg During his decades as a reporter, editor, and publisher at the Wall Street Journal, Warren H. Phillips played a significant role in transforming a limited-circulation, mediocre newspaper into a usually superb publication. Now in his mid-80s, retired from the newspaper since 1991, Phillips looks back in his memoir, Newspaperman , to explain the secrets of the successes and grapple in hindsight with some of his failures.
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