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Wallpaper

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LIVING
May 16, 2003 | By Claire Whitcomb FOR THE INQUIRER
Once upon a time - 1885, to be precise - wallpaper had so thoroughly eclipsed paint that white walls were, in the view of California architects Newsom & Newsom, nothing more than "relics of barbarism. " Today, of course, white is the darling of decorators, and the idea of patterns on walls, especially in living rooms, has receded from much of the popular imagination. But wallpaper should not be overlooked. It can be the key to extraordinary rooms, as you will discover in Wallpaper in Interior Decoration (Watson-Guptill, $40)
FOOD
May 27, 1992 | by Polly Fisher, Special to the Daily News
Dear Polly: Recently, I had to strip wallpaper from my walls. I was fortunate to have the paper come off in complete pieces; they made wonderful dropcloths for my heavy furniture! I have used wallpaper in the drawers in the bathroom. It's so easy to clean and it keeps the drawers from becoming warped due to drips from leaking bottles and tubes. I also use wallpaper for shelf liners in the kitchen. When I am painting, I always paint several coats around light switches and on outside corner areas - the areas that get dirtier than the walls.
NEWS
March 15, 1991 | By Edward Colimore, Inquirer Staff Writer
To most people, the faded pieces of wallpaper would look like trash. To preservationists, they're treasures of history and they want them back. Seven samples of historic wallpaper from houses in Colonial Williamsburg, Va., Virginia's Eastern Shore and Massachusetts were mistakenly left Wednesday in a garage at Philadelphia International Airport by a paint analyst hired to study them. He discovered the loss yesterday. Margaret Pritchard, curator of prints for Colonial Williamsburg, said the Philadelphia-area paint expert had picked up the wallpaper - most of it about two centuries old - during a Williamsburg visit before returning to begin his work.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 12, 2015
Q: In my new job, I travel a lot and have noticed hotels have wallpaper that's practically a solid color. Why do they bother when they could just paint the walls instead? - M.L. A: You have a good eye for detail. When I studied design, I wondered the same thing. But I discovered many reasons hotels and homeowners use certain wallpapers instead of paint. The biggest reasons include getting a custom, finished look - especially over rough walls - and achieving a deadening sound for a warmer atmosphere.
LIVING
September 11, 2009 | By Alan J. Heavens INQUIRER REAL ESTATE WRITER
A couple of weeks ago, I tried to answer a question from a reader about removing yellow stains on wallpaper that she attributed to gas from her heating system. I asked for your advice for a problem that I frankly had never heard of. Here are some of your answers: When I prepped my home for sale, my kitchen had about 20 years of grease and grime that had to be cleaned. I wound up using Spot Shot to clean my entire kitchen. While this is a stain remover for rugs, it has a degreaser in it and it removed all that yellow gunk that accumulates in the kitchen.
LIVING
December 9, 2005 | By Alan J. Heavens INQUIRER REAL ESTATE WRITER
Question: I would like to remove wallpaper that was put on about 15 years ago in one of my bathrooms. Is there an easy and safe way to remove it? What should I buy? Will there be any strong fumes from what I would be using? Answer: Vinegar in warm water still works best. And it would be a good thing if the person who put the wallpaper on in the first place sized the wall beforehand - a process that creates a barrier between the wall material and back of the wallpaper, so that only the paper (and not the wall)
NEWS
July 2, 1990 | By Ginny Wiegand, Inquirer Staff Writer
In parts of the South Philadelphia rowhouse they bought a year ago, Jeff Cohen and his wife, Linda May, painstakingly scraped off two layers of paint and - count 'em - nine layers of wallpaper. Beneath this catalogue of changing tastes and times, Cohen, an architectural historian, and his wife, an anthropologist, came upon something truly off the wall: cave art for city dwellers. In the tiny foyer of their three-story, brick home in the 700 block of South Warnock Street, they uncovered two small, slightly peeling murals done in earth tones of brown, green and gold.
REAL_ESTATE
July 10, 1992 | By Al Carrell, SPECIAL TO THE INQUIRER
Wallpaper can give your home a new look, but if you end up with bubbles or peeling paper, it might not be the look you're after. Even if you didn't do the original job yourself, you can do most of the repairs. Bubbles are caused when adhesive fails to hold the paper to the wall, or where a pocket of paste wasn't smoothed away. All you need to do to get rid of a bubble is to make a pinhole in the paper to let the air or paste out. Before pressing the paper back into place, use a syringe to squirt a little glue or wallpaper paste into the gap. Then press the paper into place, using a roller to get good adhesion.
REAL_ESTATE
July 5, 1991 | By Al Carrell, Special to The Inquirer
I have thought about adding the small wallpaper borders that I have seen, but I have never wallpapered before. How is this usually done? It is really pretty simple. First, you need to find out how much paper you need. Just measure all the way around the walls that you want to border. When you go to buy your paper, try to make sure that all of the pieces match exactly. Some papers have dye-lot numbers posted on the side, which will help you. You might want to buy a little extra just in case you hit a snag.
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ENTERTAINMENT
August 6, 2016 | By Jennifer Adams
Q: Please help. I see so many pictures of midcentury ranches, but what do I do with a ranch house that was built in the 1970s? My house is dark on the inside, with a tiny kitchen and has a lot of old-fashioned shutters, lights, and wallpaper. I just don't know where to start or if I should just move. - L. A: Ranch style houses from the 1970s are hugely unappreciated. Even when they were new, people disguised them with early-American, Spanish, or Victorian styles (very popular back then)
REAL_ESTATE
May 16, 2016 | By Sally A. Downey, For The Inquirer
The property had been vacant for eight years. Overgrown ivy obscured brick paving, shutters were falling off, and the portico was collapsing. But it was on a charming street in the Yorkshire Historic District of Burlington City, and the corner house with two adjoining lots had space for a garden and off-street parking. It had an interesting story, too: According to local lore, it was a bordello during the last half of the 19th century. The new owners, Bob Mott and Dennis Baker, had met in Hawaii and had been together for only a year when the Navy transferred Baker to New Jersey in 2014.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 12, 2015
Q: In my new job, I travel a lot and have noticed hotels have wallpaper that's practically a solid color. Why do they bother when they could just paint the walls instead? - M.L. A: You have a good eye for detail. When I studied design, I wondered the same thing. But I discovered many reasons hotels and homeowners use certain wallpapers instead of paint. The biggest reasons include getting a custom, finished look - especially over rough walls - and achieving a deadening sound for a warmer atmosphere.
REAL_ESTATE
November 17, 2013 | By Christine Bahls, For The Inquirer
Jeff and Kris Morrison have a contemporary center-hall Colonial in the West Chester area. Or so it appears at the first, enter-the-living-room glance. But stand still for a minute, and the neutral tones and overstuffed sofas recede into the background. In their places pop out a family heirloom and a talented offspring's creation. In a corner is Jeff's grandfather's green wooden trunk, the kind with the metal latches and the individual sections in the top compartment. In each section is an original paper picture of a 19th-century woman.
REAL_ESTATE
October 14, 2013 | By Alan J. Heavens, Inquirer Real Estate Writer
Q uestion: My problem is foil paper on drywall. The paper is on very tight and is impossible to remove. In a column a long time ago, you mentioned a product by Zinsser called Shieldz. Do you think that would work? I have a powder room and small bathroom with the problem. I know I could drywall the rooms, but hope it won't be necessary. Answer: Manufactured now by Rust-o-leum, Shieldz is a primer you apply to walls to make hanging wallpaper easier. It has nothing to do with removing foil paper, or any wallpaper for that matter.
NEWS
September 28, 2012
A few years ago, Candy Depew changed her job title from "artist" to "designer. " "I got tired of that concept of the starving artist," she says, "and of how no one thinks they have to pay an artist - or if they do, the artist gets paid last. " It seems that small semantic shift is enough to augment the size of a bank account: According to her research, designers are paid a minimum of 20 percent more than artists for doing the exact same work. Still, she calls her life an "art project," and her title modifications are markers on that canvas.
NEWS
August 24, 2012 | By Alan J. Heavens, Inquirer Real Estate Writer
A reader said there was a 20-foot crack running across her 15-year-old concrete patio that had been repaired with caulking. She asked if she should have the patio repoured. Another reader, who has been in residential construction and building supplies for 45 years, wrote that any 200-square-foot patio that has lasted 15 years with only one crack means the patio was built right in the first place, but with one exception. "The crack tells me the original builder did not put in the correct expansion joints.
REAL_ESTATE
January 8, 2012 | By Joanne McLaughlin, INQUIRER REAL ESTATE EDITOR
We are what we eat. But we are also where we live. Volumes of anthropological, criminological, and sociological research back me up on this. What results is a rich stew of eccentric flavors seasoned by our parents' housing histories and their parents' housing histories, too. Is it any wonder then that home-buying - and home-selling - decisions are often driven by emotion, that gut feeling that this is the house we were meant to live in?...
NEWS
July 1, 2011 | By Alan J. Heavens, Inquirer Real Estate Writer
Question: I read your column on removing wallpaper. My problem is how to fix wallpaper that is opening at the seams. I have tried using the seam sealer that comes in tubes but none of it works. Answer: It's apparent that the seams are reopening as a result of a wallpapering job done poorly. If the seams won't close with all the products on the market designed to accomplish this, the problem may not be fixable, and you'll need to remove the paper and do it again. Q: We've bought a five-year-old house in Winter Haven, Fla. The driveway is all brick and very nice.
BUSINESS
April 4, 2011 | By Joseph N. DiStefano, Inquirer Staff Writer
John Collins and his children, owners of the Wayne-based wallpaper designer Wallquest Inc., were in Washington on Thursday, drinking mojitos and eating arroz con pollo with Export-Import Bank boss Fred P. Hochberg, to collect honors as the government-backed bank's Small Business Exporter of the Year. Wallquest employs 120 at its Devon Park Drive headquarters and plant, and 30 at smaller factories in New York and New Jersey, almost double its payroll of two years ago. Foreign demand, targeted marketing, and careful use of both old and new print technology have given the industry new life, after cut-rate mass retailers nearly wiped out domestic wallpaper-makers, says vice president Jack Collins, John's son. Wallquest sales abroad, financed by a $10 million PNC Bank working capital line partly guaranteed by Ex-Im, rose 76 percent in 2010, to more than $17 million, for buyers and brands in China, Saudi Arabia, Turkey, Russia, Brazil, and more than 40 other countries.
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