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ENTERTAINMENT
September 21, 2012 | By Monica Peters, For The Inquirer
Go inside the phobic world of 10-year-old Sheila Tubman, who is scared of everything, at the Walnut Street Theatre for Kids' stage production Saturday of Otherwise Known as Sheila the Great , based on the 1972 book by Judy Blume. While at day camp, Sheila meets an adventurous girl named Merle "Mouse" Ellis. Sheila covers up her fears with bravado to be friends with Mouse. Meeting Mouse, combined with a family vacation to Tarrytown, forces Sheila to overcome some of her secret fears, including being in the dark, swimming, spiders, dogs and more.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 19, 2014 | By Monica Peters, For The Inquirer
On Saturday, you can see what happens when a pink thing goes too far at Walnut Street Theatre's stage production of Pinkalicious , which runs through April 27. Despite her parents' warnings, Pinkalicious Pinkerton just can't stop eating pink cupcakes. Now she's come down with a case of pinkititis and is turning pink from head to toe - then pinker, and even pinker. The cure? Could it be green and leafy? The play is based on the popular children's book by Victoria and Elizabeth Kann.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 22, 2013 | By Toby Zinman, For The Inquirer
David Lindsay-Abaire's Broadway hit play Good People , at Walnut Street Theatre, is about class. It is a sociological cliche that the American inclination is always to root for the underdog, which often means, as it does here, the unlucky, the uneducated, the unemployed. "Un" is the fact of life in "Southie," a thickly accented rough and tough neighborhood in Boston. The plot centers on Margaret (Julie Czarnecki) who, fired by her nice-guy boss (Jered McLenigan) from her job at the Dollar Store, faces eviction from her not-so-nice landlady (Sharon Alexander)
ENTERTAINMENT
January 30, 2016 | By Toby Zinman, For The Inquirer
Harvey , a genial, old-fashioned comedy, is currently providing gentle, old-fashioned entertainment at the Walnut Street Theatre. There are lots of wink-wink, nudge-nudge sexual innuendos, while the tip-top cast, made up of some of Philadelphia's favorite actors - all masters of the double-take - is hamming it up under Bob Carlton's broad direction. The play, recently revived on Broadway with The Big Bang Theory 's Jim Parsons, is best remembered in the 1950 film version starring Jimmy Stewart.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 26, 2016 | By Jim Rutter, For The Inquirer
Star Wars , Lord of the Rings , and the X-Men movies prove there's much contemporary interest in the backstories of famous characters. And though it took JK Rowling only a year after her final Harry Potter novel to write a prequel, more than 100 years passed before Dave Barry (yes, that Dave Barry) and Ridley Pearson created one for Peter Pan, that other most famous boy from English literature. Rick Elice's 2009 play Peter and the Starcatcher dramatizes Barry and Pearson's similarly titled novel, which the Walnut Street Theatre's intentionally over-the-top production now brings to life in a fantastical romp through England, Neverland, and the high seas.
NEWS
May 23, 2014
HAD ENOUGH of deformed, subterranean opera-house denizens, barricade-building, 19th-century French student revolutionaries, musical adaptations of obscure movies and the endless parade of Disney characters come-to-life? Then head to the Walnut Street Theatre and bask in the glory of the way things used to be, when musicals sparkled with clever comedic banter, genuinely funny jokes and honest-to-goodness songs that stayed in your head long after the curtain fell, as opposed to dialogue delivered via instantly forgettable melodies wrapped in ersatz rock or watered-down R&B. Through July 13, the Walnut is presenting "How To Succeed In Business Without Really Trying," one of the most popular musical comedies of all time.
NEWS
November 22, 2013
IT'S A good thing I thoroughly enjoyed "Elf," the musical-stage version of the hit 2003 movie that runs through Jan. 5 at the Walnut Street Theatre. If I hadn't, I'd likely have to surrender my membership in the human race. That's because only the Grinchiest of Scrooges (or is that Scroogiest of Grinches?) could give a "Bah, humbug!" to this merry melange of yuletide music and mirth. Like the film upon which it is based, "Elf" follows the misadventures of a bumbling but lovable North Pole denizen who, though raised from infanthood as one of Santa's elves, is actually a human being (hence his unusual height and inability to speedily and efficiently construct toys)
NEWS
April 10, 2016 | By Jim Rutter, For The Inquirer
The Independence Studio on 3 at the Walnut Street Theatre might be the smallest spot Patsy Cline (Jenny Lee Stern) has ever played. But what a difference a venue makes to the success of this rocking show! I first caught Always . . . Patsy Cline last winter at the Bristol Riverside Theatre, where the traditional and elevated stage distanced the audience from this intimate two-handed story and diminished the plausibility of the show's premise. Writer Ted Swindley based this jukebox musical on a true, chance encounter between Louise Seger (Denise Whelan)
ENTERTAINMENT
April 2, 1987 | By NELS NELSON, Daily News Theater Critic
Three one-act plays: "One for the Road" and "Applicant," by Harold Pinter, and "Audience," by Vaclav Havel. Directed by Andrew Lichtenberg, costumes by Christine A. Moore, lighting by Rebecca R. Klein, sound by Jeff Chestek. Presented by the Walnut Street Theatre Co. in the Studio 3 Theatre, 9th and Walnut streets, through April 12. By arrangement or coincidence, two contemporary plays dealing with the interrogation of political prisoners have opened in this city within three days of each other.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
ENTERTAINMENT
May 7, 2016
Theater 11th Hour Theatre Company: See What I Wanna See Michael John LaChiusa's musical trio of stories about lust, greed, murder, faith & redemption.. Closes 5/15. Christ Church Neighborhood House, 20 N. American St.; 267-987-9865. www.11thhourtheatrecompany.org . $11-$40. 1812 Productions: I Will Not Go Gently Comedy about how various people handle the challenges of middle age. Closes 5/15. Plays & Players Theatre, 1714 Delancey St. $36-$42. A Single Shard An orphan in 12th-century Korea struggles to master the art of pottery & achieve a better life.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 30, 2016 | By Michael Harrington, Staff Writer
The Philadelphia Science Festival closes with its traditional carnival, moved from the Parkway to the Great Plaza at Penn's Landing. It will feature more than 150 exhibitions, hands-on experiments, and performances, including live animals from the Philadelphia Zoo, wrestling robots, and more. (There will be exploding stuff, we think.) 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Saturday at Great Plaza at Penn's Landing, 101 S. Columbus Blvd. Admission is free. Information: philasciencefestival.org Catch a falling 'Star' Kids ask questions, many with no answers (many)
ENTERTAINMENT
April 16, 2016 | By Michael Harrington, Staff Writer
Time to get down! How can you resist, when Elmo asks? Join the little guy and his furry and feathered (and felt) friends Cookie Monster, Abby Cadabby, Ernie, and company for Sesame Street Live: Let's Dance! on North Broad Street to "Do the Robot" and "Shake Your Head One Time" in an interactive event. That's right - it's a dance party! 10:30 a.m. and 7 p.m. Friday, 10:30 a.m., 2 and 4 p.m. Saturday, and 1 and 4:30 p.m. Sunday at the Liacouras Center, 1776 N Broad St. Tickets: $15 and $32. Information: 1-800-298-4200 or www.liacourascenter.com . Rule the planet A tree grows in the Kimmel Center.
NEWS
April 10, 2016 | By Jim Rutter, For The Inquirer
The Independence Studio on 3 at the Walnut Street Theatre might be the smallest spot Patsy Cline (Jenny Lee Stern) has ever played. But what a difference a venue makes to the success of this rocking show! I first caught Always . . . Patsy Cline last winter at the Bristol Riverside Theatre, where the traditional and elevated stage distanced the audience from this intimate two-handed story and diminished the plausibility of the show's premise. Writer Ted Swindley based this jukebox musical on a true, chance encounter between Louise Seger (Denise Whelan)
ENTERTAINMENT
March 30, 2016 | By Lauren McCutcheon, For the Daily News
'Freckleface Strawberry the Musical' The long: Julianne Moore - idolized by actors, redheads, and smart parents everywhere - wrote an autobiographical storybook that became six storybooks and this 70-minute, Off-Broadway hit about a 7-year-old girl who wishes her freckles weren't so . . . different. The short: Fun, fast, feel-good musical boldly boosts big kids' confidence. The demo: Elementary school through junior high. (Although we can think of a few news-monopolizing adults who could stand to learn Freckleface's lesson, too.)
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