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Walnut Street Theatre

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ENTERTAINMENT
September 21, 2012 | By Monica Peters, For The Inquirer
Go inside the phobic world of 10-year-old Sheila Tubman, who is scared of everything, at the Walnut Street Theatre for Kids' stage production Saturday of Otherwise Known as Sheila the Great , based on the 1972 book by Judy Blume. While at day camp, Sheila meets an adventurous girl named Merle "Mouse" Ellis. Sheila covers up her fears with bravado to be friends with Mouse. Meeting Mouse, combined with a family vacation to Tarrytown, forces Sheila to overcome some of her secret fears, including being in the dark, swimming, spiders, dogs and more.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 22, 2013 | By Toby Zinman, For The Inquirer
David Lindsay-Abaire's Broadway hit play Good People , at Walnut Street Theatre, is about class. It is a sociological cliche that the American inclination is always to root for the underdog, which often means, as it does here, the unlucky, the uneducated, the unemployed. "Un" is the fact of life in "Southie," a thickly accented rough and tough neighborhood in Boston. The plot centers on Margaret (Julie Czarnecki) who, fired by her nice-guy boss (Jered McLenigan) from her job at the Dollar Store, faces eviction from her not-so-nice landlady (Sharon Alexander)
NEWS
November 22, 2013
IT'S A good thing I thoroughly enjoyed "Elf," the musical-stage version of the hit 2003 movie that runs through Jan. 5 at the Walnut Street Theatre. If I hadn't, I'd likely have to surrender my membership in the human race. That's because only the Grinchiest of Scrooges (or is that Scroogiest of Grinches?) could give a "Bah, humbug!" to this merry melange of yuletide music and mirth. Like the film upon which it is based, "Elf" follows the misadventures of a bumbling but lovable North Pole denizen who, though raised from infanthood as one of Santa's elves, is actually a human being (hence his unusual height and inability to speedily and efficiently construct toys)
ENTERTAINMENT
April 2, 1987 | By NELS NELSON, Daily News Theater Critic
Three one-act plays: "One for the Road" and "Applicant," by Harold Pinter, and "Audience," by Vaclav Havel. Directed by Andrew Lichtenberg, costumes by Christine A. Moore, lighting by Rebecca R. Klein, sound by Jeff Chestek. Presented by the Walnut Street Theatre Co. in the Studio 3 Theatre, 9th and Walnut streets, through April 12. By arrangement or coincidence, two contemporary plays dealing with the interrogation of political prisoners have opened in this city within three days of each other.
NEWS
October 20, 1988 | By Nels Nelson, Daily News Theater Critic
Another season and another show at the Walnut Street Theatre, and still another hearty slap on the back of Bernard Havard for his keen assessment of the largest, non-profit theater subscription audience in Pennsylvania. The Walnut subscribers like their shows corny, cliche-ridden, easily digested, happily ended, devoid of distressing surprises and preferably over in time for a leisurely nightcap before snuggling in their cocoons for the 11 o'clock news. "Social Security," the season opener which Havard served up for his people last night, meets the Walnut standards about as well as any production in the company's brief and prodigiously successful history.
NEWS
November 21, 2002 | By Douglas J. Keating INQUIRER THEATER CRITIC
With a $5 million grant from the state and a purchase agreement on a parking lot next door, the Walnut Street Theatre is poised to launch a campaign to build a 300-to-350-seat theater adjacent to its historic building at Ninth and Walnut Streets. Bernard Havard, the Walnut's producing artistic director, said the state grant - part of $43 million that Gov. Schweiker awarded to area cultural groups Tuesday - was a major initial step toward the construction of a second performance space.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 1, 2009 | By Howard Shapiro INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Buy a single ticket to the Walnut Street Theatre - just one ticket for a specific show - and you'll be asked to be a theater critic. "How did you like the show?" someone will inquire in a phone call a few days later - and then tell you what subscription options you have for more shows at the nation's oldest working theater. Tomorrow - the actual date it opened in 1809, as a circus - the theater company celebrates its bicentennial with an invited audience and some performers who have appeared there over the decades.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 3, 2013
Through April 14 at the Walnut Street Theatre's Independence Studio on 3, 825 Walnut St. Tickets: $30-$40. 215-574-3550 or www.walnutstreettheatre.org
ENTERTAINMENT
May 21, 2013
Through June 2 at the Walnut Street Theatre's Studio 5, Ninth and Walnut Streets. Tickets: $17-$22. 215-423-0254 or www.simpatico.org
NEWS
August 2, 2010
Becky Shaw The Wilma Theater The Breath of Life Lantern Theater Company The History Boys Arden Theatre Company If You Give a Mouse a Cookie Arden Theatre Company Welcome to Yuba City Pig Iron Theatre Company Gabriel Quinn Bauriedel Welcome to Yuba City /Pig Iron Theatre Company James J. Christy Rabbit Hole /Arden Theatre Company Walter Dallas Blue Door /Arden Theatre Company...
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ARTICLES BY DATE
ENTERTAINMENT
March 22, 2014 | By Toby Zinman, For The Inquirer
  Corpses in the cellar, clueless cops, sweet old ladies, long-lost brothers, crazy other brothers: This is the farcical frolic that is Arsenic and Old Lace at the Walnut Street Theatre. The Blacklist it's not, although there are plenty of serial killers on the scene. A famous play written 75 years ago by a playwright nobody ever heard of (Joseph Kesselring) and made into an even more famous movie, Arsenic and Old Lace is a rom-com a la Keystone Kops, served with a large helping of vaudevillian chase scenes (rolling pins and all)
ENTERTAINMENT
February 25, 2014 | By Jim Rutter, For The Inquirer
"It's a waste of time and nothing good will come of it!" Before Thursday night, I would have agreed with that attitude toward an adult who was adopted as a child into a healthy, welcoming family and who late in life decided to seek out his "real" parents. Eric Conger's Beautiful Boy proved me wrong. Now in its world premiere at the Walnut Street Theatre's Independence Studio on 3, Conger's exquisitely constructed, moving play begins with Bill Moore (Jeff Coon) attending the funeral of the woman who raised him. Recently unemployed, he decides at 49 to find his birth parents, and hopes to discover himself.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 13, 2014 | By Toby Zinman, For The Inquirer
An enchanting play about enchantment. With Aaron Cromie working his theatrical magic, Idiopathic Ridiculopathy Consortium's production of Ondine , by the French modernist Jean Giraudoux, is a charmer. The tiny stage at the Walnut Street Theatre's Studio 5 is the perfect venue. Lisi Stoessel's set looks like an illustration from an old book of fairy tales, a little house in the midst of a dark forest. This, combined with Matt Sharp's evocative lighting and Adriano Shaplin's sensational sound design in which storms rage and the air is filled with voices, creates a world where Hans (Andrew Carroll)
ENTERTAINMENT
January 25, 2014 | By Wendy Rosenfield, For The Inquirer
The Walnut Street Theatre's set for Jon Robin Baitz's Other Desert Cities , with its airy vaulted ceiling, floating staircase, and open hearth with an enormous hammered-copper hood, implies multimillion-dollar mountain views, and clubhouse access. Combined with midcentury modern furnishings - all wood, with pops of teal and mustard upholstery - set designer Todd Edward Ivins tells us all we need to know about this sunken living-room melodrama long before we realize it. The play, a Pulitzer finalist and Tony winner, is firmly rooted in the 20th-century stage tradition of dysfunctional families taking a long journey, drinking, and fighting well into night.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 1, 2014 | By Samantha Melamed, Inquirer Staff Writer
On a Tuesday evening not long ago, half a dozen parents hurried into the Arden Theatre Company's new building for Philly's latest premiere: a theatrical adaptation of the video game Minecraft .The play, created and performed by ebullient third and fourth graders, wasn't quite ready for the main stage. But the fact that it was performed at all was a remarkable accomplishment given the venue: the Arden's brand-new, $5.8 million Hamilton Family Arts Center. After all, the company bought the 22,000-square-foot industrial building, just up Second Street from its theater, in the depths of the recession.
NEWS
December 27, 2013
TODAY'S Theaterdelphia marks the end of the column's first year of existence. And what a year it's been! According to the sacred Entertainment Writer's Oath, I am bound to wrap up the year gone by with a "10 Best"-type list. Well, that would be fine if I had been able to see every play staged in this region in the past 51 weeks. Even if I didn't have other responsibilities here at the People Paper, that would be a Herculean task (this building's other journalistic tenant has four regular reviewers, and even they don't get to everything)
ENTERTAINMENT
November 30, 2013 | By Michael Harrington, Inquirer Staff Writer
Let us consider what the season has to offer - besides the Black Friday shopping demolition derby, parties soaked with eggnog, and general frenzy wrapped in pretty paper and too many bows. Folks, there's fun to be had amid the madness of gift-buying and wrestling with tangled strings of lights. As ever, the region this year delivers a multitude of events, and, as ever, we're unwrapping the highlights (there are a lot of presents).   A Christmas Carol Charles Dickens' enduring 1843 tale becomes a tour de force when Scott Langdon performs every role, from Scrooge to Bob Cratchit to Tiny Tim (not to mention Fezziwig)
ENTERTAINMENT
November 26, 2013 | By Toby Zinman, For The Inquirer
If you're wondering whether anybody under 90 remembers the singer and celebrity personality Sophie Tucker, who was born in 1884, the answer is clear: At least three people do. This tribute show, which opened Friday at the Walnut Street Theatre's Independence Studio on 3, is a bio-cabaret created by Richard Hopkins, Jack Fournier, and Kathy Halenda. Halenda plays Tucker, singing some great songs that are familiar even if Tucker is not attached to them in memory. Much of the pleasure in any biography is that you already know something about the subject and want to know more.
NEWS
November 22, 2013
IT'S A good thing I thoroughly enjoyed "Elf," the musical-stage version of the hit 2003 movie that runs through Jan. 5 at the Walnut Street Theatre. If I hadn't, I'd likely have to surrender my membership in the human race. That's because only the Grinchiest of Scrooges (or is that Scroogiest of Grinches?) could give a "Bah, humbug!" to this merry melange of yuletide music and mirth. Like the film upon which it is based, "Elf" follows the misadventures of a bumbling but lovable North Pole denizen who, though raised from infanthood as one of Santa's elves, is actually a human being (hence his unusual height and inability to speedily and efficiently construct toys)
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