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Walnut Street Theatre

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ENTERTAINMENT
September 21, 2012 | By Monica Peters, For The Inquirer
Go inside the phobic world of 10-year-old Sheila Tubman, who is scared of everything, at the Walnut Street Theatre for Kids' stage production Saturday of Otherwise Known as Sheila the Great , based on the 1972 book by Judy Blume. While at day camp, Sheila meets an adventurous girl named Merle "Mouse" Ellis. Sheila covers up her fears with bravado to be friends with Mouse. Meeting Mouse, combined with a family vacation to Tarrytown, forces Sheila to overcome some of her secret fears, including being in the dark, swimming, spiders, dogs and more.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 7, 2015 | By Monica Peters, For The Inquirer
What's that smell? It's The Stinky Cheese Man and Other Fair(l)y (stoopid) Tales at Walnut Street Theatre through Sunday. The hour-long musical comedy is based on the immensely popular 1992 book by Jon Scieszka and Lane Smith. Jack tries to save himself from being eaten by the Giant by regaling him with fairy tales, frequently fractured (Cinderumplestiltskin, anyone? Goldilocks and the Three Elephants?). Fairy-tale worlds converge and come to life as the audience goes on a journey into Jack's crazy world.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 22, 2013 | By Toby Zinman, For The Inquirer
David Lindsay-Abaire's Broadway hit play Good People , at Walnut Street Theatre, is about class. It is a sociological cliche that the American inclination is always to root for the underdog, which often means, as it does here, the unlucky, the uneducated, the unemployed. "Un" is the fact of life in "Southie," a thickly accented rough and tough neighborhood in Boston. The plot centers on Margaret (Julie Czarnecki) who, fired by her nice-guy boss (Jered McLenigan) from her job at the Dollar Store, faces eviction from her not-so-nice landlady (Sharon Alexander)
NEWS
November 22, 2013
IT'S A good thing I thoroughly enjoyed "Elf," the musical-stage version of the hit 2003 movie that runs through Jan. 5 at the Walnut Street Theatre. If I hadn't, I'd likely have to surrender my membership in the human race. That's because only the Grinchiest of Scrooges (or is that Scroogiest of Grinches?) could give a "Bah, humbug!" to this merry melange of yuletide music and mirth. Like the film upon which it is based, "Elf" follows the misadventures of a bumbling but lovable North Pole denizen who, though raised from infanthood as one of Santa's elves, is actually a human being (hence his unusual height and inability to speedily and efficiently construct toys)
NEWS
May 23, 2014
HAD ENOUGH of deformed, subterranean opera-house denizens, barricade-building, 19th-century French student revolutionaries, musical adaptations of obscure movies and the endless parade of Disney characters come-to-life? Then head to the Walnut Street Theatre and bask in the glory of the way things used to be, when musicals sparkled with clever comedic banter, genuinely funny jokes and honest-to-goodness songs that stayed in your head long after the curtain fell, as opposed to dialogue delivered via instantly forgettable melodies wrapped in ersatz rock or watered-down R&B. Through July 13, the Walnut is presenting "How To Succeed In Business Without Really Trying," one of the most popular musical comedies of all time.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 2, 1987 | By NELS NELSON, Daily News Theater Critic
Three one-act plays: "One for the Road" and "Applicant," by Harold Pinter, and "Audience," by Vaclav Havel. Directed by Andrew Lichtenberg, costumes by Christine A. Moore, lighting by Rebecca R. Klein, sound by Jeff Chestek. Presented by the Walnut Street Theatre Co. in the Studio 3 Theatre, 9th and Walnut streets, through April 12. By arrangement or coincidence, two contemporary plays dealing with the interrogation of political prisoners have opened in this city within three days of each other.
NEWS
October 20, 1988 | By Nels Nelson, Daily News Theater Critic
Another season and another show at the Walnut Street Theatre, and still another hearty slap on the back of Bernard Havard for his keen assessment of the largest, non-profit theater subscription audience in Pennsylvania. The Walnut subscribers like their shows corny, cliche-ridden, easily digested, happily ended, devoid of distressing surprises and preferably over in time for a leisurely nightcap before snuggling in their cocoons for the 11 o'clock news. "Social Security," the season opener which Havard served up for his people last night, meets the Walnut standards about as well as any production in the company's brief and prodigiously successful history.
NEWS
November 21, 2002 | By Douglas J. Keating INQUIRER THEATER CRITIC
With a $5 million grant from the state and a purchase agreement on a parking lot next door, the Walnut Street Theatre is poised to launch a campaign to build a 300-to-350-seat theater adjacent to its historic building at Ninth and Walnut Streets. Bernard Havard, the Walnut's producing artistic director, said the state grant - part of $43 million that Gov. Schweiker awarded to area cultural groups Tuesday - was a major initial step toward the construction of a second performance space.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 1, 2009 | By Howard Shapiro INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Buy a single ticket to the Walnut Street Theatre - just one ticket for a specific show - and you'll be asked to be a theater critic. "How did you like the show?" someone will inquire in a phone call a few days later - and then tell you what subscription options you have for more shows at the nation's oldest working theater. Tomorrow - the actual date it opened in 1809, as a circus - the theater company celebrates its bicentennial with an invited audience and some performers who have appeared there over the decades.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
ENTERTAINMENT
March 21, 2015 | By Toby Zinman, For The Inquirer
Agatha Christie's old chestnut of a novel, Ten Little Indians , was a best-seller in 1939 and was adapted for the stage in 1943. It creaks along under its politically correct title, And Then There Were None , on the Walnut Street Theatre's main stage, providing a mildly amusing evening and a mildly puzzling whodunit. As a murder mystery, it has more in common with the board game Clue than with Law and Order . The premise: 10 people, strangers to one another, have been invited to an isolated manor house in the middle of an island for a weekend.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 12, 2015 | By Jenny DeHuff
THANK GOD for the Philadelphia Film Society! On Monday, it officially announced the acquisition of the historic Prince Music Theater, on Chestnut Street near Broad. The beloved theater had been shuttered since October, when the theatrical organization that occupied the building - the American Music Theater Festival - failed to find new leadership after its board chairman died. Prince reps tell me that the beleaguered theater had been in a constant state of bankruptcy but was being floated by its board chairman.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 7, 2015 | By Monica Peters, For The Inquirer
What's that smell? It's The Stinky Cheese Man and Other Fair(l)y (stoopid) Tales at Walnut Street Theatre through Sunday. The hour-long musical comedy is based on the immensely popular 1992 book by Jon Scieszka and Lane Smith. Jack tries to save himself from being eaten by the Giant by regaling him with fairy tales, frequently fractured (Cinderumplestiltskin, anyone? Goldilocks and the Three Elephants?). Fairy-tale worlds converge and come to life as the audience goes on a journey into Jack's crazy world.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 4, 2015 | By Toby Zinman, For The Inquirer
George Bernard Shaw stuffed enough big ideas, quotable lines, interesting characters, and surprising plot turns into Misalliance to furnish half a dozen contemporary plays. Currently playing at the Walnut Street Theatre's Studio 5, the Idiopathic Ridiculopathy Consortium's enjoyable production features a large, lively cast on a too-small stage. This comedy of ideas concerns many misalliances: people engaged to marry the wrong people, parents and their adult children misunderstanding each other, the wrongheaded government and its beleaguered citizens, the smart moneymakers and the aristocratic money-inheritors, and one of Shaw's favorite themes: the old-fashioned woman and the "new woman.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 24, 2015 | By Toby Zinman, For The Inquirer
Noel Coward's delectable 1930 comedy Private Lives , now at the Walnut Street Theatre, is what every romcom aspires to be: laugh-out-loud funny, sexy, rambunctious, and complete with a happy ending preceded by bad behavior. Here are characters whose dialogue is clever and naughty as opposed to their contemporary versions, who often seem dopey and vulgar. The play requires everyone to be veddy, veddy English, knowing all the while that it is all veddy veddy. Here's the setup: Amanda (Kathleen Wallace)
NEWS
January 18, 2015 | By Wendy Rosenfield, For The Inquirer
David Mamet's A Life in the Theatre arrives at Walnut Street Theatre's Independence Studio 3 at just the right time. After a month when the world has been awash in horrors, this small backstage comedy gets back to basics and celebrates the people (two of them, anyway) who, for our escapist pleasure, make their lives out of make-believe. This play premiered in 1977, and you can practically feel the energy of Mamet's early successes, as he turns theater conventions inside out, all while working firmly within them.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 6, 2014 | By Monica Peters, For The Inquirer
Enjoy holiday shopping and fun on Saturday while benefiting a good cause at the Jingle Fest Holiday Craft Bazaar & Family Fun Festival at Greater Philadelphia Expo Center at Oaks. There are activities for the whole family, including Fido - featured are face painting, a moon bounce, pet Peach the pony, and spin-wheel games. Guests can paint a horseshoe and get on a giant slide. Santa, Frozen characters Elsa and Olaf, and Mickey and Minnie Mouse will visit. The expo will have an abundance of food and crafts and other items for purchase.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 29, 2014 | By Michael Harrington, Inquirer Staff Writer
It's truly the most wonderful time of the year. No, not Black Friday - put the shopping bag down, step away from the cash register, and consider what else the Christmas season has to offer in music, dance, on stage, and, well, everywhere. This year's cornucopia of holiday entertainment offers just about anything - even a use for that ugly sweater someone is even now taking off a rack to put in a colorful wrapped box with a bow and a tag that says For You . Aaahhh! Let's think of fun instead.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 10, 2014 | By Samantha Melamed, Inquirer Staff Writer
When the power was shut off at the Walnut Street Theatre's Port Richmond scenic and prop shop a few years ago, it could have meant trouble. But, there in the dark, producing artistic director Bernard Havard saw an opportunity. It turned out the landlord hadn't been paying the utility bills or the mortgage. So, rather than risk eviction, the Walnut bought the building - more than tripling its space from 24,000 to 85,000 square feet. "To be able to control our own destiny has always been a priority for me," Havard said.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 8, 2014
YOU MAY still be munching on Halloween candy, but like it or not, the holiday season is here. Certainly retailers are already on the case, and so is the region's theater community, which has a diverse menu of offerings ready for serving. As always, the fare includes both the season-specific (the annual staging of "A Christmas Carol" at Princeton University's McCarter Theatre) and the family-friendly ("Mary Poppins" at the Walnut Street Theatre; " Rodgers & Hammerstein 's Cinderella" at the Academy of Music)
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