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Walter Bahr

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June 7, 1990 | By Jere Longman, Inquirer Staff Writer
Walter Bahr has finally gotten his name back. For years, it was Walter Bahr, father of Chris and Matt, the Penn State and NFL placekickers. His sons' names were always attached, like a tail to a kite. Now he is simply Walter Bahr again. In 1950, a kick by Bahr produced the biggest upset in World Cup history. Some call it the biggest upset in the history of soccer. Given the placid surface of soccer in this country, that 1-0 victory over England hardly caused a ripple in the United States.
SPORTS
January 19, 2006 | By Marc Narducci INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Walter Bahr has seen the game of soccer grow from all vantage points, as a player who achieved World Cup fame, to a successful head coach at Temple and Penn State. His accomplished career earned him a spot in 1976 in the National Soccer Hall of Fame. At age 78, Bahr realizes that times change, but he feels that not only soccer, but many youth sports are going about developing players in the wrong manner. With so many youth soccer coaches gathering this week at the National Soccer Coaches Association of America (NSCAA)
SPORTS
February 28, 2008 | By Jeff Gammage INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
After nearly 60 years, Walter Bahr can still see the play unfold, the movement and timing of his pass that set up the most historic goal in American soccer: The game-winner in the U.S. team's 1-0 upset of heavily favored England in the 1950 World Cup. "Nothing fancy," Bahr said yesterday, recalling his storied cross to a teammate, from his home in Boalsburg, Pa. Bahr, nearly 81, plans to be among hundreds who will gather today to...
SPORTS
June 19, 2002 | By Mike Jensen INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Walter Bahr had planned to sleep through the night, then catch a replay of the World Cup game between the United States and Mexico when it was shown Monday afternoon. But like a lot of soccer fans, he found himself waking up at 2 a.m. Monday and turning on the television. Then he stayed riveted as a thread of U.S. soccer history unspooled. Bahr is part of that history. He is Philadelphia's great contribution to World Cup lore. It was his shot that was redirected into England's net by a teammate, giving the U.S. team a titanic 1-0 upset at the 1950 World Cup. The World Cup was a whole different deal back then.
SPORTS
March 27, 1998 | By Roger Allaway, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The Kixx will open the National Professional Soccer League playoffs at home on April 4, and it appears likely that their opponent will be the Harrisburg Heat, whom they play in their regular-season finale at 7:30 p.m. tomorrow at the CoreStates Spectrum. Philadelphia will play a best-of-three conference semifinal series against either Harrisburg or the Cleveland Crunch, whichever finishes with the better regular-season record. At the moment, the Heat have the edge in that race.
NEWS
April 23, 2010 | By Claudia Vargas INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Joseph A. Brown Jr., 65, of Audubon, Camden County, founder of the Audubon Soccer Club, died of a heart attack Thursday, April 15, at his home. When Mr. Brown attended Frankfort High School in Philadelphia in the early 1960s, his gym and soccer coach was Walter Bahr, a former professional soccer player and U.S. Olympian. "Walter Bahr took him under his wing," said Mr. Brown's daughter, Jennifer. "And he just loved [soccer] from then on. " After graduating from high school in 1962, Mr. Brown was drafted into the Army and sent to work at the Tripler Army Medical Center in Honolulu, where he remained for two years.
NEWS
September 3, 1994 | By Mike Jensen, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Walt Chyzowych, a former all-America soccer player at Temple University and coach of Philadelphia Textile and the United States national team, died yesterday after collapsing during a tennis match in Winston-Salem, N.C., where he coached the Wake Forest soccer team. Mr. Chyzowych, 57, died of an apparent heart attack. He was pronounced dead at North Carolina Baptist Hospital about an hour after collapsing on the Wake Forest campus. Mr. Chyzowych had been at Wake Forest since 1986.
SPORTS
June 7, 2006 | By FRANK BERTUCCI For the Daily News
WALTER BAHR was a superstar in Kensington. Growing up there before World War II, Bahr was a soccer star for the Lighthouse Boys Club and Frankford High School, eventually captaining the U.S. Olympic team in London in 1948. That was American soccer 60 years ago. The players were stars in their own neighborhoods, whether it was Kensington in Philadelphia, The Hill in St. Louis, or in Fall River, Mass. The best players knew each other because they'd see each other in regional and national tournaments, eventually making their way onto national teams.
SPORTS
June 16, 1994 | By Mike Jensen, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Just one reminder of soccer remains at what was once the crossroads of the sport in Philadelphia: the vast Lighthouse Boys Club fields at Front Street and Erie Avenue in Kensington. In the far corner, right up against a cemetery, are some stone bleachers. In their day, they could have held a few hundred people. But the last five rows have buckled and collapsed, and a huge tree is growing right through the middle of the stands. A fence surrounds the whole thing, but even the fence has holes big enough to walk through.
SPORTS
January 25, 2010 | By Jonathan Tannenwald FOR THE INQUIRER
It's been 60 years since Philadelphia native Walter Bahr secured his place in American soccer lore. Yet he still recalls in vivid detail the United States' famous 1-0 victory over England at the 1950 World Cup in Belo Horizonte, Brazil. Expect Bahr to be telling his story a lot this summer. When the United States and England face off in their 2010 World Cup opener June 12, it will be their first meeting in an international competition since Bahr's team pulled off what is still regarded as one of the great upsets in soccer history.
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SPORTS
June 1, 2015 | By Frank Fitzpatrick, Inquirer Columnist
Throughout Philadelphia's sports history, soccer has popped up sporadically, an invading virus that the city's natural indifference to the game typically manages to resist. Sometimes, as now with the Union, the outbreak is more severe. But mostly, like the rest of America, we've been immune to the sport that so infects the world. So it was jarring last week when news of a soccer-related scandal was stripped across The Inquirer's front page, even if this story's appeal was amorality and not athletics.
SPORTS
September 30, 2011
Union goalkeeper Zac MacMath has taken the traditional path to soccer, unlike his father. The younger MacMath has been playing the game since he was 4, although for the longest time he was a field player and, apparently, an accomplished one at that. Compare that to his father, Gary, recruited off the basketball court in gym class at Frankford High by legendary soccer coach Walter Bahr because the program needed a keeper. So even though Gary has been a longtime resident of St. Petersburg, Fla., his soccer roots were in Philadelphia.
NEWS
April 23, 2010 | By Claudia Vargas INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Joseph A. Brown Jr., 65, of Audubon, Camden County, founder of the Audubon Soccer Club, died of a heart attack Thursday, April 15, at his home. When Mr. Brown attended Frankfort High School in Philadelphia in the early 1960s, his gym and soccer coach was Walter Bahr, a former professional soccer player and U.S. Olympian. "Walter Bahr took him under his wing," said Mr. Brown's daughter, Jennifer. "And he just loved [soccer] from then on. " After graduating from high school in 1962, Mr. Brown was drafted into the Army and sent to work at the Tripler Army Medical Center in Honolulu, where he remained for two years.
NEWS
April 11, 2010 | By Jeff Gammage, Inquirer Staff Writer
When Philadelphia Union soccer CEO Nick Sakiewicz saw the crowds pouring into Lincoln Financial Field Saturday night, he had a thought: He should have built a bigger stadium in Chester. Because the 34,870 who cheered the return of pro soccer to Philadelphia are never going to fit into 18,500-seat PPL Park, nearing completion beside the Commodore Barry Bridge. "If we would have had more money," Sakiewicz joked. The Union's long-awaited first home game, against D.C. United, put plenty of fannies in the seats.
SPORTS
April 9, 2010 | By Marc Narducci, Inquirer Staff Writer
Union midfielder Fred has been asked a lot this week about playing his former team, D.C. United, in Saturday's 6 p.m. inaugural home game at Lincoln Financial Field. Fred has insisted that there won't be much sentimentality. He's simply happy to be back on the field. "I don't feel it is any different because for me, it's still soccer," he said. In his final game for United last season, Fred received a red card and thus had to sit out one game. That means he missed the first game in Union history, a 2-0 loss away to Seattle Sounders FC on March 25. The Union can surely use Fred's creativity in the midfield as the offense is searching for answers.
NEWS
April 9, 2010 | By Jeff Gammage, Inquirer Staff Writer
On Saturday, Philadelphia sports fans will see something they haven't seen for 30 years: a pro soccer game, played here by a hometown, major-league team. The Philadelphia Union will take the field at 6 p.m. for their inaugural home game, returning soccer to the city for the first time since 1980, when the Fury limped out of town to Montreal. "The long gap has seen a whole generation of Americans grow up on the sport," said Union chief executive officer Nick Sakiewicz, who in 1980 was a 19-year-old Olympic soccer hopeful.
SPORTS
January 25, 2010 | By Jonathan Tannenwald FOR THE INQUIRER
It's been 60 years since Philadelphia native Walter Bahr secured his place in American soccer lore. Yet he still recalls in vivid detail the United States' famous 1-0 victory over England at the 1950 World Cup in Belo Horizonte, Brazil. Expect Bahr to be telling his story a lot this summer. When the United States and England face off in their 2010 World Cup opener June 12, it will be their first meeting in an international competition since Bahr's team pulled off what is still regarded as one of the great upsets in soccer history.
SPORTS
December 5, 2009 | Daily News Wire Services
When the United States and England open their World Cup play in South Africa against each other next summer, it will - finally - be the rematch of the greatest upset in World Cup history, which took place in Brazil 60 years before. Then, in 1950, a team of rag-tag U.S. amateurs, led by Philadelphia soccer legend Walter Bahr, upset the mighty English, 1-0, in Belo Horizante. Bahr assisted on the goal, which was scored by Joe Gaetjens, a native of Haiti who was on the American team because of his friendship with some of the other players.
NEWS
February 29, 2008 | By Jeff Gammage INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
People used to joke that in the United States, soccer was the sport of the future - and always would be. When Major League Soccer arose and began a decade-long flirtation with Philadelphia, the joke took on a local dimension: Philadelphia was the once-and-forever expansion team. Yesterday, the future finally arrived. MLS commissioner Don Garber made it official during a raucous news conference in Chester, where the new team will play, his words setting off a prolonged ovation from several hundred fans and supporters at a waterfront office complex.
SPORTS
February 28, 2008 | By Jeff Gammage INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
After nearly 60 years, Walter Bahr can still see the play unfold, the movement and timing of his pass that set up the most historic goal in American soccer: The game-winner in the U.S. team's 1-0 upset of heavily favored England in the 1950 World Cup. "Nothing fancy," Bahr said yesterday, recalling his storied cross to a teammate, from his home in Boalsburg, Pa. Bahr, nearly 81, plans to be among hundreds who will gather today to...
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