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Walter Reed

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NEWS
March 10, 2007
Al Giacomucci Philadelphia al.giacomucci@acm.org Several years ago, Princeton economics professor Uwe Reinhardt counseled his son, who had decided to join the Marine Corps, thus: "Do what you must, but be advised that, flourishing rhetoric notwithstanding, this nation will never truly honor your service, and it will condemn you to the bottom of the economic scrap heap should you ever get seriously wounded. " The recent scandal at Walter Reed Army Medical Center has dramatized Reinhardt's counsel.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 3, 2007 | HOWARD GENSLER Daily News wire services contributed to this report
IT'S NOT THE lack of supplies, poor medical attention and unsanitary conditions that are the problem at Walter Reed Army Medical Center. It's Joan Baez. Thankfully, the powers that be have solved that one. In a letter to the Washington Post published yesterday, Baez said the military hospital canceled her appearance there Friday. She had been invited by John Mellencamp to perform with him. "I have always been an advocate for nonviolence and I have stood as firmly against the Iraq war as I did the Vietnam War 40 years ago," Baez wrote.
NEWS
March 9, 2007 | By Paul Krugman
When Salon, the online magazine, reported on mistreatment of veterans at the Walter Reed Army Medical Center two years ago, officials simply denied that there were any problems. And they initially tried to brush off last month's expose in the Washington Post. But this time, with President Bush's approval at 29 percent, Democrats in control of Congress, and Donald H. Rumsfeld no longer defense secretary - Robert Gates, his successor, appears genuinely distressed at the situation - the whitewash didn't stick.
NEWS
March 9, 2007
WHILE THE White House and Congress express shock and dismay at recent revelations about the Army's Walter Reed Medical Center, the problems with care for those who serve in our nation's military is no shock to those who have been through the system. And as horrific as the conditions at Walter Reed are, they represent just the tip of the iceberg. It would be a critical error for either the White House or Congress to address Walter Reed without taking the opportunity to address the larger issue: Troops and veterans are not getting the care they deserve, in both the system for active-duty soldiers, which costs about $50 billion a year, and the Veterans Health Administration, which has a budget of about $35 billion for health care for 5.3 million vets, but still generates complaints of waits for all services.
NEWS
July 28, 2011 | By Lydia Mulvany, McClatchy Newspapers
WASHINGTON - A solemn final moment came Wednesday for Walter Reed Army Medical Center when Army commanders rolled up maroon and green flags, symbols of the soul of the military unit that ran the hospital, and placed them in cloth cases, never to be unfurled again. Hundreds of soldiers and staff gathered under a white tent on a beautiful morning to observe the symbolic and funereal end of what Army Surgeon General Eric Schoomaker called "the most treasured military medical center in the world.
NEWS
August 26, 2005 | By Drew Brown INQUIRER WASHINGTON BUREAU
Soldiers from America's wars in the 20th and 21st centuries have been treated at Walter Reed Army Medical Center. Yesterday, the base-closing commission voted to shut down the hospital, saying soldiers today needed a more modern facility. Presidents, veterans and soldiers have received medical care at Walter Reed since 1909. Its campus is beautiful - some 100 rose-colored brick buildings surrounded by lawns and old trees on a large piece of land in the nation's capital. The decision on the historic hospital came as the commission votes on the hundreds of military facilities that the Pentagon is seeking to close to save money and streamline operations nationwide.
NEWS
March 6, 2007 | By Steve Young
The Walter Reed scandal was a story years in the making. A story that up until last week had been downplayed - censored, really - by the government and the military. A story kept from American voters by our pro-troop, pro-surge broadcasting Lords of Loud. If the right-wing media had broadcast the story, hidden in plain sight, with half the energy they use to excoriate the ACLU, the right's water-carriers could have helped avert years of misery for many of our veterans. Certainly the information was out there.
NEWS
November 5, 1996 | For The Inquirer / PAOLA TAGLIAMONTE
Walter Reed performs a "sneak-up dance" Sunday during a festival of Native American arts at Dreamcatchers, a Skippack store. Reed is a member of Delaware River Education Drummers and Dancers. Also featured were silversmithing, quillwork and beading.
NEWS
May 27, 2012 | Inquirer Staff Report
1. c. William Howard Taft. 2. a. Robert Todd Lincoln. 3. b. John Marshall. 4. d. Thurgood Marshall. 5. c. Medgar Evers. 6. b. Benjamin O. Davis Sr. 7. a. Anita Newcomb McGee. 8. c. Edward H. White. 9. d. Walter Reed. 10. d. 1900.
NEWS
June 18, 2006 | By Frank Greve INQUIRER WASHINGTON BUREAU
Jimmy Davis made it up from South Carolina to Walter Reed Army Medical Center half an hour before his daughter, Crystal, arrived from Landstuhl, Germany. Military doctors there had amputated her right leg below the knee after a roadside bomb blew up her tow truck in Iraq. They had also set her left leg, which had multiple fractures. That was in January. Since then, the feisty 22-year-old Army mechanic and her father have grown inseparable in the rehab units at Walter Reed.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
May 27, 2012 | Inquirer Staff Report
1. c. William Howard Taft. 2. a. Robert Todd Lincoln. 3. b. John Marshall. 4. d. Thurgood Marshall. 5. c. Medgar Evers. 6. b. Benjamin O. Davis Sr. 7. a. Anita Newcomb McGee. 8. c. Edward H. White. 9. d. Walter Reed. 10. d. 1900.
NEWS
July 28, 2011 | By Lydia Mulvany, McClatchy Newspapers
WASHINGTON - A solemn final moment came Wednesday for Walter Reed Army Medical Center when Army commanders rolled up maroon and green flags, symbols of the soul of the military unit that ran the hospital, and placed them in cloth cases, never to be unfurled again. Hundreds of soldiers and staff gathered under a white tent on a beautiful morning to observe the symbolic and funereal end of what Army Surgeon General Eric Schoomaker called "the most treasured military medical center in the world.
NEWS
July 5, 2009 | By Kevin Ferris
Kevin Hardin is home in Eddystone for the July Fourth weekend. He's visiting with his parents, Terry and Charles, and two of his three brothers, Kyle and Keith. The 23-year-old didn't grow up in the Delaware County rowhome. He's from Jupiter, Fla. The trip north has been a circuitous one, taking him from Fort Benning, Ga., to Samarra, Iraq, to Walter Reed Army Medical Center in Washington. Kevin has been at Walter Reed since Oct. 2, 2007. He arrived unconscious, about 48 hours after his humvee was hit by a rocket in Samarra.
SPORTS
June 21, 2008 | By Matt Gelb INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
One day, Dan Lasko jokes, he'll write a book on this. "If anyone asks you where you were on Sept. 11, I'll always remember where I was," Lasko said. He laughs again. Lasko, then four months removed from graduation at Easton Area High School, was in Harrisburg to be sworn into the Marines. Purely coincidence. "After I was done swearing in, I came out to watch TV and get something to eat and head off," Lasko said. "And that's when the attacks happened. " In March 2004, he was deployed to Afghanistan with the 22d Marine Expedition Unit.
NEWS
May 26, 2008 | By Michael Vitez INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Raymond D. Hennagir tightened the screws of his prosthetic legs yesterday and adjusted the suction pump so they would fit snugly. Then the Marine corporal from Deptford, injured last summer in Iraq, stood and walked. He stands 5-foot-9, the same height he was before he was blown up. He says he can walk now for 16 minutes, and he's down to using just one cane. He's determined to shed that one, too, as his balance improves. Hennagir has also, in the last few months, skied in Vail, Colo.
NEWS
May 26, 2008 | By Michael Vitez, Inquirer Staff Writer
Raymond D. Hennagir tightened the screws of his prosthetic legs yesterday and adjusted the suction pump so they would fit snugly. Then the Marine corporal from Deptford, injured last summer in Iraq, stood and walked. He stands 5-foot-9, the same height he was before he was blown up. He says he can walk now for 16 minutes, and he's down to using just one cane. He's determined to shed that one, too, as his balance improves. Hennagir has also, in the last few months, skied in Vail, Colo.
NEWS
December 26, 2007
PRESIDENT BUSH should make only one resolution in the new year: To make sure this country raises its standards on how we treat the people we ask to fight for us around the world. However depressing the news from Iraq is, it's overshadowed by even more depressing news: of how hard many veterans have to fight once they've left the battlefield - for health care, for help with the mental scars of battle, for jobs, for their homes. In recent months, reports have documented a disturbing track record in how this country treats its military heroes.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 3, 2007 | HOWARD GENSLER Daily News wire services contributed to this report
IT'S NOT THE lack of supplies, poor medical attention and unsanitary conditions that are the problem at Walter Reed Army Medical Center. It's Joan Baez. Thankfully, the powers that be have solved that one. In a letter to the Washington Post published yesterday, Baez said the military hospital canceled her appearance there Friday. She had been invited by John Mellencamp to perform with him. "I have always been an advocate for nonviolence and I have stood as firmly against the Iraq war as I did the Vietnam War 40 years ago," Baez wrote.
NEWS
March 31, 2007 | Daily News wire services
Bush apologizes to soldiers for Walter Reed conditions President Bush apologized yesterday for the shoddy conditions at Walter Reed Army Medical Center and promised during a visit to the facility for war veterans that "we're going to fix the problem. " Bush toured the main hospital and Abrams Hall, where soldiers were transferred after they were vacated from the facility's Building 18, the site of moldy walls, rodent infestation and other problems that went unchecked until reported by the media.
NEWS
March 14, 2007 | By Tom Avril, Edward Colimore and Tom Infield INQUIRER STAFF WRITERS
Mark Lachance refuses to drive anymore, and doesn't even like being a passenger. He gets anxious at red lights and hates traveling in an outer lane. "My heart begins racing," he said. Riding in a car reminds Lachance too much of riding a humvee in Iraq, where his Army vehicle was rocked twice by explosions from roadside bombs. Lachance, 25, is happy now to be in Philadelphia, where he can walk or take the train. And where he can call a mental-health professional day or night at the Philadelphia VA Medical Center, a place he has been half-a-dozen times to grapple with migraines and post-traumatic stress disorder.
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