IN THE NEWS

War

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
April 10, 2008
SO OBAMA didn't make the obligatory stop at Pat's or Geno's. I applaud him on skipping the two tourist traps that are the McDonald's and Burger King of cheesesteaks in the city. There are other joints to get a great cheesesteak, including Jim's, D'Allessandro's and John's Roast Pork. Bryan Flannery, Chalfont
NEWS
March 15, 2007
WHAT IS HAPPENING to our city? A soldier had to come home from the war to bury his mother. He's been in the Army for 16 years and the last two, he's been defending our country and protecting us against the terrorists. Unfortunately, while he was over in Iraq, no one was looking out for his mother. She was a woman who worked hard trying to make a living for her family, a mother who raised five children, 17 grandchildren, 10 great-grandchildren - and all she wanted was a ride home.
NEWS
December 4, 1990
Bejamin Frankin offered his thoughts on the efficacy of war in a letter to one of his sisters written from Philadelphia in 1787. It was selected by Roy Goodman, research librarian of the American Philosophical Society. I agree with you perfectly in your disapprobation of war. Abstracted from the inhumanity of it, I think it is wrong in point of human prudence, for whatever advantage one nation would obtain from another, whether it be part of their territory, the liberty of commerce with them, free passage on their rivers, etc., etc., it would be much cheaper to purchase such advantage with ready money than to pay the expence of acquiring it by war. An army is a devouring monster . . . when you have raised it, you have not only the fair charges of pay, clothing, provision, arms and ammunition, with numberless other contingent and just charges to answer and satisfy, but you have all the additional knavish charges of the numerous tribe of contractors . . . (who take)
NEWS
April 21, 2003
COLUMNIST Michael Kinsley wonders what an honest opponent of the war should do now (OpEd, April 16). First, most of the organized antiwar groups aren't honest - they are the Socialist Workers Party and the free-Mumia crazies on the far left. Others, though, might admit that they were wrong, and question their weakness of character in always opposing their country. Finally, the Hollywood antiwar crowd like Tim Robbins and Mike Farrell might opt for the ancient Japanese rite of contrition called hara-kiri.
NEWS
June 2, 1995 | Associated Press, KRT Graphics, Defense Dept., United Nations; DAILY NEWS GRAPHIC
Any attempt to rescue the hostages by force would be "an absurd, catastrophic mistake. " - Bosnian Serb leader Radovan Karadzic On sending U.S. troops: "As long as the mission was strictly limited for a very narrow purpose and it was something that we could do for them that they couldn't do for themselves, upon proper consultation with Congress, I would be inclined to do that. " - President Clinton "The U.N. mission in Bosnia has failed. It must be withdrawn and the U.S. should not refuse to assist in its withdrawal.
NEWS
January 27, 1991 | By David Zucchino, Inquirer Washington Bureau
After the first 24 hours, there was the illusion that this war would be easy. But there was a nagging sensation that the antiseptic, technology- controlled script the White House and Pentagon had created was too clean. The euphoria is gone. Now, 11 days into the war, the White House is warning that the conflict may be long and bloody. What America has seen is not the war itself, but the illusion of war. It is war by briefing, not battle. Satellite TV can relay the life and death of a smart bomb, but the war below remains inscrutable.
NEWS
February 12, 2003
I am writing about the people who are protesting against the war. I think that our President knows what he is doing. . . . All of the protesting is just making his job harder. Anthony Conway There must be other options beside war. I feel President Bush is seeking revenge for, or to complete, what his father was unable to complete. This is the wrong reason for war. Ashley Taylor The writers are juniors at Mercy Vocational High School in Philadelphia.
NEWS
November 10, 2006
SIGNE WILKINSON'S Nov. 8 "Stop the War" editorial cartoon accurately depicts the election results as a clear referendum on the war in Iraq. Nevertheless, her analysis is dead wrong on two fronts. First, Republicans and Democrats alike evidently voted for a change in U.S. policy in Iraq. So the words "Stop the War" ought to be purple. Using blue, over a red map of the U.S., perpetuates a false dichotomy of the electorate with regard to Iraq. Second, the cartoon implies that those who voted Democrat want the war to end, regardless of the situation on the ground.
NEWS
January 31, 2003
HAS ANYONE considered researching how many presidents since FDR have had sons of eligible draft age? Almost every president has had some dealings with war. However, none, to my knowledge, has had sons who enlisted, fought or were eligible to fight in an existing war during their term. Most presidents, Kennedy excluded (John was only 3), had daughters. I believe presidents, congressmen and senators would exhibit a different mind-set if their sons were going off to war. Regina Powell, Lansdowne
NEWS
August 22, 1991 | Special to The Inquirer / CHERIE KEMPER-STARNER
Members of the Rolling Thunder Pa. group rode from Phoenixville to the Vietnam Veterans Memorial in Washington, D.C., Saturday. The group brought back etchings of the names of the eight Phoenixville men who were killed in the war. They will be part of the area's planned Vietnam memorial.
1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
November 19, 2014 | Inquirer Editorial Board
Is the technology-powered transportation network UberX a dangerous "illegal hack taxi" service, as Philadelphia Parking Authority chieftain Vince Fenerty quaintly insisted in a recent Inquirer op-ed? Or is it a forward-looking taxi alternative that, as a spokesman insists, merely provides "the safe and reliable rides that Pennsylvanians need and deserve"? According to a paradoxical Public Utility Commission ruling last week, it's both. The commission gave Uber, the San Francisco-based company whose low-cost ride-sharing network is called UberX, a two-year license to provide its presumably safe and reliable rides throughout most of the commonwealth.
NEWS
November 16, 2014 | By Dylan Purcell and Mike Newall, Inquirer Staff Writers
In a split verdict, a former Philadelphia police officer was acquitted Friday of falsely imprisoning a man in Center City last year. Kevin Corcoran was also found not guilty on charges of official oppression, but the jury found him guilty of a misdemeanor charge of obstruction. Corcoran, who was a 10-year veteran, sat quietly in the courtroom in a dark-blue suit while jurors deliberated into the afternoon over charges that he handcuffed and improperly detained Roderick King of Lansdale, an Air Force veteran.
NEWS
November 15, 2014 | BY MENSAH M. DEAN, Daily News Staff Writer deanm@phillynews.com, 215-568-8278
A Philadelphia jury on Friday convicted former police officer Kevin Corcoran of obstructing justice, a charge that stems from his heated arrest and quick release of an Iraqi War veteran last year. The Common Pleas Court jury of five women and seven men found Corcoran not guilty of two other charges - false imprisonment and official oppression. Corcoran, 34, a 10-year police veteran at the time of his dismissal in March, could receive up to 1-to-2 years in jail when sentenced Jan. 9 by Judge Robert Coleman.
NEWS
November 14, 2014 | BY MENSAH M. DEAN, Daily News Staff Writer deanm@phillynews.com, 215-568-8278
FORMER Philadelphia police officer Kevin Corcoran, who was fired after making a questionable arrest during a traffic altercation last year, was either a "rogue" cop or an "innocent man" just trying to get home safely to his family. The conflicting portrayals of Corcoran, 34, came during opening statements yesterday in Common Pleas Court, where he is being tried for obstructing the administration of law, official oppression and false imprisonment. The man Corcoran handcuffed and drove to a dark Center City alley at 2 a.m. March 31, 2013, testified that he did nothing illegal and that he felt he was at "the mercy" of an enraged cop. "I was worried because of the way he was acting," said Roderick King, 31. "I was scared that I was not safe.
NEWS
November 11, 2014 | By Michael Matza, Inquirer Staff Writer
One in an occasional series on America's changing face Annonciata Nsenga kicked off her sneakers, stood on a chair, and tapped a nail into a wall of her rented rowhouse in Point Breeze. Eighteen years after she and her husband, Jean Pierre, both Congolese, fled their homeland's violence for a refugee camp in Rwanda - and five months into their new lives in Philadelphia - the rail-thin mother of five finally felt comfortable enough to hang a fresh portrait of the family, dressed nattily, smiling hopefully.
NEWS
November 10, 2014 | By Michael Milne, For The Inquirer
I was strolling along Bernauer Strasse during a foggy night typical of Berlin. The low-lying mist shrouded the streetlamps, casting sepia shadows on the neighborhood. The hues were reminiscent of old newsreels from August 1963, when this street became a last-gasp escape route for those seeking to flee over the Berlin Wall, a structure that was erected overnight in its initial crude form of concrete blocks and barbed wire. It encircled West Berlin to keep East Germans from escaping to the lone outpost of freedom behind the Iron Curtain.
NEWS
November 8, 2014
BREAK OUT the Hershey bars and nylons, the war on women is over! Yes, indeed, folks, the hostile aggression against 51 percent of the population by that pseudo-cabal of old men, Supreme Court justices (who are old men) and women-who-can-no-longer-reproduce is over, and we can celebrate the great electoral victory that has delivered us from Republican evil. What's that you say? The wrong side won? The GOP vanquished those valiant defenders of our ovaries? Can it be that we are destined to remain in that reproductive, mommy-track bondage that has stripped us of our humanity?
NEWS
November 4, 2014 | BY JOHN F. MORRISON, Daily News Staff Writer morrisj@phillynews.com, 215-854-5573
ROBERT BERGHAIER probably could have been a writer or an artist. He didn't take up either trade, but his son, Robert, said his father, a veteran of two wars, had a discerning eye. "He was very observant," his son said. "He had a very good eye and a gift for being very descriptive. He could process information and tell you exactly what happened. " What happened to Robert Berghaier might have made a good book. He and his son would sit around the kitchen table and the elder Berghaier would regale his son with stories of his adventures, down to the smallest detail.
NEWS
November 1, 2014 | By Edward Colimore, Inquirer Staff Writer
  On the steep slopes of Nui Chom, North Vietnamese soldiers were waiting in a stronghold of jungle-obscured bunkers, all of them bristling with machine guns. They trained their barrels on an approaching squad of Americans in 1968, then unleashed a storm of automatic gunfire that quickly killed two soldiers and pinned down the rest. That's when Michael J. Crescenz, 19, of Philadelphia, picked up an M60 machine gun and single-handedly rushed the bunkers, taking out three of them and killing six enemy soldiers.
1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
|
|
|
|
|