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NEWS
April 10, 2008
SO OBAMA didn't make the obligatory stop at Pat's or Geno's. I applaud him on skipping the two tourist traps that are the McDonald's and Burger King of cheesesteaks in the city. There are other joints to get a great cheesesteak, including Jim's, D'Allessandro's and John's Roast Pork. Bryan Flannery, Chalfont
NEWS
March 15, 2007
WHAT IS HAPPENING to our city? A soldier had to come home from the war to bury his mother. He's been in the Army for 16 years and the last two, he's been defending our country and protecting us against the terrorists. Unfortunately, while he was over in Iraq, no one was looking out for his mother. She was a woman who worked hard trying to make a living for her family, a mother who raised five children, 17 grandchildren, 10 great-grandchildren - and all she wanted was a ride home.
NEWS
December 4, 1990
Bejamin Frankin offered his thoughts on the efficacy of war in a letter to one of his sisters written from Philadelphia in 1787. It was selected by Roy Goodman, research librarian of the American Philosophical Society. I agree with you perfectly in your disapprobation of war. Abstracted from the inhumanity of it, I think it is wrong in point of human prudence, for whatever advantage one nation would obtain from another, whether it be part of their territory, the liberty of commerce with them, free passage on their rivers, etc., etc., it would be much cheaper to purchase such advantage with ready money than to pay the expence of acquiring it by war. An army is a devouring monster . . . when you have raised it, you have not only the fair charges of pay, clothing, provision, arms and ammunition, with numberless other contingent and just charges to answer and satisfy, but you have all the additional knavish charges of the numerous tribe of contractors . . . (who take)
NEWS
April 21, 2003
COLUMNIST Michael Kinsley wonders what an honest opponent of the war should do now (OpEd, April 16). First, most of the organized antiwar groups aren't honest - they are the Socialist Workers Party and the free-Mumia crazies on the far left. Others, though, might admit that they were wrong, and question their weakness of character in always opposing their country. Finally, the Hollywood antiwar crowd like Tim Robbins and Mike Farrell might opt for the ancient Japanese rite of contrition called hara-kiri.
NEWS
June 2, 1995 | Associated Press, KRT Graphics, Defense Dept., United Nations; DAILY NEWS GRAPHIC
Any attempt to rescue the hostages by force would be "an absurd, catastrophic mistake. " - Bosnian Serb leader Radovan Karadzic On sending U.S. troops: "As long as the mission was strictly limited for a very narrow purpose and it was something that we could do for them that they couldn't do for themselves, upon proper consultation with Congress, I would be inclined to do that. " - President Clinton "The U.N. mission in Bosnia has failed. It must be withdrawn and the U.S. should not refuse to assist in its withdrawal.
NEWS
January 27, 1991 | By David Zucchino, Inquirer Washington Bureau
After the first 24 hours, there was the illusion that this war would be easy. But there was a nagging sensation that the antiseptic, technology- controlled script the White House and Pentagon had created was too clean. The euphoria is gone. Now, 11 days into the war, the White House is warning that the conflict may be long and bloody. What America has seen is not the war itself, but the illusion of war. It is war by briefing, not battle. Satellite TV can relay the life and death of a smart bomb, but the war below remains inscrutable.
NEWS
February 12, 2003
I am writing about the people who are protesting against the war. I think that our President knows what he is doing. . . . All of the protesting is just making his job harder. Anthony Conway There must be other options beside war. I feel President Bush is seeking revenge for, or to complete, what his father was unable to complete. This is the wrong reason for war. Ashley Taylor The writers are juniors at Mercy Vocational High School in Philadelphia.
NEWS
November 10, 2006
SIGNE WILKINSON'S Nov. 8 "Stop the War" editorial cartoon accurately depicts the election results as a clear referendum on the war in Iraq. Nevertheless, her analysis is dead wrong on two fronts. First, Republicans and Democrats alike evidently voted for a change in U.S. policy in Iraq. So the words "Stop the War" ought to be purple. Using blue, over a red map of the U.S., perpetuates a false dichotomy of the electorate with regard to Iraq. Second, the cartoon implies that those who voted Democrat want the war to end, regardless of the situation on the ground.
NEWS
January 31, 2003
HAS ANYONE considered researching how many presidents since FDR have had sons of eligible draft age? Almost every president has had some dealings with war. However, none, to my knowledge, has had sons who enlisted, fought or were eligible to fight in an existing war during their term. Most presidents, Kennedy excluded (John was only 3), had daughters. I believe presidents, congressmen and senators would exhibit a different mind-set if their sons were going off to war. Regina Powell, Lansdowne
NEWS
August 22, 1991 | Special to The Inquirer / CHERIE KEMPER-STARNER
Members of the Rolling Thunder Pa. group rode from Phoenixville to the Vietnam Veterans Memorial in Washington, D.C., Saturday. The group brought back etchings of the names of the eight Phoenixville men who were killed in the war. They will be part of the area's planned Vietnam memorial.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
October 9, 2014 | BY GREGORY A. DADDIS
AS THE United States charges once more into war, little debate has centered on the actual utility of war. Instead, policymakers and pundits have focused their comments on combating the latest danger to our nation and its interests as posed by Islamic State militants. In late August, Secretary of Defense Chuck Hagel claimed that Islamic State was an "imminent threat to every interest we have" and that the sophisticated group was "beyond anything we've seen. " With few dissenting voices, either in Congress or in the American media, U.S. air forces plunged again into the unstable region of the Middle East.
NEWS
October 8, 2014 | By Kristen A. Graham and Martha Woodall, Inquirer Staff Writers
By activating its nuclear option and cancelling its teachers' contract, the Philadelphia School Reform Commission took an action Monday that could remake the city's schools and have national implications. The unilateral step at a morning meeting has already set off a battle. The Philadelphia Federation of Teachers received no advance word of the action - a unanimous vote taken at an SRC meeting called with minimal notice. The move will likely result in a legal challenge to the takeover law the SRC believes gives it the power to bypass negotiations and impose terms.
NEWS
October 4, 2014 | By Kelly Flynn, Inquirer Staff Writer
For nearly 70 years, a mystery plagued the Jaworski family. On Sept. 10, 1944, Conshohocken native Stephen Jaworski was killed in action while serving in the U.S. Army during World War II. For the family of nine children, of which Stephen was the oldest, closure never came because they did not know where or how Jaworski died. Despite never having met him, Stephen's niece, Dorothy Jaworski, took it upon herself to solve this family mystery. Her research would not only result in a book about her uncle's exploits but a pathway in France named after her late uncle.
NEWS
October 1, 2014 | By Jeff Gammage, Inquirer Staff Writer
Despite a decade of periodic searches, including inquiries by a Philadelphia detective, no one has located Little Ty. He was a soldier sent from Philadelphia to Vietnam in 1967, with the war in full fight and casualties mounting. All that remains - all that can be found - is the message he scrawled on the bunk of the troop ship that carried him to war. And the voices of men who shared the dread and boredom of similar voyages. "You're semi-relaxed because you're not in the war yet," said Army veteran George Stankovich, 67, of Matawan, N.J., "but you're nervous because you know you're going to be there.
NEWS
September 26, 2014
IT TOOK documentarian Ken Burns more than 11 hours to document the devastation of the Civil War. It took the creators of "The Civil War - The Musical" about a fifth of that time to convey with equal power and intensity, the story of the defining episode in our nation's history. There is much to praise about the production at Hammonton's Eagle Theatre, which runs through Oct. 5, beginning with the surprisingly solid and affecting score, which defies major expectations. Going in, the idea of recounting such a brutal and universally destructive event via contemporary musical formats, including rock and country, seemed frivolous and lightweight at best, trivializing and disrespectful at worst.
SPORTS
September 25, 2014 | BY AARON CARTER, Daily News Staff Writer cartera@phillynews.com
THERE ARE some questions that seniors in high school should never have to ask. Questions that are deep, philosophical and largely unanswerable. Queries that can, if you let them, stunt your growth, stifle your ambition or paralyze your progression. However, for Haverford School senior running back and linebacker Phil Poquie, a single question and all its permutations, weigh heavily on his mind, but also spur him toward success. When civil war erupted in his native Liberia, Poquie was just 2 years old. His family fled to the United States, sent for by a grandfather who lived in Staten Island, N.Y., to begin life anew, rich with possibilities.
NEWS
September 21, 2014 | By Stacey Burling, Inquirer Staff Writer
One of the casualties of Syria's civil war is history. Five of the country's six World Heritage sites have "significant damage" and some buildings have been "reduced to rubble," according to a new report that includes work by University of Pennsylvania experts. The report, which was released this week, relied on high-resolution satellite photos to chronicle damage to mosques, Roman buildings, and a Byzantine castle. The Geospatial Technologies and Human Rights Project of the American Association for the Advancement of Science wrote the assessment with help from the Penn Cultural Heritage Center at Penn's Museum of Archaeology and Anthropology, the Smithsonian Institution, and the Syrian Heritage Task Force.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 20, 2014 | By Tirdad Derakhshani, Inquirer Staff Writer
We usually hear about the previous century's two worldwide conflagrations as separate events. But what if we studied World War I and World War II in continuity with each other as part of one historical wave - a wave that saw the death of more than 88 million people. This is the approach taken by the makers of History channel's World Wars , a unique 270-minute documentary mini-series that looks at the three decades between 1914 and 1945 in unison. After all, as historians have argued, Adolf Hitler's worldview was deeply shaped by Germany's defeat in WWI and the humiliating armistice it was forced to sign.
NEWS
August 31, 2014 | By Kristin E. Holmes, Inquirer Staff Writer
The worn, leather-bound diaries, each about the size of a smartphone, reveal a voice rarely found in print. In them, Emilie Davis, a young housekeeper and seamstress, chronicles her life as a free black woman in Philadelphia during the Civil War. "To day has bin a memorable day and i thank god i have bin sperd to see it," Davis wrote in an entry dated Jan. 1, 1863, the day the Emancipation Proclamation became official. It is the first sentence in a series that fills three pocket diaries, recounting Davis' life from 1863 to 1865.
NEWS
August 25, 2014 | By Michael Matza, Inquirer Staff Writer
A child struggling for breath after a nerve-gas attack; a nurse attending to victims of barrel bombs; the tears of a Syrian doctor after a missile destroyed his hospital. Such are the images that haunt the days and nights of Rim Albezem, president of the Philadelphia chapter of the Syrian American Medical Society (SAMS), a humanitarian-aid group of medical professionals of Syrian descent. "People have the capacity to be very, very monstrous," Albezem said Tuesday, the same day Islamic State extremists released a video depicting the decapitation of American journalist James Foley, who was abducted in Syria two years ago. SAMS wants to be an antidote, said Albezem, 46. "It shows the capacity for good.
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