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NEWS
April 10, 2008
SO OBAMA didn't make the obligatory stop at Pat's or Geno's. I applaud him on skipping the two tourist traps that are the McDonald's and Burger King of cheesesteaks in the city. There are other joints to get a great cheesesteak, including Jim's, D'Allessandro's and John's Roast Pork. Bryan Flannery, Chalfont
NEWS
March 15, 2007
WHAT IS HAPPENING to our city? A soldier had to come home from the war to bury his mother. He's been in the Army for 16 years and the last two, he's been defending our country and protecting us against the terrorists. Unfortunately, while he was over in Iraq, no one was looking out for his mother. She was a woman who worked hard trying to make a living for her family, a mother who raised five children, 17 grandchildren, 10 great-grandchildren - and all she wanted was a ride home.
NEWS
December 4, 1990
Bejamin Frankin offered his thoughts on the efficacy of war in a letter to one of his sisters written from Philadelphia in 1787. It was selected by Roy Goodman, research librarian of the American Philosophical Society. I agree with you perfectly in your disapprobation of war. Abstracted from the inhumanity of it, I think it is wrong in point of human prudence, for whatever advantage one nation would obtain from another, whether it be part of their territory, the liberty of commerce with them, free passage on their rivers, etc., etc., it would be much cheaper to purchase such advantage with ready money than to pay the expence of acquiring it by war. An army is a devouring monster . . . when you have raised it, you have not only the fair charges of pay, clothing, provision, arms and ammunition, with numberless other contingent and just charges to answer and satisfy, but you have all the additional knavish charges of the numerous tribe of contractors . . . (who take)
NEWS
April 21, 2003
COLUMNIST Michael Kinsley wonders what an honest opponent of the war should do now (OpEd, April 16). First, most of the organized antiwar groups aren't honest - they are the Socialist Workers Party and the free-Mumia crazies on the far left. Others, though, might admit that they were wrong, and question their weakness of character in always opposing their country. Finally, the Hollywood antiwar crowd like Tim Robbins and Mike Farrell might opt for the ancient Japanese rite of contrition called hara-kiri.
NEWS
June 2, 1995 | Associated Press, KRT Graphics, Defense Dept., United Nations; DAILY NEWS GRAPHIC
Any attempt to rescue the hostages by force would be "an absurd, catastrophic mistake. " - Bosnian Serb leader Radovan Karadzic On sending U.S. troops: "As long as the mission was strictly limited for a very narrow purpose and it was something that we could do for them that they couldn't do for themselves, upon proper consultation with Congress, I would be inclined to do that. " - President Clinton "The U.N. mission in Bosnia has failed. It must be withdrawn and the U.S. should not refuse to assist in its withdrawal.
NEWS
January 27, 1991 | By David Zucchino, Inquirer Washington Bureau
After the first 24 hours, there was the illusion that this war would be easy. But there was a nagging sensation that the antiseptic, technology- controlled script the White House and Pentagon had created was too clean. The euphoria is gone. Now, 11 days into the war, the White House is warning that the conflict may be long and bloody. What America has seen is not the war itself, but the illusion of war. It is war by briefing, not battle. Satellite TV can relay the life and death of a smart bomb, but the war below remains inscrutable.
NEWS
February 12, 2003
I am writing about the people who are protesting against the war. I think that our President knows what he is doing. . . . All of the protesting is just making his job harder. Anthony Conway There must be other options beside war. I feel President Bush is seeking revenge for, or to complete, what his father was unable to complete. This is the wrong reason for war. Ashley Taylor The writers are juniors at Mercy Vocational High School in Philadelphia.
NEWS
November 10, 2006
SIGNE WILKINSON'S Nov. 8 "Stop the War" editorial cartoon accurately depicts the election results as a clear referendum on the war in Iraq. Nevertheless, her analysis is dead wrong on two fronts. First, Republicans and Democrats alike evidently voted for a change in U.S. policy in Iraq. So the words "Stop the War" ought to be purple. Using blue, over a red map of the U.S., perpetuates a false dichotomy of the electorate with regard to Iraq. Second, the cartoon implies that those who voted Democrat want the war to end, regardless of the situation on the ground.
NEWS
January 31, 2003
HAS ANYONE considered researching how many presidents since FDR have had sons of eligible draft age? Almost every president has had some dealings with war. However, none, to my knowledge, has had sons who enlisted, fought or were eligible to fight in an existing war during their term. Most presidents, Kennedy excluded (John was only 3), had daughters. I believe presidents, congressmen and senators would exhibit a different mind-set if their sons were going off to war. Regina Powell, Lansdowne
NEWS
August 22, 1991 | Special to The Inquirer / CHERIE KEMPER-STARNER
Members of the Rolling Thunder Pa. group rode from Phoenixville to the Vietnam Veterans Memorial in Washington, D.C., Saturday. The group brought back etchings of the names of the eight Phoenixville men who were killed in the war. They will be part of the area's planned Vietnam memorial.
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SPORTS
February 27, 2015 | BY TOM MAHON, Daily News Staff Writer mahont@phillynews.com
GABE POLSKY loves hockey. Got good at it. Played at Yale. Wasn't good enough to play in the NHL, which is just as well. "I can't watch it," he told the Daily News yesterday. "It's chippy and choppy, and they can barely complete three passes in a row. " Polsky likes his hockey fast and fluid, which is part of the reason he wrote and directed the critically acclaimed "Red Army" documentary that opens tomorrow at the Ritz Five in Society Hill. Another reason is he's the son of Russian immigrants who, he said, came to America with "$500 and two suitcases.
NEWS
February 22, 2015 | By Jeremy Roebuck, Inquirer Staff Writer
The picture painted by federal prosecutors is worthy of a spy novel: Globe-hopping trips to clandestine meetings in luxury hotels. Coded ledgers tracking cash bribes shoved into shopping bags. Raucous parties involving drugs, alcohol, and prostitutes. These were the methods by which Montgomery County military contractor George H. Lee Jr. hustled for poorly monitored government business during the Iraq war's early days. On Friday, Lee, 71, chairman of Kuwait-based Lee Dynamics International, pleaded guilty to bribery charges, the latest development in a years-long investigation aimed at exposing fraud and graft that emerged in the 2003 run-up to the war. So far, five high-ranking Army officers tied to Lee have admitted accepting $1.2 million in cash, jewelry, spa treatments, and hotel stays in exchange for steering $20 million in contracts his way. Stoop-shouldered and hoarse, Lee entered his plea in a federal courtroom in Philadelphia two months after Thai immigration agents detained him in what prosecutors say was an attempt to flee from justice.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 19, 2015 | By David Patrick Stearns, Inquirer Music Critic
American justice at its sorriest might well have been the internment of West Coast Japanese Americans following the bombing of Pearl Harbor and throughout World War II. The conditions involved barracks, barbed wire and guards in remote corners of land that nobody wanted. One can only imagine the psychological degradation among Japanese emigrants and their children still making their way into the American economy. Nonetheless, compliance was nearly 100 percent. One significant exception was Gordon Hirabayashi, who was intelligent, educated, articulate, seemingly amiable but hardly a firebrand activist, and definitely not court savvy.
NEWS
February 10, 2015 | By Edward Colimore, Inquirer Staff Writer
Tillman Valentine didn't know the hard times he'd face when he enlisted in the Army that morning of June 30, 1863. He was a black man in a country at war with itself over slavery and state's rights. Emotions were running high as Confederate forces invaded Pennsylvania, where a great battle - the bloodiest of the Civil War - was about to be fought at Gettysburg. Valentine bade an affectionate goodbye to his pregnant wife, Annie, and their three children in West Chester and headed to Camp William Penn, the first and largest federal training ground for black soldiers, just north of Philadelphia.
NEWS
February 8, 2015 | BY LARA WITT, Daily News Staff Writer wittl@phillynews.com, 215-854-5927
FORMER Philadelphia Police officer Kevin Corcoran walked into court yesterday facing up two years in prison for a conviction stemming from his undocumented arrest of an Iraqi War veteran in March 2013. But hours later, he walked out - practically a free man - after a judge sentenced him to one day in prison for obstruction of justice. Before sentencing, Common Pleas Judge Robert P. Coleman cited Corcoran's "stellar" career prior to his arrest in the case, saying that given the charges, the recommended sentence of two to 23 months in prison was unfair.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 7, 2015
  Williams yanks Iraq story OK, what? Brian Williams , tall, slim, hair-in-place perma-tanned prevaricator? Man of trust? News anchor for NBC? Heir to Tom Brokaw , Chet Huntley , and David Brinkley ? Now just another celebrity fibber? Gosh, we hope not. On Wednesday, B-Will had to withdraw claims he made in a Friday show, that he was in a helicopter shot down by rocket-propelled grenades in Iraq, where he went to report in 2003. He said American soldiers rescued him and his news team from the downed chopper.
NEWS
February 1, 2015 | By Tirdad Derakhshani, Inquirer Staff Writer
It's time to say goodbye to Christopher Foyle. One of the most popular characters on British TV, the eponymous hero of the World War II mystery series Foyle's War will hang up his trilby for the last time Feb. 16, when the series' 28th and final episode will be posted by online TV provider Acorn TV. (It also is available on iTunes.) The finale will be the last of three new Foyle mysteries to be posted by Acorn weekly, beginning on Monday. Detective Chief Superintendent Foyle, created by the prolific novelist and screenwriter Anthony Horowitz and played to laconic perfection by Michael Kitchen, began his career as a senior police detective stationed during the war on the southern coast of England.
NEWS
January 15, 2015
TENS OF THOUSANDS of disabled GIs have returned home from war zones in Iraq and Afghanistan to face daunting challenges ranging from post-traumatic stress disorder to lost limbs and other injuries. Getting help starting or growing a business should not be one of their challenges. Now, thanks to an anonymous donor, St. Joseph's University is lending a helping hand. In March, the university's Office of Veterans Services will launch the Veterans Entrepreneurial Jumpstart Program.
NEWS
December 30, 2014 | By Laura McCrystal, Inquirer Staff Writer
Ted Paluch never considered himself much of a soldier. But the 92-year-old veteran's lips began to quiver when asked what he learned from World War II. "It made me a little more tolerant," he said. Paluch fell silent, adjusted his glasses, and pulled a tissue from the pocket of his blazer. "That's about it," he whispered. Sitting in a Philadelphia office on Sunday morning, Paluch recalled his experience surviving the Malmedy massacre of 1944, when German troops lined up and killed 84 U.S. soldiers captured during the Battle of the Bulge.
NEWS
December 27, 2014 | Inquirer Editorial Board
The class warfare that some conservatives have accused liberals of waging is already in full bloom - and the middle class is on the losing side. Despite a recent surge in economic growth, stagnant wages since the recession have middle-class families making more purchases on credit to keep up the appearance of doing well. In reality, many are just an emergency expense away from being unable to pay their bills. Meanwhile, the wealthiest Americans continue to rake in cash even when they're not acting as "job creators.
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