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NEWS
April 10, 2008
SO OBAMA didn't make the obligatory stop at Pat's or Geno's. I applaud him on skipping the two tourist traps that are the McDonald's and Burger King of cheesesteaks in the city. There are other joints to get a great cheesesteak, including Jim's, D'Allessandro's and John's Roast Pork. Bryan Flannery, Chalfont
NEWS
March 15, 2007
WHAT IS HAPPENING to our city? A soldier had to come home from the war to bury his mother. He's been in the Army for 16 years and the last two, he's been defending our country and protecting us against the terrorists. Unfortunately, while he was over in Iraq, no one was looking out for his mother. She was a woman who worked hard trying to make a living for her family, a mother who raised five children, 17 grandchildren, 10 great-grandchildren - and all she wanted was a ride home.
NEWS
December 4, 1990
Bejamin Frankin offered his thoughts on the efficacy of war in a letter to one of his sisters written from Philadelphia in 1787. It was selected by Roy Goodman, research librarian of the American Philosophical Society. I agree with you perfectly in your disapprobation of war. Abstracted from the inhumanity of it, I think it is wrong in point of human prudence, for whatever advantage one nation would obtain from another, whether it be part of their territory, the liberty of commerce with them, free passage on their rivers, etc., etc., it would be much cheaper to purchase such advantage with ready money than to pay the expence of acquiring it by war. An army is a devouring monster . . . when you have raised it, you have not only the fair charges of pay, clothing, provision, arms and ammunition, with numberless other contingent and just charges to answer and satisfy, but you have all the additional knavish charges of the numerous tribe of contractors . . . (who take)
NEWS
April 21, 2003
COLUMNIST Michael Kinsley wonders what an honest opponent of the war should do now (OpEd, April 16). First, most of the organized antiwar groups aren't honest - they are the Socialist Workers Party and the free-Mumia crazies on the far left. Others, though, might admit that they were wrong, and question their weakness of character in always opposing their country. Finally, the Hollywood antiwar crowd like Tim Robbins and Mike Farrell might opt for the ancient Japanese rite of contrition called hara-kiri.
NEWS
June 2, 1995 | Associated Press, KRT Graphics, Defense Dept., United Nations; DAILY NEWS GRAPHIC
Any attempt to rescue the hostages by force would be "an absurd, catastrophic mistake. " - Bosnian Serb leader Radovan Karadzic On sending U.S. troops: "As long as the mission was strictly limited for a very narrow purpose and it was something that we could do for them that they couldn't do for themselves, upon proper consultation with Congress, I would be inclined to do that. " - President Clinton "The U.N. mission in Bosnia has failed. It must be withdrawn and the U.S. should not refuse to assist in its withdrawal.
NEWS
January 27, 1991 | By David Zucchino, Inquirer Washington Bureau
After the first 24 hours, there was the illusion that this war would be easy. But there was a nagging sensation that the antiseptic, technology- controlled script the White House and Pentagon had created was too clean. The euphoria is gone. Now, 11 days into the war, the White House is warning that the conflict may be long and bloody. What America has seen is not the war itself, but the illusion of war. It is war by briefing, not battle. Satellite TV can relay the life and death of a smart bomb, but the war below remains inscrutable.
NEWS
February 12, 2003
I am writing about the people who are protesting against the war. I think that our President knows what he is doing. . . . All of the protesting is just making his job harder. Anthony Conway There must be other options beside war. I feel President Bush is seeking revenge for, or to complete, what his father was unable to complete. This is the wrong reason for war. Ashley Taylor The writers are juniors at Mercy Vocational High School in Philadelphia.
NEWS
November 10, 2006
SIGNE WILKINSON'S Nov. 8 "Stop the War" editorial cartoon accurately depicts the election results as a clear referendum on the war in Iraq. Nevertheless, her analysis is dead wrong on two fronts. First, Republicans and Democrats alike evidently voted for a change in U.S. policy in Iraq. So the words "Stop the War" ought to be purple. Using blue, over a red map of the U.S., perpetuates a false dichotomy of the electorate with regard to Iraq. Second, the cartoon implies that those who voted Democrat want the war to end, regardless of the situation on the ground.
NEWS
January 31, 2003
HAS ANYONE considered researching how many presidents since FDR have had sons of eligible draft age? Almost every president has had some dealings with war. However, none, to my knowledge, has had sons who enlisted, fought or were eligible to fight in an existing war during their term. Most presidents, Kennedy excluded (John was only 3), had daughters. I believe presidents, congressmen and senators would exhibit a different mind-set if their sons were going off to war. Regina Powell, Lansdowne
NEWS
August 22, 1991 | Special to The Inquirer / CHERIE KEMPER-STARNER
Members of the Rolling Thunder Pa. group rode from Phoenixville to the Vietnam Veterans Memorial in Washington, D.C., Saturday. The group brought back etchings of the names of the eight Phoenixville men who were killed in the war. They will be part of the area's planned Vietnam memorial.
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NEWS
April 13, 2015 | By Michael Matza, Inquirer Staff Writer
There are Buddhist "offering trees" made of pastel paper and golden foil. There are photos of saffron-robed monks, a woman in a lime-green Lao tube skirt, and South Philadelphia's Maethu Dee ("Grandma Dee"), wearing a floral-print shirt and clutching her walking stick. The installation at Asian Arts Initiative, a community center on the edge of Philadelphia's Chinatown, abounds with bright colors. Visitors generally take a little longer to notice the orange dots randomly arrayed on the gallery's floor - and by then they have been figuratively blown to bits because each dot underfoot symbolizes a cluster bomb.
NEWS
April 9, 2015 | By Edward Colimore, Inquirer Staff Writer
Just days before the battle at Hoengsong, South Korea, Army Cpl. Robert Higgins wrote a few words to his mother, Edith, in Philadelphia. He was hoping for more news from home. "When I get mail, I only get one letter that is from you," he wrote in his last letter, on Feb. 9, 1951. "I would like to have someone else write me, too. "It's like you said a long time ago, when all others stop writing, you will still write," he wrote. "Thanks for everything. Bob. " A few days later, Chinese forces overwhelmed his unit and others, killing hundreds and taking more than 100 prisoners in what became known as the Hoengsong massacre.
NEWS
April 9, 2015 | By Mike Newall, Inquirer Columnist
In the late fall of 1863, Pvt. Franklin Hill of Northern Liberties was fighting his way through the Tennessee Valley with the Union Army. Tattered and tested at the age of 20, Franklin had already been through hell and back. He was wearing a dead man's pants. He was eating a pig he bought with a Confederate $20 bill he found in the same dead Rebel's pocket. And he was worried sick over his white star. The white star was the emblem of Franklin's famed regiment - the 29th Pennsylvania Volunteers.
NEWS
April 8, 2015 | BY JOHN F. MORRISON, Daily News Staff Writer morrisj@phillynews.com, 215-854-5573
TOM LEVINS once told a reporter that the battle for Hill 875 at Dak To in Vietnam in the autumn of 1967, was "probably the longest four days of my life. It was just horrible. " His outfit, the 173rd Airborne Brigade, lost a fifth of its total strength in the desperate fight by American airborne forces against regular North Vietnam troops and the Vietcong. "He went into the Army a happy-go-lucky guy," said his brother, Robert. "He was different when he came back. He had a lot of issues.
NEWS
April 7, 2015 | BY JOHN F. MORRISON, Daily News Staff Writer morrisj@phillynews.com, 215-854-5573
BOB HIGGINS is coming home. After 63 years, the remains of the young Fishtown soldier, who was captured in a bloody battle at the height of the Korean War in 1951, will be returned here for proper ceremony and burial. His remains will arrive at Philadelphia International Airport from Hawaii on Thursday. A military escort will accompany the coffin to St. Ephrem Catholic Church in Bensalem for the funeral on Saturday. The escort will then accompany the coffin to Washington Crossing National Cemetery in Newtown, Bucks County, for burial with full military honors.
NEWS
April 6, 2015 | By Chris Brennan, Inquirer Staff Writer
Paul D. Hanson was an Army sergeant in his early 20s during the first of two tours of duty in Vietnam when his late-night poker game was interrupted by an attack on the firebase he was guarding. Hanson, now 70 and living in Aston, said more than 1,000 enemy soldiers poured out of the jungle surrounding the firebase as mortar and rocket fire whizzed over the concertina wire. He radioed for help, expecting artillery fire. What he got was something powerfully different. The USS New Jersey, to the east in the South China Sea, trained its 16-inch guns toward the source of Hanson's troubles.
NEWS
April 6, 2015 | By Mike Newall, Inquirer Columnist
One afternoon in February, Troy Fields and about 10 other guys from Seventh Street took seats in the gymnasium of the Police Athletic League center on Snyder Avenue - for them and so many who grew up around here, a safe haven from the violence and the shootings that mar this South Philadelphia neighborhood. Lauren Baraldi, chief of the District Attorney's Office Gun Violence Task Force, and others from the antigang initiative Focused Deterrence were waiting for them. They had an offer, Baraldi said.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 4, 2015 | By Tirdad Derakhshani, Inquirer Staff Writer
Perhaps most famous for his comedies, including Mr. & Mrs. Smith , Here Comes Mr. Jordan , and Haunted Honeymoon , Hollywood star Robert Montgomery made his fair share of dramas, including John Ford's World War II actioner They Were Expendable . But did you know Montgomery also played an (uncredited) role as assistant director to Ford on the war pic? Montgomery went on to direct five films, including the 1947 Raymond Chandler adaptation Lady in the Lake , featuring Audrey Totter, Lloyd Nolan, and Tom Tully.
NEWS
April 3, 2015 | By Maddie Hanna, Inquirer Trenton Bureau
As Gov. Christie pushes to overhaul public worker benefits, some teachers are waging a counterattack - with Twitter hashtags. Earlier this week, teachers took to social media, demanding that the governor and state lawmakers #fundnjpension. "I made my pension payment today. Did you?" many of the tweets read. Teachers sent the messages on Monday, a payday, when pension contributions are automatically withdrawn from their paychecks. The online offensive was supported by the New Jersey Education Association, which retweeted more than 200 of the messages.
NEWS
April 1, 2015 | By Jeremy Roebuck, Inquirer Staff Writer
Prosecutors on Monday accused six Philadelphia narcotics officers on trial in a wide-ranging federal corruption case of "disrespecting their badge" by shaking down suspects, stealing hundreds of thousands of dollars, and lying about it on their police reports. But that mild disparagement paled next to the invective defense lawyers unleashed in their opening statements to refer to their clients' accusers. "Trashy," "disreputable," "greedy," "sociopathic," and even "odoriferous" were deployed to describe the government's 19 primary witnesses, many of them admitted drug dealers, who are expected to testify that they were targeted by the group.
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