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NEWS
April 10, 2008
SO OBAMA didn't make the obligatory stop at Pat's or Geno's. I applaud him on skipping the two tourist traps that are the McDonald's and Burger King of cheesesteaks in the city. There are other joints to get a great cheesesteak, including Jim's, D'Allessandro's and John's Roast Pork. Bryan Flannery, Chalfont
NEWS
March 15, 2007
WHAT IS HAPPENING to our city? A soldier had to come home from the war to bury his mother. He's been in the Army for 16 years and the last two, he's been defending our country and protecting us against the terrorists. Unfortunately, while he was over in Iraq, no one was looking out for his mother. She was a woman who worked hard trying to make a living for her family, a mother who raised five children, 17 grandchildren, 10 great-grandchildren - and all she wanted was a ride home.
NEWS
December 4, 1990
Bejamin Frankin offered his thoughts on the efficacy of war in a letter to one of his sisters written from Philadelphia in 1787. It was selected by Roy Goodman, research librarian of the American Philosophical Society. I agree with you perfectly in your disapprobation of war. Abstracted from the inhumanity of it, I think it is wrong in point of human prudence, for whatever advantage one nation would obtain from another, whether it be part of their territory, the liberty of commerce with them, free passage on their rivers, etc., etc., it would be much cheaper to purchase such advantage with ready money than to pay the expence of acquiring it by war. An army is a devouring monster . . . when you have raised it, you have not only the fair charges of pay, clothing, provision, arms and ammunition, with numberless other contingent and just charges to answer and satisfy, but you have all the additional knavish charges of the numerous tribe of contractors . . . (who take)
NEWS
April 21, 2003
COLUMNIST Michael Kinsley wonders what an honest opponent of the war should do now (OpEd, April 16). First, most of the organized antiwar groups aren't honest - they are the Socialist Workers Party and the free-Mumia crazies on the far left. Others, though, might admit that they were wrong, and question their weakness of character in always opposing their country. Finally, the Hollywood antiwar crowd like Tim Robbins and Mike Farrell might opt for the ancient Japanese rite of contrition called hara-kiri.
NEWS
June 2, 1995 | Associated Press, KRT Graphics, Defense Dept., United Nations; DAILY NEWS GRAPHIC
Any attempt to rescue the hostages by force would be "an absurd, catastrophic mistake. " - Bosnian Serb leader Radovan Karadzic On sending U.S. troops: "As long as the mission was strictly limited for a very narrow purpose and it was something that we could do for them that they couldn't do for themselves, upon proper consultation with Congress, I would be inclined to do that. " - President Clinton "The U.N. mission in Bosnia has failed. It must be withdrawn and the U.S. should not refuse to assist in its withdrawal.
NEWS
January 27, 1991 | By David Zucchino, Inquirer Washington Bureau
After the first 24 hours, there was the illusion that this war would be easy. But there was a nagging sensation that the antiseptic, technology- controlled script the White House and Pentagon had created was too clean. The euphoria is gone. Now, 11 days into the war, the White House is warning that the conflict may be long and bloody. What America has seen is not the war itself, but the illusion of war. It is war by briefing, not battle. Satellite TV can relay the life and death of a smart bomb, but the war below remains inscrutable.
NEWS
February 12, 2003
I am writing about the people who are protesting against the war. I think that our President knows what he is doing. . . . All of the protesting is just making his job harder. Anthony Conway There must be other options beside war. I feel President Bush is seeking revenge for, or to complete, what his father was unable to complete. This is the wrong reason for war. Ashley Taylor The writers are juniors at Mercy Vocational High School in Philadelphia.
NEWS
November 10, 2006
SIGNE WILKINSON'S Nov. 8 "Stop the War" editorial cartoon accurately depicts the election results as a clear referendum on the war in Iraq. Nevertheless, her analysis is dead wrong on two fronts. First, Republicans and Democrats alike evidently voted for a change in U.S. policy in Iraq. So the words "Stop the War" ought to be purple. Using blue, over a red map of the U.S., perpetuates a false dichotomy of the electorate with regard to Iraq. Second, the cartoon implies that those who voted Democrat want the war to end, regardless of the situation on the ground.
NEWS
January 31, 2003
HAS ANYONE considered researching how many presidents since FDR have had sons of eligible draft age? Almost every president has had some dealings with war. However, none, to my knowledge, has had sons who enlisted, fought or were eligible to fight in an existing war during their term. Most presidents, Kennedy excluded (John was only 3), had daughters. I believe presidents, congressmen and senators would exhibit a different mind-set if their sons were going off to war. Regina Powell, Lansdowne
NEWS
August 22, 1991 | Special to The Inquirer / CHERIE KEMPER-STARNER
Members of the Rolling Thunder Pa. group rode from Phoenixville to the Vietnam Veterans Memorial in Washington, D.C., Saturday. The group brought back etchings of the names of the eight Phoenixville men who were killed in the war. They will be part of the area's planned Vietnam memorial.
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BUSINESS
June 21, 2016 | By Joseph N. DiStefano, Staff Writer
Engineers and machinists have built war helicopters in Delaware County since vertical-lift pioneer Frank Piasecki opened his shop in Sharon Hill, after making a Navy prototype in World War II. Will successor Boeing Corp.'s helicopter plant in Ridley Township - the Philadelphia area's top remaining industrial employer - keep its place as a leading military contractor, as drones and robotic warfare start to replace human fighters? Nearly 5,000 Boeing employees will build 50 $30 million Chinook helicopters for the U.S. and foreign armies, and 21 fuselages for $70 million-plus Ospreys for the U.S. Marines this year.
NEWS
June 10, 2016 | By Don Sapatkin, Staff Writer
Tipping point, inspiration, harbinger. Those were the words that public health advocates are using to describe Philadelphia City Council's vote to advance the first big-city levy on soda. "The arc of history is bending toward public health," said Jim O'Hara, health promotion director for the Center for Science in the Public Interest, which has been pushing for years for taxes on sugar-sweetened beverages as a way to attack epidemics of obesity and diabetes. Philadelphia's 1.5-cent-per-ounce tax is half of Mayor Kenney's original proposal, but would include diet drinks - a compromise intended to raise more money even as artificial sweeteners' safety and benefits are still being scrutinized.
NEWS
June 10, 2016
By Elbridge Colby Recent events in Rome indicate that some influential figures in the Vatican want Pope Francis to use his next encyclical to jettison the "just war" theory as the way the church determines whether or not it is moral to go to war. In particular, they urge that the church replace this age-old model - which focuses on determining a fight's justifiability by the degree to which it complies with criteria like necessity, likelihood of...
TRAVEL
May 30, 2016
While strolling through the sylvan Cismigiu Gardens in the Romanian capital of Bucharest, we came across a striking sight: a stone memorial to Americans killed in World War II. Although there are war memorials all over Europe - many honoring fallen Americans - this one stood out because Romania and the United States were on opposite sides in that conflict. Known as the Monument of American Heroes, the granite marker memorializes 378 American servicemen who died in Romania during the war; many were killed while bombing the strategic oil fields at Ploiesti.
NEWS
May 30, 2016
Joseph M. Knippenberg is professor of politics at Oglethorpe University in Atlanta Earlier this month, when she announced that the Obama administration was filing a lawsuit against North Carolina over its "bathroom bill," Attorney General Loretta Lynch traversed a significant portion of the history of political philosophy within a few short paragraphs. I'm quite confident that she didn't mean to do so, but she raised a number of issues that offer us the opportunity to get beyond the controversies of the moment and examine some of the deeper reasons for our current predicament.
NEWS
May 29, 2016
FX is giving Reagan-era Russian spies Philip and Elizabeth Jennings (Matthew Rhys and Keri Russell) a final two seasons to win one for the U.S.S.R. in The Americans . The show currently runs at 10 p.m. Wednesdays.
NEWS
May 28, 2016 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Staff Writer
James J. Matour, 91, of East Falls, a World War II veteran and a retired executive with the Philadelphia Gas Works, died Monday, May 23, of heart failure at home. Mr. Matour grew up in Germantown. He graduated second in his class at Simon Gratz High School in 1942 and entered what is now Drexel University to major in mechanical engineering. In 1943, he interrupted his studies to enlist in the Army Air Corps. He was a B-17 bomber pilot, and flew 19 bombing missions over Nazi Germany in 1944 and 1945.
NEWS
May 16, 2016 | By Jake Blumgart
Long before Game of Thrones brought the wretchedness of medieval life and politics - plus dragons - to the small screen, Akira Kurosawa delivered an equally grim vision of endless war to the big screen. The Japanese director is best remembered in the United States for films such as the endlessly adapted Seven Samurai (another American version will be released this fall), but in 1985 he released his final film on the subject: Ran . It's a portrayal of violence, betrayal, scheming, and seemingly inevitable tragedy that makes the Red Wedding look like harmless fisticuffs.
NEWS
May 15, 2016
The Summer Before the War By Helen Simonson Random House. 473 pp. $28 Reviewed by Katherine Bailey Fans of Helen Simonson's 2010 debut novel, Major Pettigrew's Last Stand , and readers who enjoy fiction steeped in Downton Abbey ambience will delight in The Summer Before the War . Set in the small coastal town of Rye in Sussex during the Great War, the book offers vivid description of town and country...
NEWS
May 11, 2016
It typically takes less than three hours to travel the 140 miles between Philadelphia and Gettysburg. But it took years to reach the conclusion that artifacts in the Civil War Museum of Philadelphia's collection should be moved to the Gettysburg National Military Park Museum and Visitor Center. The collection hasn't had a permanent home since 2008, when a mansion at 18th and Pine Streets that served as the museum closed. The plan then was to build a more fitting facility to serve as a museum, but it never happened.
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