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NEWS
April 10, 2008
SO OBAMA didn't make the obligatory stop at Pat's or Geno's. I applaud him on skipping the two tourist traps that are the McDonald's and Burger King of cheesesteaks in the city. There are other joints to get a great cheesesteak, including Jim's, D'Allessandro's and John's Roast Pork. Bryan Flannery, Chalfont
NEWS
March 15, 2007
WHAT IS HAPPENING to our city? A soldier had to come home from the war to bury his mother. He's been in the Army for 16 years and the last two, he's been defending our country and protecting us against the terrorists. Unfortunately, while he was over in Iraq, no one was looking out for his mother. She was a woman who worked hard trying to make a living for her family, a mother who raised five children, 17 grandchildren, 10 great-grandchildren - and all she wanted was a ride home.
NEWS
December 4, 1990
Bejamin Frankin offered his thoughts on the efficacy of war in a letter to one of his sisters written from Philadelphia in 1787. It was selected by Roy Goodman, research librarian of the American Philosophical Society. I agree with you perfectly in your disapprobation of war. Abstracted from the inhumanity of it, I think it is wrong in point of human prudence, for whatever advantage one nation would obtain from another, whether it be part of their territory, the liberty of commerce with them, free passage on their rivers, etc., etc., it would be much cheaper to purchase such advantage with ready money than to pay the expence of acquiring it by war. An army is a devouring monster . . . when you have raised it, you have not only the fair charges of pay, clothing, provision, arms and ammunition, with numberless other contingent and just charges to answer and satisfy, but you have all the additional knavish charges of the numerous tribe of contractors . . . (who take)
NEWS
April 21, 2003
COLUMNIST Michael Kinsley wonders what an honest opponent of the war should do now (OpEd, April 16). First, most of the organized antiwar groups aren't honest - they are the Socialist Workers Party and the free-Mumia crazies on the far left. Others, though, might admit that they were wrong, and question their weakness of character in always opposing their country. Finally, the Hollywood antiwar crowd like Tim Robbins and Mike Farrell might opt for the ancient Japanese rite of contrition called hara-kiri.
NEWS
June 2, 1995 | Associated Press, KRT Graphics, Defense Dept., United Nations; DAILY NEWS GRAPHIC
Any attempt to rescue the hostages by force would be "an absurd, catastrophic mistake. " - Bosnian Serb leader Radovan Karadzic On sending U.S. troops: "As long as the mission was strictly limited for a very narrow purpose and it was something that we could do for them that they couldn't do for themselves, upon proper consultation with Congress, I would be inclined to do that. " - President Clinton "The U.N. mission in Bosnia has failed. It must be withdrawn and the U.S. should not refuse to assist in its withdrawal.
NEWS
January 27, 1991 | By David Zucchino, Inquirer Washington Bureau
After the first 24 hours, there was the illusion that this war would be easy. But there was a nagging sensation that the antiseptic, technology- controlled script the White House and Pentagon had created was too clean. The euphoria is gone. Now, 11 days into the war, the White House is warning that the conflict may be long and bloody. What America has seen is not the war itself, but the illusion of war. It is war by briefing, not battle. Satellite TV can relay the life and death of a smart bomb, but the war below remains inscrutable.
NEWS
February 12, 2003
I am writing about the people who are protesting against the war. I think that our President knows what he is doing. . . . All of the protesting is just making his job harder. Anthony Conway There must be other options beside war. I feel President Bush is seeking revenge for, or to complete, what his father was unable to complete. This is the wrong reason for war. Ashley Taylor The writers are juniors at Mercy Vocational High School in Philadelphia.
NEWS
November 10, 2006
SIGNE WILKINSON'S Nov. 8 "Stop the War" editorial cartoon accurately depicts the election results as a clear referendum on the war in Iraq. Nevertheless, her analysis is dead wrong on two fronts. First, Republicans and Democrats alike evidently voted for a change in U.S. policy in Iraq. So the words "Stop the War" ought to be purple. Using blue, over a red map of the U.S., perpetuates a false dichotomy of the electorate with regard to Iraq. Second, the cartoon implies that those who voted Democrat want the war to end, regardless of the situation on the ground.
NEWS
January 31, 2003
HAS ANYONE considered researching how many presidents since FDR have had sons of eligible draft age? Almost every president has had some dealings with war. However, none, to my knowledge, has had sons who enlisted, fought or were eligible to fight in an existing war during their term. Most presidents, Kennedy excluded (John was only 3), had daughters. I believe presidents, congressmen and senators would exhibit a different mind-set if their sons were going off to war. Regina Powell, Lansdowne
NEWS
August 22, 1991 | Special to The Inquirer / CHERIE KEMPER-STARNER
Members of the Rolling Thunder Pa. group rode from Phoenixville to the Vietnam Veterans Memorial in Washington, D.C., Saturday. The group brought back etchings of the names of the eight Phoenixville men who were killed in the war. They will be part of the area's planned Vietnam memorial.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
July 21, 2016 | By Hugh Hunter, For The Inquirer
A zesty revival of The Producers (2001), the Mel Brooks musical, is now running at the Broadway Theatre in Pitman, N.J. Once again we get to laugh at the desperate maneuvering of Max Bialystok and Leo Bloom, producers who intentionally create a show that is so bad they assume it will immediately fold. Then they plan to skip town with the production money Max has bilked from little old ladies. But the scam comes a cropper when their show, Springtime For Hitler , turns into a campy hit. It is wonderful satire, and in the 1967 movie version you never forget Max's shock when the audience rolls in laughter on opening night.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 21, 2016 | By Sally Friedman, For The Inquirer
The craziness usually begins a full week before arrival day. "Are you bringing the corn? 18 ears?" demands the daughter who prides herself on administrative ability. "You're not on the sign-up sheet. " The sign-up sheet? For a fleeting moment, I want to remind this daughter that I'm her mother, once the maternal equivalent of a CEO, and a reasonably competent woman who knows that I'll be bringing more corn than they're likely to see in Kansas for our first night's dinner on Long Beach Island.
NEWS
July 15, 2016 | By Zoë Miller, Staff Writer
The stolen memorial flag of Seaman Patrick Corcoran, a 19-year-old from Philadelphia who died aboard the USS Frank E. Evans during the Vietnam War, was returned Monday to the scene of the July Fourth crime - the front porch of a North Wildwood home. On Monday, an unidentified young woman returned the flag, which was taken from a flagpole of a home owned by Tom and Lorraine Schaffer on East 11th Avenue. The woman then got back inside a car that was waiting outside the Schaffers' home and left.
NEWS
July 10, 2016 | By Zoë Miller, Staff Writer
The American flag presented to the family of Seaman Patrick M. Corcoran at his funeral nearly 50 years ago is still missing. And the family wants it back, no questions asked. The priceless object was stolen on July 4th from a flagpole outside a home next door to the Corcoran family's Shore house in North Wildwood. Patrick Corcoran, a Torresdale native who served in the Vietnam War, died at sea at age 19 with 73 other sailors when the Navy destroyer USS Frank E. Evans collided in 1969 with Australia's HMAS Melbourne, an aircraft carrier.
NEWS
July 8, 2016 | By Melanie Burney, Staff Writer
For nearly a decade, the family of Seaman Patrick M. Corcoran has flown an American flag outside its Jersey Shore home on special occasions to honor the Philadelphia native lost at sea during the Vietnam War. It was the flag presented to the family nearly 50 years ago at his funeral. But early on the morning of July 4, someone snatched the huge flag from a flagpole on East 11th Avenue in North Wildwood only hours after it had been hoisted for the holiday. Now there is outrage among not only the Corcoran family and Shore officials but also in the emotions shared in a social-media campaign started by neighbors and the town to immediately return the cherished heirloom - one of the family's only physical connections to Corcoran, who died aboard the USS Frank E. Evans in 1969.
NEWS
July 7, 2016 | By Jan Hefler, Staff Writer
After the humvee struck an IED during a dangerous convoy in Iraq and flipped over, the airman driving it was knocked unconscious and bleeding profusely. His face was unrecognizable, his right arm crushed. He was rushed by a Black Hawk helicopter to a U.S. military hospital in Kuwait where Capt. Joseph P. Costabile, head of the surgery department, was waiting. Costabile recalled hearing someone say that the patient was "already dead" while he was being carried in. Costabile had a busy vascular surgery practice in Cherry Hill and was a reservist in the Navy when he was called to duty in 2005.
BUSINESS
June 21, 2016 | By Joseph N. DiStefano, Staff Writer
Engineers and machinists have built war helicopters in Delaware County since vertical-lift pioneer Frank Piasecki opened his shop in Sharon Hill, after making a Navy prototype in World War II. Will successor Boeing Corp.'s helicopter plant in Ridley Township - the Philadelphia area's top remaining industrial employer - keep its place as a leading military contractor, as drones and robotic warfare start to replace human fighters? Nearly 5,000 Boeing employees will build 50 $30 million Chinook helicopters for the U.S. and foreign armies, and 21 fuselages for $70 million-plus Ospreys for the U.S. Marines this year.
NEWS
June 10, 2016 | By Don Sapatkin, Staff Writer
Tipping point, inspiration, harbinger. Those were the words that public health advocates are using to describe Philadelphia City Council's vote to advance the first big-city levy on soda. "The arc of history is bending toward public health," said Jim O'Hara, health promotion director for the Center for Science in the Public Interest, which has been pushing for years for taxes on sugar-sweetened beverages as a way to attack epidemics of obesity and diabetes. Philadelphia's 1.5-cent-per-ounce tax is half of Mayor Kenney's original proposal, but would include diet drinks - a compromise intended to raise more money even as artificial sweeteners' safety and benefits are still being scrutinized.
NEWS
June 10, 2016
By Elbridge Colby Recent events in Rome indicate that some influential figures in the Vatican want Pope Francis to use his next encyclical to jettison the "just war" theory as the way the church determines whether or not it is moral to go to war. In particular, they urge that the church replace this age-old model - which focuses on determining a fight's justifiability by the degree to which it complies with criteria like necessity, likelihood of...
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