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NEWS
April 10, 2008
SO OBAMA didn't make the obligatory stop at Pat's or Geno's. I applaud him on skipping the two tourist traps that are the McDonald's and Burger King of cheesesteaks in the city. There are other joints to get a great cheesesteak, including Jim's, D'Allessandro's and John's Roast Pork. Bryan Flannery, Chalfont
NEWS
March 15, 2007
WHAT IS HAPPENING to our city? A soldier had to come home from the war to bury his mother. He's been in the Army for 16 years and the last two, he's been defending our country and protecting us against the terrorists. Unfortunately, while he was over in Iraq, no one was looking out for his mother. She was a woman who worked hard trying to make a living for her family, a mother who raised five children, 17 grandchildren, 10 great-grandchildren - and all she wanted was a ride home.
NEWS
December 4, 1990
Bejamin Frankin offered his thoughts on the efficacy of war in a letter to one of his sisters written from Philadelphia in 1787. It was selected by Roy Goodman, research librarian of the American Philosophical Society. I agree with you perfectly in your disapprobation of war. Abstracted from the inhumanity of it, I think it is wrong in point of human prudence, for whatever advantage one nation would obtain from another, whether it be part of their territory, the liberty of commerce with them, free passage on their rivers, etc., etc., it would be much cheaper to purchase such advantage with ready money than to pay the expence of acquiring it by war. An army is a devouring monster . . . when you have raised it, you have not only the fair charges of pay, clothing, provision, arms and ammunition, with numberless other contingent and just charges to answer and satisfy, but you have all the additional knavish charges of the numerous tribe of contractors . . . (who take)
NEWS
April 21, 2003
COLUMNIST Michael Kinsley wonders what an honest opponent of the war should do now (OpEd, April 16). First, most of the organized antiwar groups aren't honest - they are the Socialist Workers Party and the free-Mumia crazies on the far left. Others, though, might admit that they were wrong, and question their weakness of character in always opposing their country. Finally, the Hollywood antiwar crowd like Tim Robbins and Mike Farrell might opt for the ancient Japanese rite of contrition called hara-kiri.
NEWS
June 2, 1995 | Associated Press, KRT Graphics, Defense Dept., United Nations; DAILY NEWS GRAPHIC
Any attempt to rescue the hostages by force would be "an absurd, catastrophic mistake. " - Bosnian Serb leader Radovan Karadzic On sending U.S. troops: "As long as the mission was strictly limited for a very narrow purpose and it was something that we could do for them that they couldn't do for themselves, upon proper consultation with Congress, I would be inclined to do that. " - President Clinton "The U.N. mission in Bosnia has failed. It must be withdrawn and the U.S. should not refuse to assist in its withdrawal.
NEWS
January 27, 1991 | By David Zucchino, Inquirer Washington Bureau
After the first 24 hours, there was the illusion that this war would be easy. But there was a nagging sensation that the antiseptic, technology- controlled script the White House and Pentagon had created was too clean. The euphoria is gone. Now, 11 days into the war, the White House is warning that the conflict may be long and bloody. What America has seen is not the war itself, but the illusion of war. It is war by briefing, not battle. Satellite TV can relay the life and death of a smart bomb, but the war below remains inscrutable.
NEWS
February 12, 2003
I am writing about the people who are protesting against the war. I think that our President knows what he is doing. . . . All of the protesting is just making his job harder. Anthony Conway There must be other options beside war. I feel President Bush is seeking revenge for, or to complete, what his father was unable to complete. This is the wrong reason for war. Ashley Taylor The writers are juniors at Mercy Vocational High School in Philadelphia.
NEWS
November 10, 2006
SIGNE WILKINSON'S Nov. 8 "Stop the War" editorial cartoon accurately depicts the election results as a clear referendum on the war in Iraq. Nevertheless, her analysis is dead wrong on two fronts. First, Republicans and Democrats alike evidently voted for a change in U.S. policy in Iraq. So the words "Stop the War" ought to be purple. Using blue, over a red map of the U.S., perpetuates a false dichotomy of the electorate with regard to Iraq. Second, the cartoon implies that those who voted Democrat want the war to end, regardless of the situation on the ground.
NEWS
May 12, 2015 | Inquirer Editorial Board
The War on Terror hasn't lasted that long - not compared with the Hundred Years' War (1337- 1453) or even the Thirty Years' War (1618-48). But most Americans are war-weary nonetheless, and there is no sign of relief. How can there be when any violent act by a lone wolf can be claimed by a terrorist organization as its latest attack on America? U.S. officials were trying to determine whether ISIS, which claimed responsibility for a shootout last week at a free-speech event in Texas, was actually involved.
NEWS
January 31, 2003
HAS ANYONE considered researching how many presidents since FDR have had sons of eligible draft age? Almost every president has had some dealings with war. However, none, to my knowledge, has had sons who enlisted, fought or were eligible to fight in an existing war during their term. Most presidents, Kennedy excluded (John was only 3), had daughters. I believe presidents, congressmen and senators would exhibit a different mind-set if their sons were going off to war. Regina Powell, Lansdowne
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NEWS
May 22, 2015 | By Aubrey Whelan, Inquirer Staff Writer
A former 911 dispatcher has been charged with scamming the city out of $55,500 from a fund earmarked for members of the armed services fighting in the war on terror. Authorities say Pendarvis Williams, 51, forged paperwork to collect $500 a month allotted to employees serving in Operation Enduring Freedom, the military response to the Sept. 11 attacks, officials said Wednesday. He was charged this week with theft. Williams, a former National Guardsman, was eligible for the program for about a year: He served on active duty in the armed forces from Dec. 3, 2002, to Oct. 18, 2003, as part of Operation Enduring Freedom.
NEWS
May 15, 2015 | By Thomas Fitzgerald, Inquirer Politics Writer
Suddenly, Republicans aiming for the White House find themselves knee-deep in the big muddy. Twelve years after the United States invaded Iraq, the party's presidential hopefuls are rehashing the decision to go to war, after former Florida Gov. Jeb Bush said in an interview that aired Monday that he would have made the same decision as his brother, former President George W. Bush. Jeb Bush has since tried to clarify his comments, but he has been dragged into a three-day political quagmire as, one after the other, his likely rivals have said they would not have ordered the 2003 invasion of Iraq, given the erroneous intelligence that Saddam Hussein's regime had weapons of mass destruction.
NEWS
May 14, 2015 | By Andrew Seidman, Inquirer Staff Writer
Gov. Christie said Tuesday that if he'd been president in 2003 and had known that Iraq did not have weapons of mass destruction, he would not have gone to war. "Now, I think President Bush made the best decision he could at the time," given the information the intelligence community had provided to him, Christie told CNN's Jake Tapper in an interview. "But I don't think you can honestly say that if we knew then that there was no WMD, that the country should've gone to war," Christie said.
NEWS
May 12, 2015 | Inquirer Editorial Board
The War on Terror hasn't lasted that long - not compared with the Hundred Years' War (1337- 1453) or even the Thirty Years' War (1618-48). But most Americans are war-weary nonetheless, and there is no sign of relief. How can there be when any violent act by a lone wolf can be claimed by a terrorist organization as its latest attack on America? U.S. officials were trying to determine whether ISIS, which claimed responsibility for a shootout last week at a free-speech event in Texas, was actually involved.
NEWS
May 5, 2015 | By Michaelle Bond, Inquirer Staff Writer
Bruce Knapp remembers learning about the Revolutionary War Battle of Paoli in his seventh-grade classroom in the San Francisco area. Years after he moved to Chester County as an adult, he joined a group that had successfully raised money to save the Paoli Battlefield, a pristine piece of Main Line property, from developers in the 1990s. Now, the retired federal investigator is leading the charge to get the National Park Service to recognize the site for what the community believes it is: a national historic landmark.
NEWS
May 4, 2015 | By Trudy Rubin, Inquirer Columnist
ZAATARI CAMP, Jordan - When 13-year-old Majid fled with his family from southern Syria in 2013 to escape shelling by government forces, he left everything behind, including his dreams. Looking older than his 15 years, his face perspiring under dark stubble, a dirty green sweatshirt hanging loosely on his rangy frame, Majid spoke to me in his new home, a small, bare trailer in the Zaatari refugee camp near Mafraq, Jordan - now the second-largest refugee camp anywhere. Sitting on one of several floor mats, the only furniture in the trailer, he had just returned from a workday spent chopping stones to make gravel that could be used in concrete.
NEWS
May 2, 2015 | By Maria Panaritis, Inquirer Staff Writer
Charlie Crescenz has many reasons to think of his little brother Michael. A statue is being made in his honor, a VFW hall bears his name, and on Saturday, Philadelphia's VA hospital will be renamed for the boy who died at 19 in a blaze of machine-gun fire while protecting his platoon in the mountains of Vietnam. None of that, however - not even the Medal of Honor that President Richard M. Nixon gave Michael's family - is what rekindles 47-year-old memories of the brother born a year and a half after Charlie.
NEWS
May 1, 2015 | Jerome Maida, For the Daily News
With "Avengers: Age of Ultron" projected to do at least $200 million domestically - after opening to over $200 million overseas last weekend - it is clear that Marvel Studios remains hotter than ever, years after some movie pundits declared the comic-book movie craze over. "We are under incredibly crushing expectations," Marvel Studios president Kevin Feige said in an exclusive interview. Indeed, it says something that if "Avengers: Age of Ultron" does "only" $500 million domestically and $1.3 billion worldwide, it would be considered something of a disappointment.
NEWS
April 30, 2015 | By Paul Nussbaum, Inquirer Staff Writer
Rabbi Linda Holtzman, who has made a career of liberal activism, ventured into new territory when she scampered across Broad Street in North Philadelphia to slap a black-and-yellow sticker on the back of Adolf Hitler's head. Hitler is featured in an anti-Islam ad displayed on SEPTA buses this month, and Holtzman and other Jewish activists have launched a campaign of guerrilla protest. They are pasting stickers that are a parody of SEPTA's own "Dude, It's Rude" pro-civility ad campaign onto the anti-Islam ads: "Dude It's Rude . . . Hate Speech - Really?"
NEWS
April 29, 2015 | BY DOYLE McMANUS
ALMOST two years ago, President Obama announced that he was tightening the rules under which the CIA carries out drone strikes against suspected terrorists in Pakistan, Yemen and other countries. Afterward, civilian casualties did, in fact, fall significantly, according to independent monitoring groups. But Obama's higher standard wasn't enough to avoid the unintended killing of two civilian hostages, one American and one Italian, in a Jan. 15 drone strike in Pakistan. Nor did the new rules protect two other U.S. citizens who had joined al Qaeda from being killed the same week.
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