IN THE NEWS

War

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
March 30, 2015 | By Michael Vitez, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
When she found out early in her pregnancy that one of her identical twins would die at birth, Sarah Gray began a five-year journey that culminated last week in Philadelphia. She had to carry the sick baby to term in order to protect his healthy twin. And she also looked into organ and tissue donation. "Instead of thinking of our son as a victim," she said, "I started thinking of him as a contributor to research, to science. " On March 23, 2010, Thomas and Callum Gray were born at Fairfax Hospital in Virginia.
NEWS
April 10, 2008
SO OBAMA didn't make the obligatory stop at Pat's or Geno's. I applaud him on skipping the two tourist traps that are the McDonald's and Burger King of cheesesteaks in the city. There are other joints to get a great cheesesteak, including Jim's, D'Allessandro's and John's Roast Pork. Bryan Flannery, Chalfont
NEWS
March 15, 2007
WHAT IS HAPPENING to our city? A soldier had to come home from the war to bury his mother. He's been in the Army for 16 years and the last two, he's been defending our country and protecting us against the terrorists. Unfortunately, while he was over in Iraq, no one was looking out for his mother. She was a woman who worked hard trying to make a living for her family, a mother who raised five children, 17 grandchildren, 10 great-grandchildren - and all she wanted was a ride home.
NEWS
December 4, 1990
Bejamin Frankin offered his thoughts on the efficacy of war in a letter to one of his sisters written from Philadelphia in 1787. It was selected by Roy Goodman, research librarian of the American Philosophical Society. I agree with you perfectly in your disapprobation of war. Abstracted from the inhumanity of it, I think it is wrong in point of human prudence, for whatever advantage one nation would obtain from another, whether it be part of their territory, the liberty of commerce with them, free passage on their rivers, etc., etc., it would be much cheaper to purchase such advantage with ready money than to pay the expence of acquiring it by war. An army is a devouring monster . . . when you have raised it, you have not only the fair charges of pay, clothing, provision, arms and ammunition, with numberless other contingent and just charges to answer and satisfy, but you have all the additional knavish charges of the numerous tribe of contractors . . . (who take)
NEWS
April 21, 2003
COLUMNIST Michael Kinsley wonders what an honest opponent of the war should do now (OpEd, April 16). First, most of the organized antiwar groups aren't honest - they are the Socialist Workers Party and the free-Mumia crazies on the far left. Others, though, might admit that they were wrong, and question their weakness of character in always opposing their country. Finally, the Hollywood antiwar crowd like Tim Robbins and Mike Farrell might opt for the ancient Japanese rite of contrition called hara-kiri.
NEWS
June 2, 1995 | Associated Press, KRT Graphics, Defense Dept., United Nations; DAILY NEWS GRAPHIC
Any attempt to rescue the hostages by force would be "an absurd, catastrophic mistake. " - Bosnian Serb leader Radovan Karadzic On sending U.S. troops: "As long as the mission was strictly limited for a very narrow purpose and it was something that we could do for them that they couldn't do for themselves, upon proper consultation with Congress, I would be inclined to do that. " - President Clinton "The U.N. mission in Bosnia has failed. It must be withdrawn and the U.S. should not refuse to assist in its withdrawal.
NEWS
January 27, 1991 | By David Zucchino, Inquirer Washington Bureau
After the first 24 hours, there was the illusion that this war would be easy. But there was a nagging sensation that the antiseptic, technology- controlled script the White House and Pentagon had created was too clean. The euphoria is gone. Now, 11 days into the war, the White House is warning that the conflict may be long and bloody. What America has seen is not the war itself, but the illusion of war. It is war by briefing, not battle. Satellite TV can relay the life and death of a smart bomb, but the war below remains inscrutable.
NEWS
February 12, 2003
I am writing about the people who are protesting against the war. I think that our President knows what he is doing. . . . All of the protesting is just making his job harder. Anthony Conway There must be other options beside war. I feel President Bush is seeking revenge for, or to complete, what his father was unable to complete. This is the wrong reason for war. Ashley Taylor The writers are juniors at Mercy Vocational High School in Philadelphia.
NEWS
November 10, 2006
SIGNE WILKINSON'S Nov. 8 "Stop the War" editorial cartoon accurately depicts the election results as a clear referendum on the war in Iraq. Nevertheless, her analysis is dead wrong on two fronts. First, Republicans and Democrats alike evidently voted for a change in U.S. policy in Iraq. So the words "Stop the War" ought to be purple. Using blue, over a red map of the U.S., perpetuates a false dichotomy of the electorate with regard to Iraq. Second, the cartoon implies that those who voted Democrat want the war to end, regardless of the situation on the ground.
NEWS
January 31, 2003
HAS ANYONE considered researching how many presidents since FDR have had sons of eligible draft age? Almost every president has had some dealings with war. However, none, to my knowledge, has had sons who enlisted, fought or were eligible to fight in an existing war during their term. Most presidents, Kennedy excluded (John was only 3), had daughters. I believe presidents, congressmen and senators would exhibit a different mind-set if their sons were going off to war. Regina Powell, Lansdowne
1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
ARTICLES BY DATE
ENTERTAINMENT
August 22, 2015 | By Michael Harrington, Inquirer Staff Writer
We felt a great a disturbance in the Force recently - as if thousands of geek voices cried out in anguish and refused to be silent. Yes, the news that in order to attend a Star Wars event at the Please Touch Museum, you have to be accompanied by someone of a certain age and not much taller than R2-D2 - i.e., a child - hit the solo adult fans hard and caused a Death Star-size social-media backlash. To those without a small fry to accompany them, we say, Jedi-like: This is not the Star Wars event you're looking for. You don't need to attend - you have any number of Comic Cons and Wizard Worlds of your own. Move along.
NEWS
August 21, 2015 | By Kevin Riordan, Inquirer Columnist
A retired plumber in Magnolia who is a Civil War buff, his musician/optician brother from Barrington, and a Voorhees video editor have teamed up to make a documentary. And it's a powerful piece of work. The South Jersey premiere of Civil War Prisons - An American Tragedy is set for Civic Hall on the Blackwood campus of Camden County College at 6:30 p.m. Oct. 26. Featuring professional voice actor Scott R. Pollak's polished narration, 300 evocative historical images, and a wistful soundtrack, the 77-minute movie is elegiac and unequivocal.
BUSINESS
August 18, 2015 | By Chris Mondics, Inquirer Staff Writer
By day, Kermit Roosevelt toils as a constitutional law professor at the University of Pennsylvania, where he is known as an expert on law governing the U.S. military prison in Guantanamo, the Voting Rights Act, and the legal debate over President Obama's health-care plan. But after hours, he has an entirely different line of work. Roosevelt, the great-great-grandson of President Theodore Roosevelt, is carving out a parallel career as a novelist. His first novel, In the Shadow of the Law , a tale of intrigue centered on young Washington lawyers, was published in 2005 by Farrar, Straus & Giroux.
NEWS
August 15, 2015 | By Edward Colimore, Inquirer Staff Writer
World War II fighter pilot Ray Garcia heard the stunning news aboard the Sea Owl while the troop ship waited with scores of others to pass through the Panama Canal on the way to combat in the Pacific. A member of the 57th Fighter Group, he had just left a grueling fight against the Germans in Europe and was preparing to take on the Japanese when he and his comrades learned of fearsome new bombs dropped on Hiroshima and Nagasaki. Then - as the Sea Owl changed course for the United States - more momentous tidings came by way of a small ship newspaper and the shipwide address system.
NEWS
August 14, 2015 | By Andrew Seidman, Inquirer Trenton Bureau
Gov. Christie on Wednesday criticized presidential rival Jeb Bush as "re-litigating" the Iraq War, arguing that the unpopular conflict is "not a winning fight" for the Republican Party as it seeks to win the White House in 2016. Christie's remarks to the conservative radio host Laura Ingraham came a day after Bush, a former Florida governor, accused President Obama and Hillary Rodham Clinton of hastening a "premature withdrawal" from Iraq and allowing the Islamic State to fill a void.
NEWS
August 11, 2015 | BY JOHN F. MORRISON, Daily News Staff Writer morrisj@phillynews.com, 215-854-5573
IT WAS OK to be afraid; it was not OK to panic. Fear was natural for the men who flew the bombers over Germany in World War II. It rode with them in their planes like a living entity. But if you panicked, you couldn't do your job. That was the way Joe Blinebury described what it was like in those B-17 Flying Fortresses that carried the war to the enemy with dangerous daylight bombing. Oddly, Joe, who flew 35 missions over Germany, said he calmed down when he slipped into the ball turret, his position under the belly of the plane.
NEWS
August 6, 2015 | BY BARBARA LAKER, Daily News Staff Writer lakerb@phillynews.com, 215-854-5933
THE FRAGILE LINE between life and death in Afghanistan for U.S. Army Sgt. Mark Wildsmith and his team was paper-thin. Assault-rifle battles with Taliban militants. Hand-propelled grenades tossed from behind. Suicide bombers in explosive-laden trucks. Every hour was as chancy as a game of Russian roulette. But at the end of every long, anxiety-fueled day, they returned to the base in Waghez to find their gentle, golden-colored stray dog, Kimo, bounding toward them, tail wagging.
NEWS
August 2, 2015 | By Ben Finley, Inquirer Staff Writer
Tucked away in a leafy corner of Bucks County, the Moland House commemorates 13 stressful days that George Washington and his Continental Army spent there during the Revolutionary War. It also recalls another bygone era: when Washington and Harrisburg had more money to fund historical preservation. The government programs that two decades ago helped salvage the 18th-century farmhouse - it had become a teenage hangout, replete with spray-painted pentagrams - have been gutted since the economic downturn.
SPORTS
July 22, 2015
SAINT JOSEPH'S annual Holy War with Villanova moves back to Hawk Hill this season, and that Dec. 1 matchup highlights SJU's nonconference schedule, which was released yesterday. The Hawks will open by hosting Drexel on Friday, Nov. 13, play two of their four Hall of Fame Tip-Off games at home, and see visits from Princeton, Illinois State and Maryland-Eastern Shore before the new year. All that is in additon to their matchup with Penn in half of the Big 5 Palestra doubleleader (with Temple-La Salle)
NEWS
July 21, 2015
LET'S TAKE a peek inside Katie McGinty's tug of war. We know there is one. Otherwise she'd simply say, "I am not a candidate for U.S. Senate. " That would end speculation that started in May, after Montco Commissioner Josh Shapiro said he won't run against Republican Pat Toomey next year. So, just the fact that McGinty's not talking shows, as one source close to her put it, she's "seriously, seriously considering. " She needs to make a decision soon because as Gov. Wolf's chief of staff she's a distraction to the many distractions keeping the governor and GOP lawmakers from agreeing on a now three-week-late budget.
1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
|
|
|
|
|