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NEWS
April 10, 2008
SO OBAMA didn't make the obligatory stop at Pat's or Geno's. I applaud him on skipping the two tourist traps that are the McDonald's and Burger King of cheesesteaks in the city. There are other joints to get a great cheesesteak, including Jim's, D'Allessandro's and John's Roast Pork. Bryan Flannery, Chalfont
NEWS
March 15, 2007
WHAT IS HAPPENING to our city? A soldier had to come home from the war to bury his mother. He's been in the Army for 16 years and the last two, he's been defending our country and protecting us against the terrorists. Unfortunately, while he was over in Iraq, no one was looking out for his mother. She was a woman who worked hard trying to make a living for her family, a mother who raised five children, 17 grandchildren, 10 great-grandchildren - and all she wanted was a ride home.
NEWS
December 4, 1990
Bejamin Frankin offered his thoughts on the efficacy of war in a letter to one of his sisters written from Philadelphia in 1787. It was selected by Roy Goodman, research librarian of the American Philosophical Society. I agree with you perfectly in your disapprobation of war. Abstracted from the inhumanity of it, I think it is wrong in point of human prudence, for whatever advantage one nation would obtain from another, whether it be part of their territory, the liberty of commerce with them, free passage on their rivers, etc., etc., it would be much cheaper to purchase such advantage with ready money than to pay the expence of acquiring it by war. An army is a devouring monster . . . when you have raised it, you have not only the fair charges of pay, clothing, provision, arms and ammunition, with numberless other contingent and just charges to answer and satisfy, but you have all the additional knavish charges of the numerous tribe of contractors . . . (who take)
NEWS
April 21, 2003
COLUMNIST Michael Kinsley wonders what an honest opponent of the war should do now (OpEd, April 16). First, most of the organized antiwar groups aren't honest - they are the Socialist Workers Party and the free-Mumia crazies on the far left. Others, though, might admit that they were wrong, and question their weakness of character in always opposing their country. Finally, the Hollywood antiwar crowd like Tim Robbins and Mike Farrell might opt for the ancient Japanese rite of contrition called hara-kiri.
NEWS
June 2, 1995 | Associated Press, KRT Graphics, Defense Dept., United Nations; DAILY NEWS GRAPHIC
Any attempt to rescue the hostages by force would be "an absurd, catastrophic mistake. " - Bosnian Serb leader Radovan Karadzic On sending U.S. troops: "As long as the mission was strictly limited for a very narrow purpose and it was something that we could do for them that they couldn't do for themselves, upon proper consultation with Congress, I would be inclined to do that. " - President Clinton "The U.N. mission in Bosnia has failed. It must be withdrawn and the U.S. should not refuse to assist in its withdrawal.
NEWS
January 27, 1991 | By David Zucchino, Inquirer Washington Bureau
After the first 24 hours, there was the illusion that this war would be easy. But there was a nagging sensation that the antiseptic, technology- controlled script the White House and Pentagon had created was too clean. The euphoria is gone. Now, 11 days into the war, the White House is warning that the conflict may be long and bloody. What America has seen is not the war itself, but the illusion of war. It is war by briefing, not battle. Satellite TV can relay the life and death of a smart bomb, but the war below remains inscrutable.
NEWS
February 12, 2003
I am writing about the people who are protesting against the war. I think that our President knows what he is doing. . . . All of the protesting is just making his job harder. Anthony Conway There must be other options beside war. I feel President Bush is seeking revenge for, or to complete, what his father was unable to complete. This is the wrong reason for war. Ashley Taylor The writers are juniors at Mercy Vocational High School in Philadelphia.
NEWS
February 11, 2013
David Sutherland is a retired U.S. Army colonel and director of the Center for Military and Veterans Community Services (Dixon Center) Paula J. Caplan is a Harvard University psychologist and author of "When Johnny and Jane Come Marching Home: How All of Us Can Help Veterans" There's no mystery, but people talk as though there is. Some leaders in the Department of Veterans Affairs, as well as some psychotherapists and other citizens, express...
NEWS
November 10, 2006
SIGNE WILKINSON'S Nov. 8 "Stop the War" editorial cartoon accurately depicts the election results as a clear referendum on the war in Iraq. Nevertheless, her analysis is dead wrong on two fronts. First, Republicans and Democrats alike evidently voted for a change in U.S. policy in Iraq. So the words "Stop the War" ought to be purple. Using blue, over a red map of the U.S., perpetuates a false dichotomy of the electorate with regard to Iraq. Second, the cartoon implies that those who voted Democrat want the war to end, regardless of the situation on the ground.
NEWS
January 31, 2003
HAS ANYONE considered researching how many presidents since FDR have had sons of eligible draft age? Almost every president has had some dealings with war. However, none, to my knowledge, has had sons who enlisted, fought or were eligible to fight in an existing war during their term. Most presidents, Kennedy excluded (John was only 3), had daughters. I believe presidents, congressmen and senators would exhibit a different mind-set if their sons were going off to war. Regina Powell, Lansdowne
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NEWS
January 15, 2015
TENS OF THOUSANDS of disabled GIs have returned home from war zones in Iraq and Afghanistan to face daunting challenges ranging from post-traumatic stress disorder to lost limbs and other injuries. Getting help starting or growing a business should not be one of their challenges. Now, thanks to an anonymous donor, St. Joseph's University is lending a helping hand. In March, the university's Office of Veterans Services will launch the Veterans Entrepreneurial Jumpstart Program.
NEWS
December 30, 2014 | By Laura McCrystal, Inquirer Staff Writer
Ted Paluch never considered himself much of a soldier. But the 92-year-old veteran's lips began to quiver when asked what he learned from World War II. "It made me a little more tolerant," he said. Paluch fell silent, adjusted his glasses, and pulled a tissue from the pocket of his blazer. "That's about it," he whispered. Sitting in a Philadelphia office on Sunday morning, Paluch recalled his experience surviving the Malmedy massacre of 1944, when German troops lined up and killed 84 U.S. soldiers captured during the Battle of the Bulge.
NEWS
December 27, 2014 | Inquirer Editorial Board
The class warfare that some conservatives have accused liberals of waging is already in full bloom - and the middle class is on the losing side. Despite a recent surge in economic growth, stagnant wages since the recession have middle-class families making more purchases on credit to keep up the appearance of doing well. In reality, many are just an emergency expense away from being unable to pay their bills. Meanwhile, the wealthiest Americans continue to rake in cash even when they're not acting as "job creators.
NEWS
December 18, 2014 | By Robert Moran, Inquirer Staff Writer
Ray White, a 90-year-old World War II veteran, was left homeless after befriending a con man who systematically scammed him out of his South Philadelphia house, vintage Bentley and Cadillac, and everything else he valued. On Tuesday, 61-year-old Melvin McIlwaine pleaded guilty to cheating White of his worldly possessions, clearing the way for the retiree who served in the Battle of the Bulge to put his life back together. The guilty plea came at "the eleventh hour," just as jury selection was about to begin for McIlwaine's criminal fraud trial, said Assistant District Attorney Deborah Cooper Nixon.
NEWS
December 14, 2014 | By Edward Colimore, Inquirer Staff Writer
In a bedroom lay a white silk pillow - yellowed with age and emblazoned with the screaming eagle emblem of the Army's 101st Airborne Division. On the walls were pictures and plaques telling the story of a World War II veteran; in another room was an adjustable hospital bed and, on a windowsill, a worn Bible. That October day, Jim Bennett was looking for an investment, a house to buy, rehab, then rent or resell, as he has done with about 500 others over more than 20 years. But Bennett found much more at the modest, two-story rowhouse on Winton Street in South Philadelphia.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 13, 2014 | By Tirdad Derakhshani, Inquirer Staff Writer
It seems impossible that a film as small and intimate as the two-character drama Diplomacy could say so much about the Nazi ethos during World War II. Yet German master filmmaker Volker Schlöndorff ( The Tin Drum , Swann in Love ) achieves just that in his latest film, a fact-based account of the final hours before the Allies liberated Paris from German occupation on Aug. 25, 1944. Adapted from French playwright Cyril Gély's 2011 play, Diplomacy isn't a conventional war movie.
NEWS
December 10, 2014 | By Jeff Gammage, Inquirer Staff Writer
On a bunk aboard the troop ship that took him to Vietnam, a soldier called "Little Ty" scrawled a message of hope and home. "See ya at the Blue Sal!" he wrote in August 1967, promising to return to North Philadelphia after a year at war. Ty's canvas rack is now at the Smithsonian, part of the institution's military collection, and a photograph of it is on display at the Independence Seaport Museum in an exhibition of Vietnam-era graffiti. But despite a decade of periodic searches by historians, journalists, and even a Philadelphia detective, Little Ty's identity has remained a mystery.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 3, 2014 | By Stephan Salisbury, Inquirer Staff Writer
The Civil War ended, the constitutional amendments abolishing slavery and establishing civil and legal humanity of African Americans passed - a new day dawned in 19th-century America. Meet the new day, same as the old day. Reconstruction ended in 1877, blacks were disenfranchised, the Supreme Court gave its imprimatur to segregation in 1896; a half-century passed before civil rights dominated the national stage again. Mostly this story is told as it unfolded in the South. But what of the North?
NEWS
November 25, 2014 | By Melanie Burney, Inquirer Staff Writer
Newly arrived Iraqi refugee Razan Alkasey struggled Sunday to find the right words to explain the meaning of Thanksgiving. After recounting a harrowing escape from Baghdad with her four sons and a daughter and only a few belongings, Alkasey, 48, easily embraced the American holiday tradition and ticked off a list. "I thank God for freedom," she said. "I thank God we are all together. I thank God for everything, for giving me this opportunity to come here for a new life. " Alkasey was among about 200 refugees who attended a festive gathering to share a Thanksgiving meal at the Old Pine Community Center in South Philadelphia.
NEWS
November 19, 2014 | Inquirer Editorial Board
Is the technology-powered transportation network UberX a dangerous "illegal hack taxi" service, as Philadelphia Parking Authority chieftain Vince Fenerty quaintly insisted in a recent Inquirer op-ed? Or is it a forward-looking taxi alternative that, as a spokesman insists, merely provides "the safe and reliable rides that Pennsylvanians need and deserve"? According to a paradoxical Public Utility Commission ruling last week, it's both. The commission gave Uber, the San Francisco-based company whose low-cost ride-sharing network is called UberX, a two-year license to provide its presumably safe and reliable rides throughout most of the commonwealth.
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