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War And Peace

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SPORTS
January 5, 2010
DOES BILL SIMMONS know that Red Auerbach used to ban the distribution of postgame box scores in the Boston locker room? "Statistics are for losers," Auerbach would grumble on his way to another NBA championship. Surely Simmons must know that. He grew up in Boston, adored the Celtics. Still adores the Celtics. How else can you explain why he would list John Havlicek as the 13th best player in NBA history, ahead of Elgin Baylor, ahead of Julius Erving, ahead of Scottie Pippen in a book he's written called, "The Book of Basketball.
NEWS
August 17, 2003
Knowing all we know now, the reference to Iraq's attempt to acquire uranium from Africa should not have been included in the President's speech. Unidentified Bush administration official, July 7 I take personal responsibility for everything I say, of course. Absolutely. I also take responsibility for making decisions on war and peace. And I analyzed a thorough body of intelligence . . . that led me to come to [the] conclusion that it was necessary to remove Saddam Hussein from power.
NEWS
November 6, 1995
The passions in the Mideast - on war and peace, about the future of Israeli and Arab alike, on rights and offenses - had blazed white-hot for so long that the assassination of Israeli Prime Minister Yitzhak Rabin should not have been so surprising. Yet it is deeply shocking, sad and fearsome. Rabin was a man great history had made: a courageous fighter of 26 when Israel was born in 1948, a savvy strategist of 45 when Israel won the stunning 1967 victory. He became a great man who made history - a chief architect of coexistence as the cornerstone of security in that meeting place of the world.
NEWS
May 8, 2011
James McCartney, 85, a longtime Washington correspondent and columnist, died of cancer Friday at his home in Holmes Beach, Fla. Mr. McCartney covered foreign affairs and defense policy in Washington, first for the Chicago Daily News from 1959 to 1965 and then for Knight-Ridder Newspapers from 1968 until 1995. He also taught courses on the media and foreign policy and politics at Georgetown University. After he retired to Florida, Mr. McCartney wrote a monthly column for the Herald in Bradenton.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 12, 2006 | By Frank Wilson INQUIRER BOOKS EDITOR
To get a handle on Tolstoy's War and Peace, it's important to read it at just the right tempo. The book is long - 1,358 pages in Anthony Briggs' new and eminently fluent translation (Viking, $40) - but also surprisingly economical: only as long as it needs to be. So this huge cavalcade of balls and battles is best taken at an amble. Go any faster and you're likely to miss what it's all about. But how could you possibly overlook something as large-scale as Napoleon's ill-fated invasion of Russia?
NEWS
February 22, 1996 | By Thomas J. Brady, with reports from Inquirer wire services
NO PEACE FOR READERS LEFT DANGLING AT END OF BOOK Readers left dangling at the end of Leo Tolstoy's voluminous War and Peace can now pick up an equally hefty sequel released this week by a Moscow publisher. Pierre and Natasha, a two-volume, 970-page extravaganza, issued by Vagrius publishers, is expected to reach Russian bookstores by the end of the month, the English-language Moscow Times reported. The book was written by one Vasily Staroi, a pseudonym for an unknown author, the newspaper said.
NEWS
September 23, 2004
'The choice is not between war and peace, the choice is between war and something much worse. " We need to look no further than the recent events at the school in Russia to find out exactly what "something much worse" is. With our idiotic political correctness and suicidal immigration policies, this horrific scenario can easily be played out at a grade school near you. The Muslim terrorists consider this barbarism a great success and are...
NEWS
May 30, 2006
THE LASTEST alleged bin Laden tape raises even more questions regarding the "official version" of 9/11. Why would bin Laden wait until immediately after Moussaoui's sentencing to proclaim his innocence? Why do we never hear anything regarding the actual process by which these tapes are authenticated? Are we to accept the word of the same intelligence authorities who assured us of the presence of WMDs in Iraq? Perhaps the tapes should be analyzed by independent experts before expecting the repeatedly duped American population to accept these findings at face value.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 15, 2012 | BY MOLLY EICHEL, eichelm@phillynews.com 215-854-5909
LET'S BE honest here: "Downton Abbey" isn't the manliest of television shows. It's a highly addictive soap opera dressed up nice with a British accent. Despite "Saturday Night Live" parodies announcing a run on the uber-masculine Spike TV, "Downton's" love triangles, backstabbing and pretty costumes seem to spurn those with an XY chromosome. But men are watching. PBS doesn't have specific demographic numbers and while the network knows the show skews female, they anecdotally acknowledge that men are watching.
NEWS
January 22, 1991 | By Ellen O'Brien, Inquirer Staff Writer Inquirer correspondents Tina Kelly and Mike Franolich contributed to this article
It was snowing hard and temperatures were dropping outside the Quaker meetinghouse on Main Street in Moorestown when the Martin Luther King Day observance for peace began yesterday morning. It was still snowing, and the air was freezing, when the meeting ended hours later - down a two-lane highway a mile away, at the General Electric Aegis Naval Combat testing site - as local police carted off eight activists demonstrating against the war in the Persian Gulf. Everyone was polite: the eight men and women barricading GE's chain-link gate; the police officers who arrested them; the 70 demonstrators lined up at the edge of a field across the road; the lone anti-protest protester there with a video camera, who said he was taping the action for his brother serving on an Aegis battleship - even the police Rottweiler that danced from one huge paw to the other in the slush.
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ENTERTAINMENT
November 22, 2012
By Alice Munro Knopf. 336 pp. $26.95 Reviewed by Susan Balée Alice Munro is not going gentle into that good night. Dear Life strikes me as Munro's best collection yet, and I have read and loved them all. If this turns out to be the octogenarian's last book, it will show that age served only to sharpen her powers of observation. Imagine Munro's creative mind at work: a bright blue eye taking in the landscape of human foibles, a scouring gaze that nevertheless thrums with compassion.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 10, 2012 | Reviewed by Chris Patsilelis
The Man Who Saved the Union Ulysses Grant in War and Peace By H.W. Brands Doubleday. 718 pp. $35   The life of Ulysses S. Grant makes mincemeat of F. Scott Fitzgerald's remark that in American society there are no second acts. Grant graduated toward the low end of his West Point class, served bravely during the Mexican War, resigned his commission because of his drinking, became a hardscrabble farmer, went broke, virtually saved the Union as general of the Union armies in the Civil War, and was twice elected president of the United States.
NEWS
September 7, 2012
Below are excerpts of President Obama's remarks, including his goals for a second term, as prepared for delivery and released by the Obama campaign. But when all is said and done - when you pick up that ballot to vote - you will face the clearest choice of any time in a generation. Over the next few years, big decisions will be made in Washington, on jobs and the economy; taxes and deficits; energy and education; war and peace - decisions that will have a huge impact on our lives and our children's lives for decades to come.
SPORTS
February 29, 2012 | BY STAN HOCHMAN, For the Daily News
THERE IS NOTHING wrong with Ilya Bryzgalov that a slick interpreter can't cure. Never mind the goalie's early-season lament that he was lost in the woods. What he is, is lost in translation. Too often, the quirky statements he makes are misinterpreted. Take the latest cry for help, that he hopes to "find peace in his soul to play in this city. " That is the way it was reported and it sounded gloomier than a Stalingrad winter. Listen closely and the anguished moaning can be explained in other ways.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 15, 2012 | BY MOLLY EICHEL, eichelm@phillynews.com 215-854-5909
LET'S BE honest here: "Downton Abbey" isn't the manliest of television shows. It's a highly addictive soap opera dressed up nice with a British accent. Despite "Saturday Night Live" parodies announcing a run on the uber-masculine Spike TV, "Downton's" love triangles, backstabbing and pretty costumes seem to spurn those with an XY chromosome. But men are watching. PBS doesn't have specific demographic numbers and while the network knows the show skews female, they anecdotally acknowledge that men are watching.
NEWS
May 12, 2011 | By Dick Polman, For The Inquirer
When I first heard that Newt Gingrich was mapping a Republican presidential bid - he formally announced Wednesday - I recalled what conservative Sen. Tom Coburn said recently about the guy. It sure wasn't pretty. Coburn was a Newt soldier back in the '90s, when Newt was riding high as House speaker and conservative Pied Piper. Nevertheless, Coburn told C-SPAN in March that "having served under him in the House, he's probably not one I would choose to support" for the presidency.
NEWS
May 8, 2011
James McCartney, 85, a longtime Washington correspondent and columnist, died of cancer Friday at his home in Holmes Beach, Fla. Mr. McCartney covered foreign affairs and defense policy in Washington, first for the Chicago Daily News from 1959 to 1965 and then for Knight-Ridder Newspapers from 1968 until 1995. He also taught courses on the media and foreign policy and politics at Georgetown University. After he retired to Florida, Mr. McCartney wrote a monthly column for the Herald in Bradenton.
NEWS
May 28, 2010
AS I WRITE this, Aric should be somewhere between Afghanistan and Fort Bragg, N.C. "Somewhere between" pretty much describes the life of a career soldier in a time of perpetual war. They seem to be always in transit, en route, deployed in the Middle East or redeployed back home. They call it rotating, an apt name for the spin cycle they're in. Their lives are an alternating current of tearful good-byes and tearful reunions separated by long stays in places where people try to kill them.
SPORTS
January 5, 2010
DOES BILL SIMMONS know that Red Auerbach used to ban the distribution of postgame box scores in the Boston locker room? "Statistics are for losers," Auerbach would grumble on his way to another NBA championship. Surely Simmons must know that. He grew up in Boston, adored the Celtics. Still adores the Celtics. How else can you explain why he would list John Havlicek as the 13th best player in NBA history, ahead of Elgin Baylor, ahead of Julius Erving, ahead of Scottie Pippen in a book he's written called, "The Book of Basketball.
NEWS
April 23, 2007 | By Michael Currie Schaffer INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Rolling up Roosevelt Boulevard in his pal Ernie DeNofa's black Cadillac Escalade, U.S. Rep. Bob Brady learns someone is mad at him. This is a problem. Not that Brady cares what anyone thinks. Oh, no. As the Philadelphia mayoral candidate will tell anyone, he's not one of those slick, status-seeking pols who spend their whole lives trying to win people over. "I am what I am," he likes to say. Deal with it. But the angry person today is a ward leader and longtime Brady ally: Councilwoman Carol Ann Campbell.
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