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War Chest

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NEWS
April 21, 1988 | By David Lieber, Inquirer Staff Writer
It is the classic story of the powerful incumbent vs. the unknown challenger. State Rep. Matthew J. Ryan (R., Delaware) has raised $78,430 this year in his campaign to retain his House seat in Harrisburg. Edward M. Corse, his Republican opponent in Tuesday's primary for the 168th House District, has raised $6,885, including $2,500 he lent to his campaign. Corse is a supervisor in Newtown Township. Ryan, a former House speaker who is the minority leader in charge of 97 other Republicans in the House, is the cash-rich legislator.
NEWS
September 27, 2006 | By Angela Couloumbis INQUIRER HARRISBURG BUREAU
Once again making Pennsylvania fund-raising history, Gov. Rendell yesterday reported having just under $14 million in his campaign war chest with six weeks left to the election - a record amount for a gubernatorial candidate at this late stage of the campaign. At the same time, Rendell's GOP opponent, former Pittsburgh Steeler Lynn Swann, trailed far behind, with $3.7 million in the bank. That, combined with polls showing Rendell leading by double digits, led many political analysts yesterday to say it will be difficult, if not impossible, for Swann to turn this into a competitive race.
NEWS
October 17, 2012 | BY SEAN COLLINS WALSH, Daily News Staff Writer
REPUBLICAN U.S. Rep. Mike Fitzpatrick's campaign juggernaut showed its muscle in recent months, doubling up a well-financed opponent in spending from July through September, according to filings released Monday by the Federal Election Commission. Democratic challenger Kathy Boockvar, who collected an impressive $520,000 during the three-month span, actually outpaced the congressman in contributions from individuals and spent about $741,000. Fitzpatrick, however, had built up a war chest of donations from party affiliates, special-interest groups and industry PACs, and spent almost $1.5 million during that period, which is key for nuts-and-bolts campaigning.
NEWS
June 20, 1991 | by Dave Davies, Daily News Staff Writer
Now that Bill Gray is leaving Congress, what happens to the cash left in his campaign committee? It isn't clear whether there will be anything left, but if there is, Gray can pocket up to about $32,000, according to federal election law. The law was changed in 1980 to prohibit the conversion of campaign funds "to personal use," but the new rule didn't apply to those already serving in Congress, a club that included Gray. Another change in 1989 limited the amount that officials could keep of the balance on hand in November of that year, a figure that Scott Wexler of the Federal Election Commission estimates at $32,000 for Gray.
NEWS
October 20, 2006 | By Rusty Pray INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The Fourth Congressional District is Chris Smith country. The Republican has been serving it in the House of Representatives for 26 years. Over the years, he has sponsored legislation on important issues, including genocide, human trafficking and torture victims. He is an advocate for veterans' rights. He serves on several committees, and is vice chairman of the House Committee on International Relations. He has a campaign war chest of close to a half a million dollars, while his Democratic challenger, Carol Gay, is running for office for the first time.
NEWS
June 21, 1991 | By Doreen Carvajal, Inquirer Staff Writer Inquirer staff writer S.A. Paolantonio also contributed to this article
The war of rhetoric has yet to start, but the low-key battle for campaign cash is already being waged in New York boardrooms and swank Philadelphia hotels. Yesterday, Republican mayoral candidate Frank L. Rizzo emerged the underdog with just enough cash to buy a used Buick and debts that amount to a mortgage on a Society Hill home. His Democratic rival, Edward G. Rendell, was the fund-raising front-runner, amassing more than $2 million since he started his quest to be mayor and stuffing $148,000 in the war chest for the general election.
NEWS
May 28, 1987 | By Thomas Turcol, Inquirer Trenton Bureau
Cherry Hill Mayor Maria Barnaby Greenwald, whose candidacy for the state Senate has buoyed Democratic hopes of unseating Sixth District Republican Sen. Lee B. Laskin this fall, is accumulating a campaign war chest that is the envy of even the local GOP organization. Greenwald is part of a Democratic ticket that has raised $63,900, according to campaign-finance reports filed with the New Jersey Election Law Enforcement Commission. The ticket, called "Democrats for a New Direction," also includes state Assembly candidates John J. Tarditi Jr. and Patrick J. Brennan.
NEWS
June 6, 1988 | By Nancy Phillips, Special to The Inquirer
They climbed the spiral staircase to the Cherry Hill Inn's elegant Starlite Room and basked in the sparkle of twinkling white lights. At linen-draped tables topped with baskets of flowers, they sipped drinks, sampled gourmet food from silver platters and hobnobbed with Cherry Hill politicos. More than 250 people paid $100 apiece to attend a fund-raising event last week for Democratic Mayor Susan Bass Levin and her allies on the Township Council. The event was sponsored by New Visions for Cherry Hill, a new political-action committee of which Levin is chairman.
NEWS
June 16, 1995 | By Craig R. McCoy and Peter Nicholas, INQUIRER STAFF WRITERS Staff writer Vanessa Williams contributed to this article
The money is pouring in. From lawyers, corporate executives and organized labor. From firms that do millions of dollars of business with City Hall, casino interests eyeing future riverboat-gambling licenses, and philanthropists asking nothing in return. It's all fueling the Ed Rendell juggernaut. The latest campaign finance reports, released yesterday, show the mayor having raised a stunning $4.6 million. A review of the 2,800 separate contributions banked by the campaign since Jan. 1, 1992, shows two dozen contributors giving $25,000 or more apiece.
NEWS
October 30, 1991 | by Dave Davies, Daily News Staff Writer
Just when you thought it was safe to watch "Jeopardy" again. Bumped from prime-time commercial airwaves, Philadelphia's mayoral candidates served up surprisingly lively TV fare in their second debate last night, showing more substance and trading sharper punches than they had a week ago. Republican Joseph Egan attacked Democrat Edward Rendell for his handling of the 1985 MOVE investigation and for his gaudy campaign war chest. The two were joined at Channel 6 studios on City Avenue by Consumer candidate Pamela Lawler and independent Dennis Wesley.
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NEWS
June 30, 2015 | By Madison Russ, Inquirer Staff Writer
HARRISBURG - Legislators may be in the midst of a contentious budget season, but they aren't letting the possibility of a partial government shutdown get in the way of their own fund-raising. Lawmakers raising campaign cash when they make the trek to the Capitol to vote on legislation is a long-established practice. But in the month of June, when elected officials are making decisions about the state's finances in preparation for the start of the new fiscal year on July 1, fund-raising goes into overdrive.
NEWS
October 17, 2012 | BY SEAN COLLINS WALSH, Daily News Staff Writer
REPUBLICAN U.S. Rep. Mike Fitzpatrick's campaign juggernaut showed its muscle in recent months, doubling up a well-financed opponent in spending from July through September, according to filings released Monday by the Federal Election Commission. Democratic challenger Kathy Boockvar, who collected an impressive $520,000 during the three-month span, actually outpaced the congressman in contributions from individuals and spent about $741,000. Fitzpatrick, however, had built up a war chest of donations from party affiliates, special-interest groups and industry PACs, and spent almost $1.5 million during that period, which is key for nuts-and-bolts campaigning.
NEWS
January 19, 2012 | By Suzette Parmley, Inquirer Staff Writer
When casino mogul Sheldon Adelson wrote a $5 million check this month to a super PAC backing his close friend Newt Gingrich, it was the largest donation the executive had ever made to a candidate in an election cycle. Aides close to the 78-year-old billionaire, whose company, Las Vegas Sands Corp., owns the Sands Bethlehem Casino Resort, about an hour's drive from Philadelphia, say the contribution reflects Adelson's penchant for making high-risk bets - with high payoff. It also showcases the growing influence of super PACs on the presidential campaign.
NEWS
September 30, 2011
The Daily Telegraph of London calls him "the most talked about figure in American politics. " Yes, that's Chris Christie, the ever-quotable governor of New Jersey, who for the past month has played the role of coy maiden, with the Republican Party cast as his persistent suitor. "I can't help it that people like me," Christie seems to say without speaking those actual words, as he continually rebuffs heartfelt entreaties to become the party's standard bearer in the 2012 presidential election.
NEWS
February 1, 2011 | By CATHERINE LUCEY & CHRIS BRENNAN, luceyc@phillynews.com 215-854-4172
It's an old saying that money talks. But the 2010 campaign-finance reports filed yesterday tell all kinds of stories about the May primary election. As we hurtle toward a primary election packed with competitive fights for City Council, the City Commission, sheriff and more - here's what you need to know about the candidates' finances: Nutter's war chest Mayor Nutter - who is still without a primary opponent - ended the year with slightly less money than he started with.
NEWS
October 2, 2010 | By Thomas Fitzgerald, Inquirer Staff Writer
WILMINGTON - Christine O'Donnell now has an entourage. As the Republican Senate nominee shuttled between the reception in her new campaign headquarters and a corner office Friday, a half dozen aides trailed with portfolios and advice. A muscled bodyguard wearing an earpiece and an olive-green military jacket secured the doorway. Since her upset win in Delaware's GOP primary Sept. 14, the tea party-backed O'Donnell had virtually disappeared from public. She emerged Friday with an invitation-only Republican unity rally and headquarters opening.
NEWS
July 14, 2010 | By Thomas Fitzgerald, Inquirer Staff Writer
Republican Senate candidate Pat Toomey said Tuesday that he raised $3.1 million in the second quarter, leaving him with more than twice the cash of his Democratic opponent, Rep. Joe Sestak. Sestak raised $1.95 million, bouncing back quickly after draining his accounts to defeat Sen. Arlen Specter in the May 18 Democratic primary. He had about $2 million on hand as of June 30, his campaign said. Both campaigns released the bottom-line numbers they planned to report Thursday to the Federal Election Commission, providing an early look at the financial state of a general-election race expected to be one of the nation's most competitive.
NEWS
February 5, 2010 | By Patrick Kerkstra INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
After just two years on the job, Democratic City Councilman Bill Green has emerged as Mayor Nutter's highest-profile political opponent and a leading contender for higher office. Helping to fuel Green's sudden ascendancy has been his image as a City Hall reformer, a newcomer to the political scene known for speaking bluntly and bruising egos as he seeks to shake up a city government that he considers complacent and inefficient. Yet despite his rabble-rousing reputation, Green enjoys the financial backing of some of the city's most entrenched interest groups and veteran power-brokers.
NEWS
November 10, 2009 | By Jonathan Tamari INQUIRER TRENTON BUREAU
Former State Sen. Wayne Bryant's fight to use his campaign account to pay for his criminal defense went to the New Jersey Supreme Court yesterday. Bryant, convicted last year on corruption charges, should be allowed to use his political war chest to pay lawyers who have defended him, said Angelo Genova, his attorney at yesterday's hearing. Genova said the state's Election Law Enforcement Commission (ELEC) previously let another senator use campaign cash to defend himself against ethics complaints brought to a legislative panel.
NEWS
February 3, 2009 | By Andrew Maykuth and Marcia Gelbart INQUIRER STAFF WRITERS
If the Democratic primary for Philadelphia district attorney were decided on campaign contributions alone, Dan McCaffrey would be running away with the race. McCaffrey, a former assistant district attorney and brother of state Supreme Court Justice Seamus McCaffrey, reported a campaign treasury of $243,000 at the end of the year - more than double the amount of his next-closest competitor in the May 19 primary. McCaffrey loaned the campaign $50,000. He raised $100,000 from political action committees, much of it from labor unions.
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