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War Crimes

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NEWS
May 4, 2012 | By Toby Sterling, Associated Press
AMSTERDAM - Former Liberian president Charles Taylor deserves an 80-year sentence for the war crimes he was convicted of last week, including aiding and abetting murder and rape on a mass scale, prosecutors said in a written filing Thursday. Judges at the Special Court for Sierra Leone ruled April 26 that Taylor played a crucial role in helping rebels continue a bloody rampage during that West African nation's 11-year civil war, which ended in 2002 with more than 50,000 dead. They found Taylor guilty of 11 counts of war crimes and crimes against humanity for his role in arming the Sierra Leone rebels in exchange for "blood diamonds" mined by slave laborers and smuggled across the border.
NEWS
December 7, 1987 | From Inquirer Wire Services
The commission handpicked by Austrian President Kurt Waldheim to investigate his assertions of innocence in Nazi war crimes will reveal evidence that is likely to force his resignation, the Chicago Sun-Times reported yesterday. Alois Mock, a leader of Austria's ruling coalition, has told British and U.S. officials that when the commission's report is made public next month, he will divorce himself and his People's Conservative Party from Waldheim, the Sun-Times said in a London-datelined article.
NEWS
March 14, 2006
"Justice delayed is justice denied," said William E. Gladstone, the 19th century British prime minister. Somewhere in hell, Slobodan Milosevic is nodding his head. The world - and more important, surviviors of the old Yugoslavia - now will never know what verdict would have been rendered in the case brought against Milosevic by an international war-crimes tribunal. That is a shame. It's a loss for the cause of finding justice for crimes against humanity. Milosevic, 64 and suffering from heart problems and high blood pressure, died last weekend in his jail cell in the Hague, the Dutch city where the tribunal is located.
NEWS
May 27, 2011 | By Dusan Stojanovic, Associated Press
BELGRADE, Serbia - After 16 years on the run, a frail and haggard Ratko Mladic was hauled before a judge Thursday - the first step in facing charges for international war crimes, including the slaughter of 8,000 Muslim men and boys in the Bosnian town of Srebrenica in 1995. No longer the fearsome, bullnecked military commander, Mladic, 69, was arrested by Serbian intelligence agents in a predawn raid at a relative's house in a northern Serbia village. The act was trumpeted by the government as a victory for a country worthy of European Union membership and Western embrace.
NEWS
June 13, 2003 | Daily News wire services
House OKs own tax bill, snubbing Bush, Senate Defying President Bush and Senate Republicans, the House yesterday approved an $82 billion tax-cut bill that would make 6.5 million low-income families wait a year to get a child tax credit everyone else will get this year. The vote also sets up a fight with the Senate, which passed a $10 billion measure that would give tax rebates this year to poor families and certain military personnel. Both of those groups were left out of the $330 billion tax-cut measure Bush ushered through Congress last month, and Bush and Senate Republicans reacted to criticism it was further evidence the tax cuts favored the rich at the expense of the poor.
NEWS
October 25, 1992 | By Carlin Romano, Inquirer Book Critic
THE ANATOMY OF THE NUREMBERG TRIALS By Telford Taylor Alfred A. Knopf. 703 pp. $35 Two months into the first Nuremberg trial of Nazi war criminals that followed World War II, Sir Norman Birkett, the alternate British judge on a tribunal that included French, Soviet, British and American justices, shared his thoughts with a friend: The thing that sustains me is the knowledge that this trial can be a very great landmark in the history...
NEWS
November 30, 2012 | By Nebi Qena and Mike Corder, Associated Press
PRISTINA, Kosovo - A former prime minister of Kosovo pledged a return Thursday to political life after a U.N. war-crimes tribunal acquitted him for the second time of murdering and torturing Serbs and their supporters in Kosovo's war for independence. Ramush Haradinaj returned to jubilant crowds in Kosovo and was given the red carpet treatment and greeted by Prime Minister Hashim Thaci. "I am happy that international justice has confirmed our path to freedom was just and clean," Haradinaj said during a news conference flanked by Thaci.
NEWS
March 3, 1993 | BY JACK MCKINNEY
Who is the United Nations Security Council trying to scare with its threats of retribution for war crimes in the Balkans? That kind of rhetoric certainly did nothing to halt the criminal ways of Iraq's Saddam Hussein. Only one week after the security council aimed its Resolution 808 at "serious violations of international humanitarian law in the territory of former Yugoslavia since 1991," a less influential section of the U.N. heard a fact-finder's account of the genocidal campaign Saddam has waged over the same span of time against the Marsh Arabs of Southern Iraq.
NEWS
February 26, 1993 | by Gloria Campisi, Daily News Staff Writer
Jerome Shestack has put away the bulletproof vest. But the prominent Philadelphia attorney can't put away the tales of atrocities heard in a recent visit to the Balkans, where he took the vest he borrowed with him for protection. Or the feelings of disillusionment that besiege him and others in the human rights movement as they watch whole regions of the world ripped apart by factional hatreds. Shestack, chairman of the International League for Human Rights, last month led a delegation to gather evidence of atrocities in Bosnia to present to a United Nations commission on war crimes.
NEWS
July 2, 2012 | By Mike Corder, Associated Press
THE HAGUE, Netherlands - Ten years ago, the treaty that created the International Criminal Court came into force, creating the world's first permanent war-crimes tribunal. But as the anniversary is marked Sunday, allegations of state-sponsored atrocities in Syria are piling up and the court stands powerless to intervene, while the first person it indicted, Ugandan warlord Joseph Kony, is still at large and his brutal militia, the Lord's Resistance Army, continues its reign of terror.
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NEWS
July 14, 2016
Goran Hadzic, 58, the former leader of rebel Serbs in Croatia, died Tuesday at the hospital in Novi Sad in northern Serbia. He was suffering from brain cancer. Hadzic was arrested in 2011 and faced war-crimes charges for his leadership of a campaign to carve off one-third of Croatia and join it to Serbia. The U.N. war-crimes tribunal in the Hague dropped the case against him because of his terminal illness and released him from jail last year. Hadzic had pleaded not guilty to involvement in the murder of hundreds of Croats and expulsion of tens of thousands more from their homeland during Croatia's 1991-95 war when ethnic Serbs rebelled against independence from the Serb-led Yugoslavia.
NEWS
July 6, 2016
I WASN'T in Philly yet for the notorious Bicentennial non-celebration in 1976. A teenager then, I had only a vague understanding that a beyond-Nixon paranoid Mayor Frank Rizzo had warned citizens that the Manson Family was planning to spike the Schuylkill with LSD or some such thing. Everybody here stayed home (or so legend has it), and New York - with its tall ships and fireworks back in the day when people still actually liked fireworks - stole the day from Philadelphia. Again. Like DiMaggio in Game 2 of the '50 World Series all over again.
NEWS
November 6, 2015 | BY GARY THOMPSON, Daily News Staff Writer thompsg@phillynews.com, 215-854-5992
THE workmanlike German-language drama "Labyrinth of Lies" delves into the so-called Frankfurt-Auschwitz trials of the early 1960s. Nazis had been tried for war crimes at Nuremberg, in Poland and in Israel, but the Frankfurt-Auschwitz trials had a particular resonance and meaning: Germans prosecuted by Germans, under German criminal law. The technicalities involved were legally and morally mind-boggling. The government could charge offenders, former SS men, only for specific acts committed outside the parameters of a soldier's hideous "duties.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 6, 2015 | Gary Thompson, Daily News Movie Critic
The workmanlike German-language drama Labyrinth of Lies delves into the so-called Frankfurt-Auschwitz trials of the early 1960s. Nazis had been tried for war crimes at Nuremberg, in Poland, and in Israel, but the Frankfurt-Auschwitz trials had a particular resonance and meaning: Germans prosecuted by Germans, under German criminal law. The technicalities involved were legally and morally mind-boggling. The government could only charge offenders, former SS men, for specific acts committed outside the parameters of a soldier's hideous "duties.
NEWS
June 12, 2015 | By Michael Matza, Inquirer Staff Writer
When anthropologist Philippe Bourgois began the research for his Ph.D. in 1981, he never imagined that the scenes he witnessed in El Salvador would haunt him decades later. "I thought I'd be staying relatively safely in refugee camps," he said. "The invasion that I got trapped in took everybody by surprise. " Thirty-four years later, the experience of running for his life amid El Salvador's civil war, and hiding in caves for 10 days before escaping across the Lempa River into Honduras, is never far from his mind.
NEWS
June 20, 2014 | By Jeremy Roebuck, Inquirer Staff Writer
Stooped, slightly dazed, and hobbling with a cane for support, 89-year-old Johann Breyer shuffled into a federal courtroom Wednesday to account once again for his role in atrocities committed nearly a lifetime ago. Federal authorities arrested the retired Northeast Philadelphia toolmaker, who worked as an armed guard at two Nazi death camps during World War II, and said they would support a bid to send him back to Germany, where he was charged Tuesday...
NEWS
December 23, 2013 | By Trudy Rubin, Inquirer Columnist
GAZIANTEP, Turkey - The three young Syrian women had managed to escape from the rebel-held section of Aleppo for a few days' rest across the border in Turkey. Asma, 26, a university graduate in English literature, has been volunteering for the past two years as a nurse in a field hospital, treating civilian victims of the war, which has divided Aleppo into conflict zones held by the rebels and the regime. Salam, 30, and Islam, 28, sisters who were teachers before the war, are volunteers in an orphanage that shelters 650 children who lost parents in the fighting.
NEWS
November 7, 2013 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Inquirer Staff Writer
Herbert R. Weiman Sr., 88, of Wynnewood, an attorney in Philadelphia for 50 years, died Monday, Nov. 4, of cancer at Bryn Mawr Hospital. After training at the University of Pennsylvania Law School, Mr. Weiman maintained a law practice on Allegheny Avenue in Port Richmond and also on John F. Kennedy Boulevard in Center City. His specialty was family law. He chaired the Family Law Section of the Philadelphia Bar Association, and in 1980, was instrumental in enacting a new divorce code for Pennsylvania.
NEWS
May 8, 2013 | By David Rising, Associated Press
BERLIN - A 93-year-old man who was deported from the United States for lying about his Nazi past was arrested by German authorities Monday on allegations that he served as an Auschwitz death camp guard, Stuttgart prosecutors said. Hans Lipschis was taken into custody after authorities concluded there was "compelling evidence" he was involved in crimes at Auschwitz while there from 1941 to 1945, prosecutor Claudia Krauth said. Lipschis has acknowledged being assigned to an SS guard unit at Auschwitz but maintains he served only as a cook and was not involved in any war crimes.
NEWS
April 7, 2013
Rallies, clashes in Bangladesh DHAKA, Bangladesh - Hundreds of thousands of members of a hard-line Muslim group rallied in Bangladesh's capital on Saturday to demand authorities enact anti-blasphemy laws to punish people who insult Islam. Separately, members of the group, Hifazat-e-Islam, clashed with police and pro-government activists in a district outside of the capital, leaving a supporter of the ruling party dead. The massive rally in Dhaka took place amid heightened security in the capital and elsewhere after Hifazat-e-Islam members targeted bloggers who they say are atheists.
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