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War Emblem

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May 20, 2002 | By Joe Logan INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The morning after War Emblem won the Preakness, the question was, Can he do it again? Can he win the Belmont Stakes and the Triple Crown? His trainer, Bob Baffert, thinks so. "You've all been waiting for that super horse - well, you've got him," Baffert said yesterday as he prepared to ship the winner of the Kentucky Derby and Saturday's Preakness home to Churchill Downs in Kentucky before hopping a plane for his home in Southern California....
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August 4, 2002 | By Craig Donnelly INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
It has been nearly two months since War Emblem's stumbling start in the Belmont Stakes cost him a chance to become the first Triple Crown winner in 24 years. Last month, War Emblem's owner, Prince Ahmed bin Salman, died of an apparent heart attack, and his death forced a temporary postponement of the horse's journey from California to compete in the $1 million Haskell Invitational Handicap (Grade I) at 1 1/8 miles today at Monmouth Park. But when the connections of Came Home, a winner of five stakes this season and the most formidable opponent to War Emblem, decided to cancel their plans to run in the Haskell and War Emblem turned in an impressive workout at Del Mar on Monday, trainer Bob Baffert reconsidered his plans and had War Emblem flown to New Jersey.
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August 26, 2002 | Daily News Wire Services
War Emblem caught a bad break again and was upset by Came Home in the $1 million Pacific Classic yesterday at Del Mar, Calif. War Emblem, the Kentucky Derby and Preakness winner, appeared to be caught off guard when the starting gate opened in the 1 1/4-mile race. He had to be loaded into the gate twice. War Emblem, the 6-5 wagering favorite, finished sixth in his first race against older horses. The 3-year-old who loves to run at the front, didn't make the lead and was third most of the way around the seaside track.
SPORTS
June 6, 2008 | By Mike Jensen INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Every move Big Brown makes tomorrow will be analyzed as the colt races for the Triple Crown in the Belmont Stakes. But in Big Brown's next career, other moves will be followed even more closely. Here's the evidence: War Emblem, the 2002 winner of the Kentucky Derby and Preakness Stakes, now a stallion in Japan, is "responding well to therapy for a breeding behavior dysfunction," according to a specialist at the University of Pennsylvania's New Bolton Center who has been consulting on his case.
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May 19, 2002 | By Joe Logan INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Two weeks and a day ago, few people in thoroughbred horse racing had heard of War Emblem. The world has heard of him now. After a gutsy, come-from-behind victory yesterday in the Preakness Stakes, the horse that not long ago had no name, no credentials and no respect has a chance to become the first Triple Crown winner in 24 years and only the 12th in history. "I like my chances - third time's a charm," said Bob Baffert, War Emblem's flashy, self-confident and much-resented trainer, who twice before has won the first two legs of the Triple Crown, with Silver Charm in 1997 and Real Quiet in '98, only to lose at the Belmont Stakes.
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May 5, 2002 | By Joe Logan INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Wait. Wait. Wait. Do not - repeat, do not - let War Emblem grab the early lead and burn himself out too quickly. Those were the final instructions that trainer Bob Baffert hammered into the head of his young jockey, Victor Espinoza, heading into the 128th Kentucky Derby yesterday. Baffert might as well have been whistling in the dark. Whether Espinoza, riding in only his second Derby, wanted him to or not, War Emblem burst out of Gate 6, quickly grabbed the lead, and never faltered as the unheralded 20-1 long shot won the Run for the Roses in commanding fashion.
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June 6, 2002 | By Joe Logan INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Two down, only the biggest race of his life to go. But with War Emblem, his prized if improbable thoroughbred, on the threshold of history, trainer Bob Baffert is not about to let the world see him sweat now. "The farther they go, the better he is," Baffert, cocky and comfortable as ever in the spotlight, said yesterday. "That's why I've always thought the Belmont would be the easiest. " If Baffert is right and War Emblem, who only six weeks ago was thought to be a sprinter, can handle the grueling 1 1/2-mile Belmont Stakes, he would become the first horse in 24 years and only the 12th in history to win racing's Triple Crown.
SPORTS
May 16, 2002 | By Joe Logan INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
If Kentucky Derby winner War Emblem doesn't claim the second leg of the Triple Crown this Saturday in the Preakness, it won't be because of a lousy post position. The trainer of the 20-1 longshot who stunned the horse world in Kentucky drew the No. 1 pick in yesterday's post position selection process, giving Bob Baffert the right to pick precisely the spot he wanted for War Emblem in the field of 13. To the surprise of some racing insiders, who expected Baffert to take the conventionally popular 4, 5 or 6 positions, Baffert opted for gate 8. "A lot of speed horses wanted to go outside of us," said Baffert, explaining his ploy of keeping War Emblem close to the middle, yet far enough outside to limit the potential threats from his right flank.
SPORTS
June 8, 2002 | By Joe Logan INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Bob Baffert took shelter from the rain beneath a small trackside tower yesterday morning. Watching his horse, War Emblem, go through a workout, the trainer had a sudden moment of panic. "Get out of there!" yelled Baffert at an exercise rider atop another horse. Who could blame Baffert for his outburst? His golden boy of a black thoroughbred today seeks to make himself a legend by winning the Belmont Stakes to become only the 12th runner in history to capture the Triple Crown.
SPORTS
June 7, 2002 | By Joe Logan INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
In the days and weeks leading up to tomorrow's run for the Triple Crown, the pressure and focus, of course, have been on War Emblem, but also on trainer Bob Baffert. Yet, tomorrow, once the starting gate flies open, and all the money, glory and history are on the line, Baffert's work is done. Once the gate opens, all the pressure rests on the small, but muscular, shoulders of jockey Victor Espinoza. "After that, all you can do is watch," Baffert, a certified, card-carrying control freak, lamented yesterday morning, shortly after War Emblem's workout.
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SPORTS
October 31, 2014 | By Dick Jerardi, Daily News Staff Writer
ARCADIA, Calif. - The $5 million Breeders' Cup Classic, America's richest race, is typically run almost exactly 6 months after America's most important race, the Kentucky Derby. In the early days of the Breeders' Cup, which began in 1984, Derby winners were prominent among Classic winners. Who can forget Tom Durkin's wonderful 1987 Classic call, "the Derby winners hit the wire together" when 1986 Derby winner Ferdinand held off 1987 Derby winner Alysheba. The great Alysheba won the 1988 Classic.
SPORTS
May 19, 2014 | By Bob Ford, Inquirer Columnist
BALTIMORE - The story got better for California Chrome on Saturday, and it was pretty good already. The chestnut colt that hasn't lost a race as a 3-year-old followed up his Kentucky Derby victory two weeks ago with an authoritative Preakness Stakes win to set up a potential Triple Crown scenario for the Belmont Stakes on June 7. Twelve other horses have been in this position since Affirmed won the Triple Crown in 1978, and all of them either...
SPORTS
June 8, 2011
OK, I ADMIT it - I love the ponies. Not so much for the betting, but because I love the beauty and the majesty of racehorses. I believe that they are incredible animals with beauty, power and strength, and a competitiveness that rivals that of Michael Jordan and Pete Rose. Even in the face of debilitating injury, they will try to carry on and win. Longtime racing fans will remember Tim Tam, who won the first two legs of the Triple Crown in 1958 but was seriously injured in the Belmont, still trying gamely to make it to the finish line.
SPORTS
August 2, 2010 | By DICK JERARDI, jerardd@phillynews.com
OCEANPORT, N.J. - The Pennsylvania Derby was finally moved off Labor Day with the hope that some of the top 3-year-olds would use the race as a final prep for the Breeders' Cup. There is now a realistic chance Philadelphia Park's signature race could attract the best 3-year-old of them all. After Preakness winner Lookin At Lucky crushed the field in the $1 million Haskell yesterday at Monmouth Park, Mike Pegram, one of Lucky's three owners, was asked...
SPORTS
June 6, 2008 | By Mike Jensen INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Every move Big Brown makes tomorrow will be analyzed as the colt races for the Triple Crown in the Belmont Stakes. But in Big Brown's next career, other moves will be followed even more closely. Here's the evidence: War Emblem, the 2002 winner of the Kentucky Derby and Preakness Stakes, now a stallion in Japan, is "responding well to therapy for a breeding behavior dysfunction," according to a specialist at the University of Pennsylvania's New Bolton Center who has been consulting on his case.
SPORTS
May 25, 2006 | Daily News Wire Services
For just the third time in 36 years, the Belmont Stakes will be run without either the Kentucky Derby or Preakness Stakes winner. Preakness winner Bernardini was declared out of the June 10 on Belmont yesterday, another blow to the final race of the Triple Crown series. The Belmont field already was without Kentucky Derby winner Barbaro, who sustained career-ending injuries in last weekend's Preakness, which Bernardini won by 5 1/4 lengths. In 2000, neither Derby winner Fusaichi Pegasus nor Preakness winner Red Bullet ran the Belmont, won by Commendable.
SPORTS
August 26, 2002 | Daily News Wire Services
War Emblem caught a bad break again and was upset by Came Home in the $1 million Pacific Classic yesterday at Del Mar, Calif. War Emblem, the Kentucky Derby and Preakness winner, appeared to be caught off guard when the starting gate opened in the 1 1/4-mile race. He had to be loaded into the gate twice. War Emblem, the 6-5 wagering favorite, finished sixth in his first race against older horses. The 3-year-old who loves to run at the front, didn't make the lead and was third most of the way around the seaside track.
SPORTS
August 5, 2002 | By Craig Donnelly INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
"When he broke clean, I knew the race was over. " Victor Espinoza was right. The jockey believed that the only way War Emblem would lose yesterday's $1 million Haskell Invitational Handicap at Monmouth Park was to stumble at the start. Such a debacle occurred in the Belmont Stakes, and it may have cost the big black colt the Triple Crown. But War Emblem broke on top in the 1 1/8-mile Grade I classic and cruised to an easy 3 1/2-length victory over a compact group of four rivals.
SPORTS
August 4, 2002 | By Craig Donnelly INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
It has been nearly two months since War Emblem's stumbling start in the Belmont Stakes cost him a chance to become the first Triple Crown winner in 24 years. Last month, War Emblem's owner, Prince Ahmed bin Salman, died of an apparent heart attack, and his death forced a temporary postponement of the horse's journey from California to compete in the $1 million Haskell Invitational Handicap (Grade I) at 1 1/8 miles today at Monmouth Park. But when the connections of Came Home, a winner of five stakes this season and the most formidable opponent to War Emblem, decided to cancel their plans to run in the Haskell and War Emblem turned in an impressive workout at Del Mar on Monday, trainer Bob Baffert reconsidered his plans and had War Emblem flown to New Jersey.
SPORTS
June 10, 2002 | By Joe Logan INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
What happened? How did things go so wrong so quickly? For horse trainer Bob Baffert, questions like that no doubt nagged him yesterday morning as he and his packed-up would-be Triple Crown winner, War Emblem, left Belmont Park. "Since the Preakness, we've fretted and worried and got this horse here the best way we know how, and then he never got his chance," Baffert said. He likened the situation to Shaquille O'Neal's "getting ready to play in the NBA Finals and then stubbing his toe and being unable to play.
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