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War Machine

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NEWS
December 6, 1990 | Inquirer Wire Services
Israel has told the United States that it does not want a solution to the Persian Gulf crisis that leaves Iraq's war machine intact, Deputy Foreign Minister Benjamin Netanyahu said yesterday. But Netanyahu played down press reports that Israel had warned Washington that it would take military action against Iraq if the United States failed to do so. In other developments, the Soviet Union indicated that it might compensate the Iraq government for allowing more than 3,000 Soviet workers to leave Iraq before their work contracts expired.
NEWS
May 25, 1992 | By Owen Ullmann, INQUIRER WASHINGTON BUREAU
He may have won the Persian Gulf war, but President Bush is coming under political assault for, his detractors say, bungling relations with Iraq before the war and trying to cover up his blunder afterward. A batch of previously secret administration documents made public by a Democratic congressman creates an embarrassing portrait of a president who courted Saddam Hussein before the invasion of Kuwait and ignored multiple warnings that the policy was a big mistake. House Banking Committee Chairman Henry B. Gonzalez, a Texas Democrat, has been trying for nearly two years to publicize the controversy as the biggest scandal of Bush's presidency - "Iraqgate.
NEWS
February 8, 2005 | By Ken Dilanian INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Down a long, dusty road inside this sprawling former Iraqi military base sit a huge concrete pad and some giant fuel tanks. Next to the pad are a couple of dingy metal trailers. Inside the trailers, the refuelers sit, waiting for the helicopters. When a pair of copters land, two soldiers don radio headsets and run out to fill their tanks. That's what these troops have been doing for the last 11 months, for 12 hours a day, every day - Christmas and New Year's included - with only the occasional day off. "It's been hard, but we keep each other going," said Sgt. Edouardo Thomas, 28, who was born in Haiti.
NEWS
February 14, 1991 | By Dan Hardy, Special to The Inquirer
They call themselves, collectively, the Delaware County peace and social justice movement, though there is no formal organization by that name. They are the people who never stopped demonstrating as the '60s turned into the '70s, '80s and '90s, even as most people shied away from protest. In the last few months, those Delaware County activists, who have been acting separately in pursuit of a variety of goals - ending U.S. military aid to Central America, fighting for an end to homelessness, protesting military spending - have joined together to oppose the Bush administration's actions in the Persian Gulf.
NEWS
April 2, 1991 | By Robert A. Rankin, Inquirer Washington Bureau The Los Angeles Times contributed to this article
The Treasury Department yesterday identified 52 businesses and 37 individuals throughout the world as front companies and agents who secretly helped President Saddam Hussein build Iraq's war machine. While most of the companies are based in the Middle East and London, two were in the United States: Bay Industries Inc. of Santa Monica, Calif., and Matrix Churchill Corp. of Cleveland, a subsidiary of a British firm. Both U.S. companies named reportedly are connected with Anees Mansour Wadi, an Iraqi national and Beverly Hills businessman who was expelled from Britain in September.
NEWS
September 26, 2002
THE BUSH administration's proposed "pre-emptive attack" on Iraq is both immoral and illegal - just like the tragic events of Sept. 11. The American people are being bamboozled by a man who cheated his way into the White House via a fixed election. This proposed war isn't about national security - it's about oil, keeping the war machine running (remember Eisenhower's warning about the military-industrial complex?) and promoting the right-wing ideology of Bush and his henchmen. I hope it won't take thousands of our sons and daughters coming home in body bags to wake up the American public.
NEWS
April 2, 1988 | By Walter F. Naedele, Inquirer Staff Writer
The Chestnut Hill estate known as Krisheim, said to be the largest family estate left in Philadelphia, slumbered through much of the 1960s, through all of the 1970s, through its old age. The spreading lawns and fields bordering the Wissahickon Valley reposed as quietly as a dignified dowager, its family gone, its visitors only an occasional few strangers. But when Stanley T. Woodward Jr. returned in 1981 to live in Philadelphia for the first time since 1937, he came back to the grounds of the Woodward family estate, which lies along both sides of McCallum Street near Mermaid Lane.
NEWS
June 24, 2014 | By Edward Colimore, Inquirer Staff Writer
SEA GIRT, N.J. - The Coasties in the watchtower of the Sea Girt Lighthouse could see the bright flash and hear the massive explosion. Seven miles offshore, the Standard Oil tanker R.P. Resor had been hit by a torpedo from a German U-boat and was taking on water. Two members of the crew survived and 47 died on the night World War II came to the Jersey Shore - just three months after the Pearl Harbor attack. The strike was a wake-up call for the U.S. War Department in late February 1942 and is still remembered by some Shore residents, said Bill Dunn, historian and author of a new book, Sea Girt Lighthouse - The Community Beacon.
NEWS
February 15, 1991 | By Larry Eichel, Inquirer Staff Writer
British officials say that one reason the bombing phase of the Persian Gulf war is now entering a fifth week is that the allied command underestimated the scope and resilience of the Iraqi war machine. In discussions earlier this week in Washington on the decision to keep up the bombing, British Defense Secretary Tom King and his American counterpart, Dick Cheney, said they were "struck" by the size of the Iraqi military establishment. "The extent of their war machine is larger than we anticipated," one highly placed British official said, speaking on the condition that he not be identified.
NEWS
February 20, 1991
President Bush has said the Soviet plan to end the war in the Persian Gulf "falls well short" of what is required. It's hard to judge, since the details are still secret. But, as a ground war seems ever more imminent, the Soviet proposal raises a difficult question: whether the administration would prefer at this point to fight and win on the ground, even if the alternative were an unconditional Iraqi pullout from Kuwait. A month ago, it would have seemed absurd to hesitate over such a choice: forcing Saddam Hussein to withdraw from Kuwait without having to send a single tank against his fortified front lines seemed too much to hope for. But, as the Iraqi regime seems increasingly weakened by the relentless bombing, the possibility of easy success on the ground appears more likely.
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NEWS
June 24, 2014 | By Edward Colimore, Inquirer Staff Writer
SEA GIRT, N.J. - The Coasties in the watchtower of the Sea Girt Lighthouse could see the bright flash and hear the massive explosion. Seven miles offshore, the Standard Oil tanker R.P. Resor had been hit by a torpedo from a German U-boat and was taking on water. Two members of the crew survived and 47 died on the night World War II came to the Jersey Shore - just three months after the Pearl Harbor attack. The strike was a wake-up call for the U.S. War Department in late February 1942 and is still remembered by some Shore residents, said Bill Dunn, historian and author of a new book, Sea Girt Lighthouse - The Community Beacon.
TRAVEL
November 12, 2012 | By Michael Schuman, For The Inquirer
KANSAS CITY, Mo. - A damaged war machine, officially known as a Renault FT-17 tank and commonly used by American forces during World War I, rests in retirement on a museum floor, still nursing its permanent wound in the shape of a gaping hole. A posted marker indicates that a German 77mm artillery piece, like one on view, was responsible. Nearby, visitors walk through a man-made crater, standing where a French farmhouse would have been had it not been struck by a 17-inch howitzer shell.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 24, 2006 | By Steven Rea INQUIRER MOVIE CRITIC
If Michael Moore's Fahrenheit 9/11 failed to bridge the ideological chasm between red states and blue, essentially preaching to the choir in its indictment of the Bush administration, Eugene Jarecki's Why We Fight is a far more measured and profoundly scary film. It's impossible to imagine anyone, right-leaning or left, coming away from this hugely important documentary unshaken by its representation of the United States and its military establishment. Using President Dwight D. Eisenhower's famous 1961 farewell address as its centerpiece, Why We Fight is less an exercise in political finger-pointing - or activist filmmaking - than it is a sobering history lesson.
NEWS
February 8, 2005 | By Ken Dilanian INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Down a long, dusty road inside this sprawling former Iraqi military base sit a huge concrete pad and some giant fuel tanks. Next to the pad are a couple of dingy metal trailers. Inside the trailers, the refuelers sit, waiting for the helicopters. When a pair of copters land, two soldiers don radio headsets and run out to fill their tanks. That's what these troops have been doing for the last 11 months, for 12 hours a day, every day - Christmas and New Year's included - with only the occasional day off. "It's been hard, but we keep each other going," said Sgt. Edouardo Thomas, 28, who was born in Haiti.
NEWS
March 7, 2003 | By ELMER SMITH
FIRST TIME I was offered an opportunity to go to war, it didn't seem like that good an idea to me. It was an honor to be asked. But with all the stuff that was vying for my attention at that time, combat experience fell quickly to the bottom of my to-do list. This was in 1965 in a recruiters' office near 52d and Market. Sgt. Brown's list of options included (A) crawling on my belly in a rice paddy 6,000 miles from home while people fired live ammunition at me or (B) being stationed in a Nike missile sight an hour's drive from home on West Chester Pike.
NEWS
September 26, 2002
THE BUSH administration's proposed "pre-emptive attack" on Iraq is both immoral and illegal - just like the tragic events of Sept. 11. The American people are being bamboozled by a man who cheated his way into the White House via a fixed election. This proposed war isn't about national security - it's about oil, keeping the war machine running (remember Eisenhower's warning about the military-industrial complex?) and promoting the right-wing ideology of Bush and his henchmen. I hope it won't take thousands of our sons and daughters coming home in body bags to wake up the American public.
NEWS
September 10, 2002
Continuing debate over U.S. attack on Iraq President Bush and members of his administration tell us that Iraq is about to do us great harm (Inquirer, Sept. 9), and that we must make war to protect ourselves. Society cannot set out to protect itself from what has not yet happened, or future dangers that cannot be measured. There is no end to the dangers we can imagine, thus there would be no end to the preparations. What's even more disturbing is that there is no end to the use those in power can make of our collective insecurity.
NEWS
May 8, 1997 | By David Lee Preston, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER Peter Slevin of the Inquirer Washington Bureau contributed to this article
In a sweeping report on gold and other assets looted by Nazi Germany, the United States yesterday condemned neutral Switzerland for helping Germany bankroll its war machine. It also questioned whether the United States did enough to recover gold and other assets stolen from Holocaust victims and European banks. Some of the plundered gold included jewelry and dental fillings taken from Jews, Gypsies and other concentration-camp prisoners, the report said, and portions were included in assets administered by a commission set up by the Western Allies after World War II. Certain ingots, including dental gold from death-camp inmates, ended up in a pool distributed to European central banks, said the 211-page report, commissioned by President Clinton in October.
NEWS
May 25, 1992 | By Owen Ullmann, INQUIRER WASHINGTON BUREAU
He may have won the Persian Gulf war, but President Bush is coming under political assault for, his detractors say, bungling relations with Iraq before the war and trying to cover up his blunder afterward. A batch of previously secret administration documents made public by a Democratic congressman creates an embarrassing portrait of a president who courted Saddam Hussein before the invasion of Kuwait and ignored multiple warnings that the policy was a big mistake. House Banking Committee Chairman Henry B. Gonzalez, a Texas Democrat, has been trying for nearly two years to publicize the controversy as the biggest scandal of Bush's presidency - "Iraqgate.
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