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NEWS
January 17, 2003 | Daily News Wire Services
The Bush administration responded cautiously yesterday to the discovery in Iraq of empty warheads designed to disperse chemicals. But it insisted Saddam Hussein is in violation of U.N. resolutions regardless of whether the warheads turn out to be the "smoking gun" that so far has eluded U.N. inspectors. White House spokesman Ari Fleischer said the administration was assessing the discovery and would be deliberate about reacting to it. The disclosure could change the dynamic of the debate over Iraq at the United Nations if the discovery represents clear evidence of an Iraqi violation.
NEWS
April 11, 2010 | By Faye Flam INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Physicist Bruce Goodwin compares our nuclear weapons to vintage cars: 20 to 40 years old and subject to corrosion. They weren't designed to last forever. At some point, they may no longer work. Scientists can't assess the stockpile by exploding a few warheads; nuclear testing would violate U.S. policy in place since 1992. Solving this conundrum falls to the national weapons labs, including Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, where Goodwin heads up weapons research. Livermore's approach involves a combination of supercomputer simulations and experiments, the most ambitious of which will use a $5 billion laser apparatus in an attempt to create a controlled version of an exploding hydrogen bomb.
NEWS
January 9, 2002 | By Warren P. Strobel INQUIRER WASHINGTON BUREAU
Thousands of nuclear warheads that President Bush plans to take out of operation in a disarmament agreement with Russia may be put into storage for possible later use rather than destroyed, according to a classified Pentagon nuclear-weapons plan presented to Congress yesterday. The plan, described by U.S. officials who were briefed on its contents, appears to raise new questions about the finality of Bush's pledge to cut the U.S. nuclear arsenal to between 1,700 and 2,200 warheads from its current level of almost 6,000.
NEWS
June 3, 2013 | ASSOCIATED PRESS
STOCKHOLM - China, India and Pakistan have increased their nuclear weapons by about 10 warheads each in the past year, and other nuclear states appear set on maintaining their arsenals, a Swedish think tank said today. At the start of the year, China had raised its number of nuclear warheads to 250 from 240 in 2012 as part of a process to modernize its defense, the Stockholm International Peace Research Institute said. However it also said China is "highly nontransparent" when it comes to its nuclear arsenal.
NEWS
December 9, 1987 | By James McCartney, Inquirer Washington Bureau
As President Reagan and Soviet leader Mikhail S. Gorbachev got down to business in their summit talks, their top objective was not to solve differences over "Star Wars" or Afghanistan. Instead, it was to narrow differences in the search for massive reductions in strategic arms. The Soviets apparently have decided that disputes over Star Wars can be delayed for at least a year while the two countries concentrate on slashing strategic nuclear arsenals by roughly 50 percent. And that means the key issues at the summit, and the final measure of its success, lie in how far they get in facing the arcane issue of nuclear "sub- limits" - the limits placed on specific classes of weapons within the strategic arsenals of each country.
NEWS
June 21, 2002 | By Jonathan S. Landay INQUIRER WASHINGTON BUREAU
With the ink barely dry on last month's nuclear-arms-reduction pact with Russia, the Bush administration is eager to explore new uses and improved designs for the country's ultimate weapons. Administration officials worry that existing warheads cannot destroy targets such as deeply buried bunkers in Iraq, Iran and North Korea that may house biological or chemical weapons. The Energy Department, caretaker of the U.S. nuclear arsenal, wants teams of experts to study whether they could modify existing warheads for these kinds of targets.
NEWS
January 31, 1992 | By Thomas Ginsberg, ASSOCIATED PRESS Inquirer staff writer Stephen Seplow contributed to this article
President Boris N. Yeltsin may urge still deeper cuts in nuclear arsenals during his meeting with President Bush, Russian officials said yesterday. "The policies of Russia in arms reduction and disarmament will be an active policy. I would even call it 'offensive,' " Alexander Obukhov, a senior arms-control official, said during a news conference. Yeltsin, in a sweeping disarmament package announced Wednesday, said Russia was cutting defense spending by 10 percent and halting production of heavy bombers, air- and sea-based cruise missiles, and warheads for land-based tactical missiles.
NEWS
May 24, 2002 | By Jonathan S. Landay INQUIRER WASHINGTON BUREAU
The treaty that President Bush and Russian President Vladimir V. Putin will sign today in Moscow is being billed as an arms-control breakthrough, but it actually imposes no constraints on the sizes of the U.S. and Russian nuclear forces. The decade-long accord limits only the numbers of long-range nuclear warheads that are deployed, or ready for use, by both sides by 2012. The agreement allows Russia and the United States to store as many warheads as they want. It does not require them to destroy bombers, missiles and submarines removed from nuclear service, and it permits them to re-arm those systems with stored warheads by withdrawing from the treaty with a three-month notice.
NEWS
October 10, 1986 | By ALTON FRYE, From the New York Times
We are about to learn whether President Reagan and Soviet leader Mikhail S. Gorbachev are statesmen or merely politicians grasping for advantage. Reykjavik and the summit meetings that may follow will test their capacity to frame a shared vision for future U.S.-Soviet relations. From all signs, they are already in reach of a valuable interim agreement reducing intermediate nuclear forces. More significantly, three other agreements to reinforce strategic restraint are ripe for decision.
NEWS
July 19, 2011
Old warheads stolen on train BUCHAREST, Romania - Dozens of small, old rocket warheads were stolen from a train carrying military equipment from Romania to Bulgaria, officials said Monday. Authorities insisted the 64 warheads posed no danger to the public but offered varying explanations why. The Romanian national police said there was no risk because they were not attached to rockets. Spokesman Florin Hulea declined to provide further details. Bulgaria's Economy Ministry said the warheads belonged to 122mm diameter Grad rockets, which are typically fired from vehicle-mounted multiple-rocket launchers.
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NEWS
June 20, 2013 | By Scott Wilson, Washington Post
BERLIN - President Obama on Wednesday called for reducing the number of deployed U.S. strategic nuclear warheads by one-third if the Russian government agrees to a similar cut, reviving a goal outlined early in his presidency to work toward a world without nuclear weapons. Obama's proposal, which met with a cool reception in Moscow, came during a much-anticipated speech here that sought to shake Western nations from complacency that he said has taken hold since the end of the Cold War. Speaking at the Brandenburg Gate, a historic backdrop for U.S. presidents, Obama said the dissolution of the Soviet Union has brought "a sense that the great challenges have somehow passed.
NEWS
June 3, 2013 | ASSOCIATED PRESS
STOCKHOLM - China, India and Pakistan have increased their nuclear weapons by about 10 warheads each in the past year, and other nuclear states appear set on maintaining their arsenals, a Swedish think tank said today. At the start of the year, China had raised its number of nuclear warheads to 250 from 240 in 2012 as part of a process to modernize its defense, the Stockholm International Peace Research Institute said. However it also said China is "highly nontransparent" when it comes to its nuclear arsenal.
NEWS
April 13, 2013 | By Ernesto Londoño, Washington Post
WASHINGTON - North Korea likely has a nuclear warhead small enough to fit on a ballistic missile, according to a new assessment by the Pentagon's intelligence arm that comes amid growing alarm over Pyongyang's warmongering. The conclusion by the Defense Intelligence Agency said the weapon would have "low reliability," but the disclosure during a congressional hearing Thursday is likely to raise fresh concerns about North Korea's capabilities and intentions. Rep. Doug Lamborn (R., Colo.)
NEWS
January 11, 2013 | By David E. Hoffman
In a nuclear crisis, the United States' secret war plan calls for the president to decide in just 13 minutes what he should do in the event of a serious warning of missile attack. That's right: 13 minutes to decide the fate of the world. President Obama has the power to change that in his second term - and live up to a campaign promise he made, by the way, back in 2008. It won't be as simple as a pen stroke, but with some creative thinking and deft diplomacy, Obama could make the world much, much safer by eliminating this Cold War hangover.
NEWS
February 19, 2012 | By George Jahn, Associated Press
VIENNA, Austria - Iran is poised to greatly expand uranium enrichment at a fortified underground bunker to a point that would boost how quickly it could make nuclear warheads, diplomats have told the Associated Press. They said that Tehran has put finishing touches for the installation of thousands of new-generation centrifuges at the cavernous facility - machines that can produce enriched uranium much more quickly and efficiently than its present machines. While saying that the electrical circuitry, piping and supporting equipment for the new centrifuges was now in place, the diplomats emphasized that Tehran had not started installing the new machines at its Fordo facility and could not say whether it was planning to. Still, the senior diplomats - who asked for anonymity because their information was privileged - suggested that Tehran would have little reason to prepare the ground for the better centrifuges unless it planned to operate them.
NEWS
July 19, 2011
Old warheads stolen on train BUCHAREST, Romania - Dozens of small, old rocket warheads were stolen from a train carrying military equipment from Romania to Bulgaria, officials said Monday. Authorities insisted the 64 warheads posed no danger to the public but offered varying explanations why. The Romanian national police said there was no risk because they were not attached to rockets. Spokesman Florin Hulea declined to provide further details. Bulgaria's Economy Ministry said the warheads belonged to 122mm diameter Grad rockets, which are typically fired from vehicle-mounted multiple-rocket launchers.
NEWS
April 11, 2010 | By Faye Flam INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Physicist Bruce Goodwin compares our nuclear weapons to vintage cars: 20 to 40 years old and subject to corrosion. They weren't designed to last forever. At some point, they may no longer work. Scientists can't assess the stockpile by exploding a few warheads; nuclear testing would violate U.S. policy in place since 1992. Solving this conundrum falls to the national weapons labs, including Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, where Goodwin heads up weapons research. Livermore's approach involves a combination of supercomputer simulations and experiments, the most ambitious of which will use a $5 billion laser apparatus in an attempt to create a controlled version of an exploding hydrogen bomb.
NEWS
February 6, 2006
Mourns Strawbridge's I do not know where your reporter found his "shoppers on the street," because everyone I have talked to, both friends and strangers, is mourning the passing of Strawbridge's (Strawbridge's countdown: Many sales, few regrets," Jan. 31). I have been shopping there for more than 50 years. Back before malls dotted the landscape, we would travel into "the city" and shop at Lits, Gimbels, Strawbridge & Clothier and Wanamakers. Strawbridge's always offered the best merchandise at the best prices.
NEWS
September 17, 2003 | By Sumana Chatterjee INQUIRER WASHINGTON BUREAU
Senate Republicans yesterday defeated an effort to block the Bush administration from making mini-nuclear weapons for battlefield use and resuming underground nuclear tests. The largely party-line vote, 53-41, killed a measure sponsored by Democratic Sens. Edward M. Kennedy of Massachusetts and Dianne Feinstein of California. The measure was similar to legislation that the Republican-led House endorsed in June despite White House objections. The administration worries that conventional warheads will not destroy deeply buried chemical, biological or nuclear arsenals.
NEWS
April 6, 2003 | By Andrea Gerlin, Peter Smolowitz and Steven Thomma INQUIRER WASHINGTON BUREAU
U.S. tanks rolled briefly into Baghdad yesterday, flaunting America's military power and impressing the capital's five million residents that the city was no longer fully under Saddam Hussein's control. To the southeast, meanwhile, Marines discovered at least two caches of military warheads that were being tested as possible chemical or biological weapons. The warheads were found in Aziziyah, about 55 miles from Baghdad. An initial field test "confirmed" the presence of anthrax, according to a Marine radio operator in touch with the analysis team.
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