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Warlords

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NEWS
April 29, 2002 | Daily News wire services
Bitter feuding among warlords turned eastern Afghanistan into a war zone this weekend, leaving as many as 25 dead and furious residents accusing the interim regime of being weak, and the United States of being uncaring. Some say they are even praying for a return of the Taliban, whose heavy-handed rule sent most of the country's warlords into exile. Yesterday, residents in Gardez began to emerge from shuttered dwellings to bury their dead killed in the previous day's rocket assault.
NEWS
June 18, 2006 | By Hannah Allam INQUIRER FOREIGN STAFF
In early March, nine of Mogadishu's most prominent community leaders secretly flew to neighboring Djibouti and pleaded with U.S. military officials there to stop funding the warlords who were devastating the city. Backing the warlords, they said, would end up strengthening an Islamist militia with a shadowy radical wing. The Americans ignored their warnings, three of the Somalis at the meeting said in separate interviews, and the community leaders' fears came to life this month when the Islamic Courts Union militia defeated the warlords and took control of the Somali capital.
NEWS
April 30, 2002 | Daily News wire services
Flushing out Taliban warriors is a difficult task, but U.S. special forces are putting a dent in their weapons supplies. Just last week, a U.S. convoy roared into this village in eastern Afghanistan, searched two houses, dug up a garden and found three truckloads of weapons and ammo left by the Taliban. The munitions had been there since just after the Sept. 11 terror attacks in the United States. Taliban commander Jalaluddin Haqqani came to Talak, 12 miles north of Khost, with the cache of weapons and handed it over to his trusted commander, Alef Khan, said Khan's cousin.
NEWS
December 22, 1992 | By Carol Morello, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Somalia's two most powerful rival warlords yesterday started to withdraw their armed vehicles known as technicals from the capital and sideline them in rural compounds. Under an agreement brokered by the U.S. military, Gen. Mohamed Farrah Aidid pulled his technicals northwest of Mogadishu yesterday, and Ali Mahdi Mohamed will remove his technicals today to the northeast. Aidid is a far more powerful leader than his former ally, Ali Mahdi, who controls only a small coastal sliver of turf north of Mogadishu.
NEWS
March 5, 1995 | Knight-Ridder Tribune / RICARDO MAZALAN
U.S. Marines in Somalia filed into an amphibious vehicle last week as they and other U.N. peacekeeping forces ended a two-year intervention. The mission fed thousands of starving Somalis but was unable to bring stability to the nation. The warlords who were in place before the intervention were there when it ended.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 16, 2010 | By Steven Rea INQUIRER MOVIE CRITIC
The grunting, glorious battle scenes in the 19th-century China fightfest The Warlords go on and on, but the moment that may take the proverbial cake is when Jet Li, as a renegade general, finds himself encircled by a troop of blade-slinging enemy soldiers. The Asian action star takes his long spear and swiftly runs it low through the calves of the surrounding throng. Defeat takes on a new meaning - and a new spelling - for the instantly amputated men. Directed in thumping, thundering fashion by Peter Ho-Sun Chan, The Warlords, with Takeshi Kaneshiro and Andy Lau fighting alongside Li, is the latest in a line of historical war epics (see Red Cliff, also with Kaneshiro)
NEWS
December 3, 1992 | By SAID S. SAMATAR
The Bush administration's offer to send up to 30,000 military personnel to Somalia as part of a U.N. effort to ensure safe delivery of humanitarian aid has the elements of a creative bluff. It is a bluff because Bush and his advisers surely know that there is no need to deploy that many troops in Somalia; as few as 5,000 could do the job. It is creative in that it signals to warlords and others that the United States finally means business in Somalia. The mere talk of U.S. troop deployment has already prompted Gen. Mohammed Faarah Aidiid, strongest of the warlords, to pledge cooperation.
NEWS
December 4, 2001 | By Crispin Sartwell
We are obligated to occupy Afghanistan. The people we are supporting, the Northern Alliance, are corrupt, rapacious and murderous. Many of their members are past-and-present warlords who have kept Afghanistan in chaos for years. (When I write warlords below, think Northern Alliance.) Northern Alliance forces have been responsible for several horrendous massacres, including the slaughter of hundreds of Taliban sympathizers (subsequently buried in mass graves) in Mazar-e-Sharif in 1997.
NEWS
August 16, 2004
Regional militias and well-armed warlords are a hazard for countries struggling to be democracies. That truism ought to be deeply entrenched by now in the policies and minds of U.S. officials grappling with stabilizing Iraq and Afghanistan. The two countries, whose former regimes the United States military easily toppled, have different circumstances. But they share at least one obstacle to progress: the strength of extra-governmental regional forces that the United States has bolstered.
NEWS
June 17, 2006 | By Andrew Maykuth INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Somalia's Islamic Courts Union may represent a seismic shift toward a totalitarian religious state, or it could be merely the latest adjustment in Somalia's murky, clan-based political scene. Experts on the Horn of Africa nation disagree about the implications of the union, a coalition of Islamic militias that this week expanded its hold on southern Somalia after ousting U.S.-backed warlords from Mogadishu. The Islamic councils govern the religious affairs of various Somalian clans.
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NEWS
July 15, 2012 | By Deb Riechmann and Rahim Faiez, Associated Press
KABUL, Afghanistan - A suicide bomber blew himself up among guests at a wedding hall Saturday in northern Afghanistan, killing 23 people, including a prominent ex-Uzbek warlord turned lawmaker who was the father of the bride. The attack was the latest to target top figures from the country's minority groups and dealt a blow to efforts to unify ethnic factions amid growing concerns that the country could descend into civil war after foreign combat troops withdraw in 2014. Ahmad Khan Samangani, an ethnic Uzbek who commanded forces fighting the Soviets in the 1980s and later became a member of parliament, was welcoming guests to his daughter's wedding Saturday morning when the blast ripped through the building in Aybak, the capital of Samangan province.
NEWS
April 29, 2012 | By Rodney Muhumuza, Associated Press
RIVER VOVODO, Central African Republic - For Ugandan soldiers tasked with catching Joseph Kony, the real threat is not the elusive Central Africa warlord and his brutal gang. Encounters with the Lord's Resistance Army rebels are so rare that Kony hunters worry more about the threats of the jungle: armed poachers, wild beasts, honey bees, and even a fly that torments their ears. A soldier crossing the Chinko river in the Central African Republic this month was drowned and mauled by a crocodile, spreading terror among hundreds of soldiers who must camp near streams because they need water to cook food.
NEWS
April 6, 2012 | By Julie Watson, Associated Press
SAN DIEGO - A wildly popular Internet video turned African warlord Joseph Kony into a household name and boosted the international hunt for the brutal rebel leader. Can a sequel do more? That's the burning question for the small California advocacy group Invisible Children and its follow-up, Kony 2012 Part II . The Associated Press was given a copy of the sequel before its Thursday release. Part II repeats some of the same slick, inspiring shots as the original of a young global community mobilizing into action.
NEWS
March 15, 2012 | By Mike Corder, Associated Press
THE HAGUE, Netherlands - The International Criminal Court convicted a Congolese warlord Wednesday of using child soldiers, a verdict hailed as a legal landmark in the fight against impunity for the world's most serious crimes. Human-rights advocates said the guilty verdicts against Thomas Lubanga - the first judgment in the court's 10-year history - should stand as a clear deterrent to armies around the world not to conscript children. "In this age of global media, today's verdict will reach warlords and commanders across the world and serve as a strong deterrent," the United Nations' special representative for children and armed conflict, Radhika Coomaraswamy, said in a statement.
NEWS
July 29, 2011 | By Trudy Rubin, Inquirer Columnist
His family begged him to leave. His son-in-law told him he was crazy to stay. But when I interviewed the feisty, gray-haired, Afghan American mayor of Kandahar, Ghulam Haider Hamidi, he brushed aside any idea of leaving. On Wednesday, Hamidi was killed by a suicide bomber who hid explosives in his turban. His death, the latest in a string of assassinations of key Kandahar officials, deals a further blow to American efforts to stabilize southern Afghanistan. Indeed, Hamidi's life and death reflect the sad mismatch between America's efforts and reality there.
NEWS
April 29, 2011 | By Michelle Faul and Serme Lassina, Associated Press
ABIDJAN, Ivory Coast - Renegade warlord Ibrahim "IB" Coulibaly was badly beaten and then shot in the heart by former allies turned enemy, his top aide said late Thursday to deny a claim that the two-time coup plotter had committed suicide. Ivory Coast President Alassane Ouattara, whom Coulibaly had said he considered "a father," earlier Thursday expressed his regrets at the death of his wife's onetime bodyguard, who began the pro-democracy battle for Abidjan that put Ouattara in power.
NEWS
April 21, 2011 | By Michelle Faul, Associated Press
ABIDJAN, Ivory Coast - Nine days after forces loyal to the internationally recognized new leader ended former President Laurent Gbagbo's defiant hold on power, the country's commercial capital was rocked by new fighting, trapping civilians. In the Abidjan suburb of Yopougon, Gbagbo diehards battled the forces of new President Alassane Ouattara. In suburban Abobo, clashes broke out between the forces of two warlords, both pledging loyalty to Ouattara. The violence Wednesday was a major setback as the country was beginning to return to normal.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 11, 2010 | By JEROME MAIDA, For the Daily News
Dynamite is starting to make magnificence monotonous. The company has again taken an aged, beloved property which hasn't been seen in any medium for awhile, kept the essential elements that made it stand the test of time while expanding the story to include elements that will make it more contemporary and compelling. Shake, stir and voila! There's another . . . ahem . . . Dynamite book on the shelves, in this case "Warlord of Mars," the first issue of which just hit comic shops at the extremely affordable price of one dollar - the best value of the month.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 16, 2010 | By Steven Rea INQUIRER MOVIE CRITIC
The grunting, glorious battle scenes in the 19th-century China fightfest The Warlords go on and on, but the moment that may take the proverbial cake is when Jet Li, as a renegade general, finds himself encircled by a troop of blade-slinging enemy soldiers. The Asian action star takes his long spear and swiftly runs it low through the calves of the surrounding throng. Defeat takes on a new meaning - and a new spelling - for the instantly amputated men. Directed in thumping, thundering fashion by Peter Ho-Sun Chan, The Warlords, with Takeshi Kaneshiro and Andy Lau fighting alongside Li, is the latest in a line of historical war epics (see Red Cliff, also with Kaneshiro)
ENTERTAINMENT
August 1, 2008 | By Nick Cristiano INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
As front man for the Clash, Joe Strummer was one of the most compelling and charismatic figures in rock. The Clash sprang from London's punk scene in the mid-'70s, but the band's monumental legacy stems from the way it transcended those origins, spurning nihilism for idealism and embracing a broad array of musical styles. And Strummer, the self-styled "punk-rock warlord," was the driving force behind it all. Julien Temple's The Future Is Unwritten is a moving portrait of the man born John Graham Mellor, who died at 50 in 2002 of an undetected heart defect.
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