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ENTERTAINMENT
January 17, 2008 | By Jim Coleman and Candace Hagen
Q: How do you keep lobster tails as tender as they are at a restaurant? No matter whether I boil or broil them, invariably the skin ends up tough. I don't think I'm overcooking them - usually about 15 minutes for a 10- to 12-ounce tail. What's the secret? Thanks. - Stephanie B. A: I'm sure that with what you are paying for 10- to 12-ounce lobster tails, you want Elvis himself to be serenading you with "Love me tender, love me sweet. " Believe it or not, the key really may be in what you are paying.
NEWS
August 14, 1998 | by Rob Lamon, For the Daily News
Debbie Morkevich has hated jellyfish since one almost ate through her swimsuit. After swimming in the ocean several years ago, Morkevich, of Northfield, N.J., got all the way home to her shower before finding the jellyfish in her suit. "It didn't hurt my skin but it ate through the material," Morkevich said. "I am deathly afraid of jellyfish now. " So Morkevich did not go to the beach last weekend as usual. And she might not go this week, if the jellyfish are still around.
LIVING
December 9, 2005 | By Alan J. Heavens INQUIRER REAL ESTATE WRITER
Question: I would like to remove wallpaper that was put on about 15 years ago in one of my bathrooms. Is there an easy and safe way to remove it? What should I buy? Will there be any strong fumes from what I would be using? Answer: Vinegar in warm water still works best. And it would be a good thing if the person who put the wallpaper on in the first place sized the wall beforehand - a process that creates a barrier between the wall material and back of the wallpaper, so that only the paper (and not the wall)
NEWS
August 20, 2008 | By Amy S. Rosenberg INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
To those who took their Jersey Shore vacation during the first 11 weeks of the season, when the ocean had that ice-cubes-in-water, ankle-numbing chill to it, Jan Nossbaum of Maple Glen has a message for you. "The water is beautiful, warm," Nossbaum said, settling into the beach at Washington Avenue in Margate yesterday just before noon, with the ocean temp about 72 degrees. "And it's crystal clear. Mayah [her 6-year-old daughter] was in for an hour and a half. It's the first time she's gone all the way in. " Yes, with about two weeks of bearable temperatures under its belt (let's define bearable as 68 degrees and higher)
FOOD
March 28, 1990 | By Polly Fisher, Special to the Daily News
Dear Polly: Can poultry dishes be left to marinate at room temperature for an hour or two? - Ann Dear Ann: No meat should be left at room temperature, even when soaking in an acidic marinade (which can slow some, but not necessarily all, bacterial development). It's just not safe. Many bacteria develop and grow at room temperature, including salmonella, which can be present in poultry. Some old recipes and foreign recipes specify marinating at room temperature because the marinade penetrates the food faster than when refrigerated, but I don't think it's worth the risk.
NEWS
April 20, 1989 | By Kristin E. Holmes, Inquirer Staff Writer
There is a chance that students who have been unable to use North Penn High School's racing and diving pools because of problems stemming from asbestos removal will be able to plunge into those familiar waters before the end of the school year. The possibility that the pools would reopen was discussed by George P. Starkey, district business manager, after a school board meeting Tuesday. Cracks were discovered in both pools in February after asbestos was removed from the ceiling above them.
FOOD
April 9, 1986 | By POLLY FISHER, Special to the Daily News
Dear Polly: Before I clean my wedding and engagement rings, each has diamond settings, I always slip them on a large safety pin. Then I put them in a small sauce dish filled with warm water, a little detergent or liquid soap and a few drops of ammonia and let them soak for about five minutes. I brush them gently with an old toothbrush and rinse in warm water with a few more drops of ammonia. I dry them with a tissue. The rings really sparkle after this treatment. The safety pin makes it easier to hold on in case you happen to drop them, which is easily done when they are soapy and wet. Other rings with settings can be cleaned at the same time.
FOOD
January 11, 1989 | By Polly Fisher, Special to the Daily News
Dear Polly: I'm having difficulty getting combs and brushes clean. Can you help? - Garry Dear Garry: Frequent washing makes the job easier, since oil, dust and dirt don't have time to build up. However, if you have a comb or brush that's tough to clean, try soaking it in warm water to which you've added a few drops of household ammonia. Ammonia dissolves grease and should soak those combs and brushes clean. A brief brushing with an old toothbrush is an excellent way to dislodge any remaining dirt and make those implements sparkle before a final rinse in clear water.
NEWS
August 28, 2005 | By Jacqueline L. Urgo INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Looking out across the narrow wooden dock running along the breezy Intracoastal Waterway, Eric Stauffer found himself at a loss for explanation. "I've never caught anything before; I can't believe it," said Stauffer, 37, of Mount Laurel, shaking a plastic bucket in which about four dozen blue crabs were piled upon one another, fighting to get to the top. The feistiest seemed to be charting the quickest course back into the water, instead of the pot to which they were headed.
NEWS
August 26, 1997 | By Marguerite Holloway
It is hard to make sense of El Nino. It is perhaps the world's only regular meteorological event, yet it manages to cause great surprise every time it reappears - as it has, just recently, in the Pacific Ocean. Sweeping warm water toward the West Coast, this year's El Nino promises to deliver, from California to the East Coast, a devastating winter of storms - or perhaps a drought. It's hard to know which. El Nino works in seemingly paradoxical ways. Every few years, for some mysterious reason, the trade winds in the equatorial Pacific weaken.
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NEWS
September 9, 2015 | By Suzette Parmley, Inquirer Staff Writer
ATLANTIC CITY - Summer ended with a splash here on Labor Day, with packed casino pools, a full beach, and a busy Boardwalk on a perfectly sunny day - giving the struggling resort one more weekend of reprieve before another nearly deserted offseason. It was just as glorious an ending for the Shore in general, capped with a tribute to Philadelphia-bred music legend Chubby Checker in Wildwood, where he first performed "The Twist" live at the Rainbow Club in 1960. From Cape May to Long Beach Island, tourism officials raved about the great weather and the warmer water that helped boost visitation over last year.
NEWS
January 18, 2013
ON A slate-gray Sunday afternoon, soundtracked by the low-volume televisual hum of cutthroat playoff football, Lucio Palazzo knows he's struck the kitchen version of pay dirt. Pacing between the dining room and stove of his deep-in-South-Philly home, he declares as much to the eaters in earshot between enthusiastic mouthfuls. "This is definitely a situation. " After a few good-not-great results, the chef is rejoicing over a tremendous taco, but it's nothing like the tortillas he painstakingly plates up at his workplace.
NEWS
November 5, 2012 | By Anthony R. Wood, Inquirer Staff Writer
Having transformed New Jersey's barrier islands into sand traps, humbled New York City, and darkened millions of households in a bustling population corridor, Sandy has set off new waves of anxiety about the state of the atmosphere. Coming after yet another blistering summer, a renege "derecho" wind storm in June, record wildfires, and a hyperactive hurricane season, it is not surprising that Sandy has people asking: Is this the latest creation of an overheated atmosphere running amok?
NEWS
August 23, 2010
The dramatic - and undoubtedly smelly - fish kill on Delaware Bay this month wasn't an effect of the Gulf of Mexico oil spill, as some readers posited. Or a sign of cataclysmic climate change. The deaths of thousands of menhaden that washed onto the bayshore of Cape May County were most likely the unfortunate result of steady winds, ocean movements, and even the science of flat soda pop. When the fish kill happened on Aug. 11, conditions were unusual but not unexpected, said University of Delaware oceanographer Matt Oliver, who's part of a group that monitors ocean conditions.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 11, 2010
to burn off any food. Then turn off the heat and immediately scrub the grates again. Check drip pans. Empty and clean the large one that catches food monthly if you grill often (wear rubber gloves and wash with a scrubbing sponge and dishwashing liquid). The smaller, disposable one below it catches grease. Replace it with a new aluminum pan when it is half full. Just before grilling season, do a more thorough cleaning. Turn the burners on high, close the lid and let the grill run for 20 to 40 minutes, depending on how dirty it is. Turn the burners off when the residue has burned down to a white-gray ash that can be brushed away easily.
NEWS
May 31, 2010 | By Anthony R. Wood INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
On the threshold of summer, the record winter may have evaporated from the Philadelphia region's memory but not from the atmosphere's. Experts warn that winter's mischief has left the Atlantic Ocean in a dangerously warm state, and that the next few months may be stormy, destructive, and costly along the Atlantic and oil-blighted Gulf Coasts. It also may be quite hot around here. Some forecasters think that as summer ripens, nature will turn up the heat in the East with considerably more vigor than last year, and the state of the ocean might make hot spells more oppressive.
NEWS
May 31, 2010 | By Anthony R. Wood, Inquirer Staff Writer
On the threshold of summer, the record winter may have evaporated from the Philadelphia region's memory but not from the atmosphere's. Experts warn that winter's mischief has left the Atlantic Ocean in a dangerously warm state, and that the next few months may be stormy, destructive, and costly along the Atlantic and oil-blighted Gulf Coasts. It also may be quite hot around here. Some forecasters think that as summer ripens, nature will turn up the heat in the East with considerably more vigor than last year, and the state of the ocean might make hot spells more oppressive.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 21, 2010
MANY conventional cleaning products don't just remove dirt. They also leave behind chemicals that can be dangerous to breathe or touch, and which can contaminate soil and water once washed down the drain. For a less-toxic alternative, take an old-fashioned approach to cleaning: Use gentle soaps and basic kitchen staples, such as baking soda and white vinegar. You'll have a fresh, clean house - and save money while you're at it. DIY cleaners Consider your idea of what "clean" means.
NEWS
April 22, 2010 | By Sandy Bauers INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Forty years ago, throngs of flower children frolicked in Fairmount Park, playing kazoos and tossing streamers. Ira Einhorn, the city's self-styled hippie guru who later gained notoriety for murdering his girlfriend, hogged the stage, and poet Allen Ginsberg chanted, "Merrily, merrily, we welcome, we welcome the end of the earth. " The first Earth Day was a party, a polemic, a protest. This year, Earth Day has no regional signature event. Instead, Earth Day seems to have become such a part of our DNA that it's happening everywhere.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 25, 2010
For a recipe that doesn't have a lot of ingredients, there are many variations when it comes to making matzo balls. Here are several to choose from, including one right from the Manischewitz Matzo Meal box. All are served in chicken soup, preferably homemade, so there's a recipe for that, too. Figure on two matzo balls per person served with soup as a first course. Let's begin with a traditional recipe from 1941's "Jewish Home Beautiful," by Betty D. Greenberg and Althea O. Silverman, published by the Women's League of the United Synagogue of America.
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