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Warning Signs

NEWS
July 15, 1987 | By CYNTHIA BURTON, Daily News Staff Writer
The Goode administration may have ignored yet another early warning sign that all was not well with the MOVE reconstruction project. After four separate insurance-bond brokers turned down MOVE builder Ernest A. Edwards Jr.'s Premier Construction Co., Goode asked George Holbrook, president of Reliance Surety Co., to give Edwards a bond, Holbrook testified at Edwards' preliminary hearing yesterday. Edwards needed a bond that would guarantee his work in rebuilding the 61 West Philadelphia houses destroyed in a fire after the city dropped a bomb on MOVE's Osage Avenue headquarters May 13, 1985, killing 11 people.
NEWS
June 24, 1999 | by Earni Young, Daily News Staff Writer
Residents living near the sinking homes in Wissinoming say the rowhouses showed visible signs of settling long before the rapid deterioration of the past three years. Yet, families who bought the homes in that period were able to obtain mortgages. Something that should not have happened if an alert appraiser had noted the settlement and recommended further investigation before the loans were approved. According to Harry Marder, president of the American Society of Appraisers, such vigilance is not always rewarded.
NEWS
May 23, 2011 | By PHIL GOLDSMITH
WHEN school-district bigwigs appear before City Council tomorrow with cup in hand to present their $629 million-gap budget that threatens to put thousands of teachers and staff on unemployment, cancel full-day kindergarten, eliminate transportation and cut a host of other programs, I have no doubt the theme will be district as victim. It's not our fault, officials will say. The federal stimulus program has ended, and Gov. Corbett has slashed funding for education. In short, the devil made us do it. But let's remember that district officials knew for three years that the stimulus money was coming to an end, and they've known the new governor would have a mounting state deficit to deal with.
LIVING
September 19, 1995 | By Shankar Vedantam, INQUIRER WASHINGTON BUREAU
The only good news about violence in the workplace may be that you can usually see it coming. Psychologists and crisis specialists say more than 99 percent of the workplace homicides last year that involved coworkers or estranged personal relationships had telltale signs that could have tipped off alert observers. "The perpetrator always gives you an indicator," said John Nicoletti, a police psychologist and crisis consultant in Lakewood, Colo. "The typical public belief is that these people just snap; that just isn't true.
NEWS
December 25, 1987 | By Linda Loyd, Inquirer Staff Writer
For the nation's nonprofit institutions that depend on charitable donations, this could have been the year that Scrooge put a squeeze on the spirit of giving. First, on Jan. 1, came the new federal tax law, which whacked away at tax incentives for charitable donations. Then on Oct. 19 came the stock market crash. Although fund-raisers are still nervously awaiting the final tally after Dec. 31, so far their worst fears have gone unfounded. "We have a pretty good indication that tax reform didn't have a great impact on giving," said John N. Bailey, president of the American Association of Fund-Raising Counsel in New York.
NEWS
July 21, 2013
Q: I'm a teen and while playing basketball I felt sharp pains in my scrotum that wouldn't go away. What could it be?   A: Spermatic cord torsion is usually an abrupt event. The key warning sign is sudden, severe testicular pain, followed by swelling and hardening of the testicle. Many patients also have groin or abdominal pain, nausea, and even vomiting. The risk is greatest in the 10-to-18- year age group, but it can occur at any age. In this dangerous condition, the spermatic cord, or the tissue carrying the blood supply to the testicle, twists, cutting off the blood supply and causing severe damage or death of the testicle.
NEWS
February 10, 2014 | By Susan Snyder, Inquirer Staff Writer
Christopher Aiello broke into tears - again - when he got a call last month about Madison Holleran, a promising scholar-athlete at the University of Pennsylvania who jumped to her death from a Center City parking garage, stunning her family, friends, and campus community. The call came from a friend, who in an eerie coincidence, knew Holleran's father. Aiello lost his own daughter, Paige, the same way nine months earlier. Tennis team captain and an A student at the College of New Jersey, she was weeks shy of graduation and had been accepted to nine law schools when her body was recovered from the Hudson River.
NEWS
July 8, 2003 | By Terry Bitman and Edward Colimore INQUIRER STAFF WRITERS
New Jersey requires all public school districts to have plans to deal with troubled students who pose a threat of violence. "This is not just reactionary," said Susan Martz, director of the state Education Department's office of program support services. "We are proposing they have a comprehensive program that includes intervention and referral. " Such policies have been put in place in states across the nation since 15 people died in the attack at Columbine High School in Colorado in 1999.
NEWS
April 29, 2004 | By Mitch Lipka INQUIRER TRENTON BUREAU
With four of 13 suspected child-abuse and neglect deaths in New Jersey this year attributed to boyfriends of the children's mothers, the state is making so-called paramour cases a higher priority. The four deaths this year surpass the three in 2002 and 2003 combined, Human Services Commissioner James Davy said yesterday as he announced that such cases would be considered "high risk. " Citing some questionable judgments made by Department of Youth and Family Services workers in at least one of the cases, Davy said a policy being drafted by DYFS Director Edward Cotton would help ensure that warning signs are not missed.
NEWS
December 12, 1993 | By William Hamilton, WASHINGTON POST
The descriptions almost always are the same, sometimes eerily echoing one another. About the time that acquaintances of Colin Ferguson in Long Beach, Calif., were telling reporters that he was "a cool guy," although apparently unhappy that he could not find work, 450 mourners were filling a church in Ventura, 80 miles away. They heard Alan Winterbourne's family describe him as a caring person whose frustration at being unemployed they never understood. Ferguson, 35, is accused of shooting 23 people on a Long Island train Tuesday night.
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