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Warning System

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NEWS
September 15, 1988 | By Cynthia Mayer, Inquirer Staff Writer
Worried over the possibility of a chemical leak from the railroad cars that regularly pass through its back yard, Eddystone Borough this week put the finishing touches on a new warning system designed to alert residents to hazardous-materials emergencies. The centerpiece of the system is an air horn installed near Pennsylvania Shipbuilding Co. In case of a toxic leak or hazardous-materials spill, the Fire Department will sound the horn in five sets of three blasts, and then begin broadcasting instructions over KYW-AM (1060)
NEWS
February 28, 1995 | by Ramona Smith, Daily News Staff Writer
It's 3 a.m., the neighborhood is sleeping - and some evil chemical genie bursts out of its bottle. How would you find out? If you don't happen to be up - and listening to the Emergency Broadcast System - police or fire sirens may be your first alarm. Now Philadelphia emergency planners are talking about a citywide telephone alert system that could warn residents of an emergency, night or day. Community groups near the South Philadelphia refinery complex have called for an alert system similar to the telephone alert system and factory sirens already in place in Bridesburg.
NEWS
March 14, 2002
Resist the temptation for cheap jokes: Who said Tom Ridge isn't a colorful guy! In this dangerous new world, where terrorism could come from anywhere, anytime, Homeland Security Director Ridge's color-coded terrorism warning system may be far from perfect. But it's a rational, organized response to unpredictable mayhem - an improvement over vague terrorism "alerts" that mainly left the public and local law enforcement agencies confused. Ripples from the new alert codes should lead to improved security systems throughout the public and private sectors.
NEWS
May 31, 1995 | By Michelle Conlin, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT Contributing to this report were Inquirer staff writer Anthony R. Wood and correspondent Rena Singer
Though the Philadelphia region's typical tornado is more likely to shred a roof than flatten a house, folks here have more in common with Great Plains residents than they might think. Together, Southeastern Pennsylvania, central New Jersey and northern Delaware have the second-highest incidence of tornadoes of any area in the northeastern United States from Maine to West Virginia, according to Delaware's climatologist, Dan Leathers. Central Massachusetts ranks first, he says. "People that live in this area really kind of live in a tornado hot spot.
NEWS
April 14, 1995 | by Ramona Smith, Daily News Staff Writer
The fumes that burst from the Sun Co.'s South Philadelphia refinery this week gave new evidence of the need for a community warning system, angry neighbors said yesterday. "If the air had been blowing (in this direction), it could have been a major catastrophe because we have no warning system here," said Dess Stokes, coordinator of the South/Southwest Philadelphia Community Task Force. A dozen activists met with reporters near a playground at 63rd Street and Lindbergh Boulevard to voice concern and call for installation by Sun of sirens or some other warning system.
NEWS
August 20, 1998 | By Usha Lee McFarling, INQUIRER WASHINGTON BUREAU
In the 1920s, long before Doppler radars monitored the nation's skies, tornadoes descended without warning and killed thousands each year. Since then, satellites, supercomputers and storm chasers have turned tornado hunting into a science, with wind data flowing almost instantaneously into tornado forecasts. Minutes of lead time have cut tornado deaths to fewer than 70 per year. But scientists and disaster experts are frustrated that their fast-accumulating tornado expertise isn't saving even more lives.
NEWS
May 11, 1988 | By Patricia Edmonds and David Ashenfelter, Inquirer Washington Bureau
Federal investigators concluded yesterday that Northwest Airlines Flight 255 crashed in Detroit in August, killing 156 people, because the pilots did not set the jet's wing slats and flaps for takeoff and did not review a pre- flight checklist that should have exposed the fatal error. The National Transportation Safety Board (NTSB) said a contributing factor in the crash, the nation's second-worst commercial aviation accident, was the failure of a cockpit warning system to signal that the flaps and slats were not set. The board said that the system was not getting electrical power but that it had not determined why. Only Cecelia Cichan, 5, survived when the McDonnell Douglas MD-80 jet crashed shortly after takeoff at Detroit Metro Airport on the evening of Aug. 16. She and her family were returning to their home in Tempe, Ariz.
NEWS
March 29, 2002 | By Tom Avril INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Starting this fall, Philadelphia will be the nation's first test site for an experimental asthma warning system, giving those who have the condition up to 48 hours' notice of bad air quality. The program, announced yesterday by Christie Whitman, administrator of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, is being developed by researchers at the University of Delaware with the help of an EPA grant. The computer model will be based on past data of weather conditions, air pollution, and the number of emergency-room admissions for asthma in Philadelphia.
NEWS
October 11, 1990 | By Lisa Moorhead, Special to The Inquirer
To comply with an order from the Department of Environmental Resources, the Ridley Park Borough Council has authorized the borough engineer to design a warning system to alert downstream communities if the Ridley Park Lake dam should ever fail. The council voted, 7-0, at its Tuesday night meeting to have Pennoni Associates develop an emergency warning system and operation plan in addition to an inspection program for the dam. Council member Gail Heinemeyer announced at the meeting that the borough had received a letter from the DER dated Sept.
NEWS
March 6, 1996 | by William Bunch, Daily News Staff Writer
Where there's smoke, they're fired. The two security guards at the Philadelphia Zoo who smelled smoke near the World of Primates on Dec. 23 but didn't immediately report it - missing a chance to prevent the deadliest zoo fire in American history - were officially canned yesterday. The embattled zoo president, Alexander "Pete" Hoskins, announced the firing of the unnamed guards during a news conference. The guards, whose names have never been released to the public, had been suspended since late December.
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BUSINESS
February 8, 2012 | By Scott Sturgis, For The Inquirer
In the race to recapture the attention of distracted drivers, Cadillac is skipping the lights and chimes and whistles. It's offering a vibration in the seat - left side or right side - to tell drivers when another car approacheth. Cheeky. It's just the newest way to pull drivers' attention back to the task at hand - or, in this instance, warn them, when backing out of a parking space, of a vehicle about to cross their path. Yet, the drive toward new ways of saying "Look at the road, pal" dances intimately with consumers' desire for ever-cooler high-tech gadgetry that serves to keep us distracted.
NEWS
March 23, 2011 | By John Timpane, Inquirer Staff Writer
Have tsunamis or earthquakes been in your dreams? You're not alone. Such images arise in dreams all the time. But since the catastrophes afflicting Japan after the March 11 earthquake and tsunami, they take on new meaning. What, if anything, do such dreams tell us? They're a response to human suffering - and a portal to the stress in our personal lives. They're a survival strategy as old as evolution. And - at the outer limits of dream theory - there's the possibility that dreams may be a kind of transspecies early-warning system.
NEWS
July 13, 2005 | By Toni Callas INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Since floodwaters ravaged parts of Burlington County one year ago, officials in Medford and other heavily hit municipalities have been piecing their towns back together. Yesterday, in addition to touting their new federal designation as the county's first "StormReady" community, Medford officials reviewed the progress they have made to be ready should disaster strike again. "All of the efforts make us better prepared one year after the floods to serve Medford residents in times of emergencies," said Mayor Walter Urban Jr. Known as the "1,000-year storm," the torrential rains that flooded the region in 12 hours on July 12-13 hit Medford, Medford Lakes, Lumberton, Southampton and Tabernacle especially hard.
NEWS
December 22, 2004 | By Jennifer Moroz INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
New Jersey's Department of Environmental Protection should have more enforcement power over dam owners who won't make necessary fixes. And officials should install a system to quickly alert municipalities and homeowners when floodwater could be heading their way. Those were some of the recommendations released yesterday in Burlington County by a task force formed after more than a foot of rain hit parts of the county July 12, overwhelming dams...
NEWS
December 2, 2004
Tom Ridge deserves thanks not only for serving well in a thankless job as secretary of homeland security, but also for providing the perfect moment to get rid of the color-coded warning system he created. It's easy now to forget the extraordinarily difficult circumstances under which Ridge left the governor's chair in Pennsylvania. Lower Manhattan was still in smoldering ruins when President Bush called Ridge in September 2001 to serve as homeland security adviser. Less than one month after he was appointed, Ridge was confronted with an anthrax attack at the U.S. Capitol, and performed admirably in reassuring a badly shaken public that the deadly bacteria had been contained.
NEWS
March 29, 2002 | By Tom Avril INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Starting this fall, Philadelphia will be the nation's first test site for an experimental asthma warning system, giving those who have the condition up to 48 hours' notice of bad air quality. The program, announced yesterday by Christie Whitman, administrator of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, is being developed by researchers at the University of Delaware with the help of an EPA grant. The computer model will be based on past data of weather conditions, air pollution, and the number of emergency-room admissions for asthma in Philadelphia.
NEWS
March 14, 2002
Resist the temptation for cheap jokes: Who said Tom Ridge isn't a colorful guy! In this dangerous new world, where terrorism could come from anywhere, anytime, Homeland Security Director Ridge's color-coded terrorism warning system may be far from perfect. But it's a rational, organized response to unpredictable mayhem - an improvement over vague terrorism "alerts" that mainly left the public and local law enforcement agencies confused. Ripples from the new alert codes should lead to improved security systems throughout the public and private sectors.
NEWS
February 23, 2002 | By Seth Borenstein INQUIRER WASHINGTON BUREAU
Those vague domestic terrorism alerts from grim-faced federal officials have not worked well, experts say, so the terror warning system is about to get an overhaul. Homeland Security Director Tom Ridge is expected to announce a new alert system in the next few weeks. His office is floating a four-step system whose alarms would be, in descending order, "critical, serious, alert and ready," said Peter Ward, interim chairman of the Partnership for Public Warning, a new nonprofit in McLean, Va., that is promoting a better national alarm system.
NEWS
January 10, 2000 | By Jonathan S. Landay, INQUIRER WASHINGTON BUREAU
Russia's early-warning system is so decayed that Moscow is unable to detect U.S. intercontinental ballistic missile launches for at least seven hours a day and no longer can spot missiles fired from American submarines at all, U.S. officials and experts say. At most, only four of Russia's 21 early-warning satellites are still working, according to experts on Moscow's space program. That gives Russian commanders no more than 17 hours, and perhaps as little as 12 hours, of daily coverage of the 550 nuclear-tipped ICBMS in silos in Colorado, Montana, Nebraska, North Dakota and Wyoming.
NEWS
September 30, 1999
"Sentinel chickens. " It sounds like the name of a sophomoric show on the Comedy Channel. But a joke it's not. There really are such birds, and Pennsylvania should think of getting some soon. Sentinel chickens describe the birds' role, not their species. They are ordinary chickens penned up in locations particularly susceptible to swarming mosquitoes. Periodic tests of their blood offer an early warning sign of mosquito-borne diseases - particularly the encephalitis strains that have appeared in New York City and could migrate to surrounding states.
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