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Warren Buffett

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BUSINESS
March 1, 2013 | By Josh Funk, Associated Press
OMAHA, Neb. - What will life be like without Warren Buffett? Berkshire Hathaway shareholders may have gotten a glimpse into that future. Most of Berkshire's deals last year didn't directly involve the 82-year-old investor. They originated with a subsidiary of the conglomerate, or with one of the two investment managers Buffett has hired. Either way, Berkshire did well in 2012. Buffett's annual letter to shareholders will be released Friday afternoon. Jeff Matthews, who wrote Warren Buffett's Successor: Who It Is and Why It Matters , said last year's deals are comforting because they show how the company might work after Buffett is gone.
BUSINESS
October 15, 2012 | By Reid Kanaley, Inquirer Columnist
Is Warren Buffett, the octogenarian billionaire and "Sage of Omaha," a model for small investors to imitate, or are his methods more suited for corporate titans than for the commoner? You be the judge. A site that bills itself as "your free source to invest like Buffett is divided into three "courses": introductory lessons in so-called value investing, followed by intermediate and advanced lessons in Buffetteering. The site was developed by Buffettologist Preston Pysh, who has a book, Warren Buffett's Three Favorite Books . Value investors look for stocks and bonds that can be bought at what appears to be bargain prices, on the theory that those investments should increase in value over time.
NEWS
June 27, 2006
For more than a decade, Warren Buffett has been the likable face of American capitalism - steady, thrifty, full of homespun quips. He was richer than almost anyone, thanks to the old-fashioned investing genius of his company, Berkeley Hathaway Inc., but he flaunted neither his wealth nor his smarts. It's been a great act. Especially since now it's clear it wasn't just an act. Buffett didn't just play the part of a billionaire with his head screwed on straight. He is that guy. He just announced he's giving 85 percent of his fortune, valued Friday at $44 billion, to charity - with most going to the foundation begun by his friend, Microsoft founder Bill Gates.
NEWS
March 13, 2013
John J. Byrne Jr., 80, the chairman and chief executive of Geico who was credited with leading the insurance giant from near-bankruptcy to profitability in the late 1970s - an achievement that remains one of the celebrated turnarounds in modern business history - died Thursday at his home in Etna, N.H. His death, from cancer, was confirmed by his colleague Bob Snyder. For years, Mr. Byrne was one of the most prominent businessmen in Washington, and for decades, he was one of the most noted executives in his industry.
BUSINESS
April 30, 2011 | By Josh Funk, Associated Press
OMAHA, Neb. - Warren Buffett is sure to face tough questions about former Berkshire Hathaway executive David Sokol at this weekend's shareholders meeting. The company issued a report this week that said the former top executive violated the company's ethics policies. Some shareholders say the incident - stemming from Sokol's purchase of Lubrizol stock shortly before he recommended that Berkshire buy the chemical company - demonstrates a weakness of Berkshire's highly decentralized business model.
NEWS
December 20, 2012
WHEN INVESTING, it's smart to seek out companies with competitive advantages. But you can develop your own competitive advantage over other investors by reading. Here are two highly regarded classics for your own bookshelf or for holiday-gift-giving consideration: *  One Up on Wall Street by Peter Lynch (Simon & Schuster, $16). Arguably the most engaging investment book ever written. If you've never read it, stop everything and pick up a copy. It could change your life. Advocating buying great companies for the long term, Lynch believes that "any normal person using the customary 3 percent of the brain can pick stocks just as well, if not better than the average Wall Street analyst.
BUSINESS
February 28, 2012 | By David Sell, Inquirer Staff Writer
Billionaire and investing icon Warren Buffett said Monday that health-care giant Johnson & Johnson has "obviously messed up in a lot of ways in the last few years. " Buffett is chairman of Berkshire Hathaway Inc., the investment company that owns or holds sizable positions in companies in numerous industries. J&J, Wells Fargo, Burlington Northern, and Coca-Cola are among the prominent companies in its portfolio. Buffett said Berkshire has not sold its stake but "we might.
BUSINESS
April 1, 2011 | By Josh Funk and Jonathan Fahey, Associated Press
OMAHA, Neb. - Warren Buffett is called an oracle and a cult hero not just because he has made himself one of the world's richest people, but also because he comes across as folksy and, above all, honest. Now, he has found himself in the unusual position of having to explain a top Berkshire Hathaway Inc. executive's questionable behavior. The situation: A key executive thought to be a potential successor to the 80-year-old Buffett persuaded Buffett to buy a chemical company that the executive had personally invested in. The executive, David Sokol, saw his investment grow by $3 million, or 29 percent, after Berkshire bought the company, Lubrizol Corp.
BUSINESS
January 7, 2014 | By Erin E. Arvedlund, Inquirer Columnist
Want to "green" your portfolio? You can invest in mutual funds that keep an eye on the environment by owning shares in companies that, say, treat wastewater used in the "fracking" of natural gas, one of Pennsylvania's booming industries. Pax World is just one of several mutual fund outfits that offers what's known as a "fossil fuel-free" mutual fund, one that includes investments in energy efficiency, alternative energies like solar and so-called low-carbon technologies. Joe Keefe, president and CEO of Pax World Management, based in Portsmouth, N.H., recommends "a multipronged approach.
BUSINESS
April 13, 2013 | By Teresa F. Lindeman, Pittsburgh Post-Gazette
The partners buying Pittsburgh's H.J. Heinz Co. have chosen one of their own to take over as chief executive officer after the $28 billion sale goes through. Bernardo Hees, who has been CEO of Burger King Worldwide Inc. and who previously ran a railroad and logistics company, will succeed Bill Johnson, according to an announcement Thursday. Johnson's role after the sale of the company to Warren Buffett's Berkshire Hathaway and 3G Capital isn't clear. He has led Heinz for 15 years and will continue as chairman, president, and CEO through the transaction.
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SPORTS
March 17, 2014 | By Bob Ford, Inquirer Columnist
I am reading about graph theory and the pairwise relationships between objects. Very soon, there will be many pairwise relationships scheduled between basketball teams, and it is very important to understand these. Reading about graph theory is not fun - at least not for me - but it will be necessary to understand when it is time to decide if there is a graph that can properly predict whether the fourth representative from the Atlantic Coast Conference is superior in time, space, and three-point percentage to the automatic qualifier from the Sun Belt Conference.
BUSINESS
January 7, 2014 | By Erin E. Arvedlund, Inquirer Columnist
Want to "green" your portfolio? You can invest in mutual funds that keep an eye on the environment by owning shares in companies that, say, treat wastewater used in the "fracking" of natural gas, one of Pennsylvania's booming industries. Pax World is just one of several mutual fund outfits that offers what's known as a "fossil fuel-free" mutual fund, one that includes investments in energy efficiency, alternative energies like solar and so-called low-carbon technologies. Joe Keefe, president and CEO of Pax World Management, based in Portsmouth, N.H., recommends "a multipronged approach.
BUSINESS
July 8, 2013 | By Reid Kanaley, Inquirer Columnist
Where are the great minds and best decisions in business - and what have been the great failures? Here are some answers and, perhaps, some lessons for the rest of us. What do Amazon.com founder Jeff Bezos, Oprah Winfrey, and Ross Perot have in common? According to the "Great Minds in Business" feature section at Entrepreneur.com, they are among many visionary entrepreneurs. The site has biographical sketches of dozens of such visionaries, including Steve Jobs, hip-hop promoter Russell Simmons, and McDonald's Corp.
BUSINESS
May 7, 2013 | By Matthew Craft, Associated Press
NEW YORK - Bank of America led a rally in big-bank stocks in mostly quiet trading Monday. Stock indexes ended little changed following a record-setting run last week. News that Bank of America and MBIA, a bond-insurance company, had reached a settlement over a long-running dispute propelled both companies' stocks. BofA will pay $1.7 billion to MBIA and extend the troubled company a credit line. MBIA soared 45 percent, or $4.46, to $14.29. Bank of America gained 5 percent, or 64 cents, to $12.88, making it the leading company in the Dow Jones industrial average.
BUSINESS
April 13, 2013 | By Teresa F. Lindeman, Pittsburgh Post-Gazette
The partners buying Pittsburgh's H.J. Heinz Co. have chosen one of their own to take over as chief executive officer after the $28 billion sale goes through. Bernardo Hees, who has been CEO of Burger King Worldwide Inc. and who previously ran a railroad and logistics company, will succeed Bill Johnson, according to an announcement Thursday. Johnson's role after the sale of the company to Warren Buffett's Berkshire Hathaway and 3G Capital isn't clear. He has led Heinz for 15 years and will continue as chairman, president, and CEO through the transaction.
NEWS
March 13, 2013
John J. Byrne Jr., 80, the chairman and chief executive of Geico who was credited with leading the insurance giant from near-bankruptcy to profitability in the late 1970s - an achievement that remains one of the celebrated turnarounds in modern business history - died Thursday at his home in Etna, N.H. His death, from cancer, was confirmed by his colleague Bob Snyder. For years, Mr. Byrne was one of the most prominent businessmen in Washington, and for decades, he was one of the most noted executives in his industry.
BUSINESS
March 6, 2013 | By David Sell, Inquirer Staff Writer
Warren Buffett's annual shareholder letter is much followed by investors, and the latest version does not include Johnson & Johnson for the first time since 2005. The letter, released over the weekend, lists the companies in which the billionaire or Berkshire Hathaway, of which he is chairman, hold at least $1 billion in stock. With product recalls, patient lawsuits, and a federal investigation pending, Buffett was critical of J&J in February 2012 when he discussed his annual letter, telling CNBC that the health-care giant "obviously messed up in a lot of ways in the last few years.
BUSINESS
March 1, 2013 | By Josh Funk, Associated Press
OMAHA, Neb. - What will life be like without Warren Buffett? Berkshire Hathaway shareholders may have gotten a glimpse into that future. Most of Berkshire's deals last year didn't directly involve the 82-year-old investor. They originated with a subsidiary of the conglomerate, or with one of the two investment managers Buffett has hired. Either way, Berkshire did well in 2012. Buffett's annual letter to shareholders will be released Friday afternoon. Jeff Matthews, who wrote Warren Buffett's Successor: Who It Is and Why It Matters , said last year's deals are comforting because they show how the company might work after Buffett is gone.
NEWS
December 20, 2012
WHEN INVESTING, it's smart to seek out companies with competitive advantages. But you can develop your own competitive advantage over other investors by reading. Here are two highly regarded classics for your own bookshelf or for holiday-gift-giving consideration: *  One Up on Wall Street by Peter Lynch (Simon & Schuster, $16). Arguably the most engaging investment book ever written. If you've never read it, stop everything and pick up a copy. It could change your life. Advocating buying great companies for the long term, Lynch believes that "any normal person using the customary 3 percent of the brain can pick stocks just as well, if not better than the average Wall Street analyst.
BUSINESS
October 15, 2012 | By Reid Kanaley, Inquirer Columnist
Is Warren Buffett, the octogenarian billionaire and "Sage of Omaha," a model for small investors to imitate, or are his methods more suited for corporate titans than for the commoner? You be the judge. A site that bills itself as "your free source to invest like Buffett is divided into three "courses": introductory lessons in so-called value investing, followed by intermediate and advanced lessons in Buffetteering. The site was developed by Buffettologist Preston Pysh, who has a book, Warren Buffett's Three Favorite Books . Value investors look for stocks and bonds that can be bought at what appears to be bargain prices, on the theory that those investments should increase in value over time.
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