CollectionsWarren Commission
IN THE NEWS

Warren Commission

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
January 31, 1992 | by Nicole Weisensee, Special to the Daily News
Thirteen former Warren Commission counsel and staff members - including Sen. Arlen Specter, R-Pa. - yesterday added their voices to the growing chorus seeking release of all documents relating to the John F. Kennedy assassination. In a letter to Don Wilson, archivist of the United States, the 13 said they stood firmly behind the work they did and felt that full disclosure of the documents would vindicate them. The group asked Wilson to release all material related to the commission's investigation.
NEWS
November 22, 2002
The Commission has found no evidence that either Lee Harvey Oswald or Jack Ruby was part of any conspiracy, domestic or foreign, to assassinate President Kennedy. . . . If there is any such evidence it has been beyond the reach of all the investigative agencies and resources of the United States and has not come to the attention of this Commission. - Report of the Warren Commission, September 1964
NEWS
May 20, 1992 | by Nicole Weisensee, Special to the Daily News
Sen. Arlen Specter, R-Pa., crucified in Oliver Stone's hit movie "JFK" for his single-bullet assassination theory, yesterday eagerly embraced a medical journal article that supports the Warren Commission's findings. A new article for the Journal of the American Medical Association, which includes interviews with two doctors who performed the autopsy on President John F. Kennedy, confirms the Warren Commission's conclusion that Kennedy was hit by only two bullets. However, both the editor of the journal and Specter admitted the article contains no new information and recapitulates statements the doctors, James Humes and J. Boswell, made to the commission nearly 30 years ago. Critics of the Warren Commission immediately blasted the article.
NEWS
March 23, 1992 | BY JACK MCKINNEY
In the commercially acclaimed film, "Amadeus," British dramatist and screenwriter Peter Shaffer had composer Antonio Salieri hastening the death of young Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart, allegedly because the older man was so envious of the Austrian prodigy's talent. This contrived story line was a nasty rap to hang on Italy's Salieri, one of the most successful composers of his day and a superb teacher, whose only fault was in living long enough to slip into a senile delusion that left him babbling about some wholly imagined guilt.
NEWS
June 6, 1994 | By Joyce Vottima Hellberg, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Mark Crouch got right to the point. "How many people do not believe Lee Harvey Oswald acted alone when John F. Kennedy was shot?" Every hand in the 20th-century American history class at Marple Newtown High School went up. "But how many of you know for a fact that the Warren Commission report is a lie?" Only a few hands went up. Crouch, 39, a 20-year broadcast journalist, told the students he had proof that the Warren Commission's single-bullet theory was false.
NEWS
February 6, 1992 | By JAMES W. HILTY
Oliver Stone's JFK is a tantalizing motion picture. The movie feeds on America's insecurities by shamelessly milking the sentiment of the Kennedy mystique, indiscriminately blending fact and discredited conspiracy theories and generously employing one of Hollywood's recipes for box-office success: The single, dedicated heroic investigator tilting against establishment windmills. The key to the movie's lack of historical credibility rests on one crucial question asked in the movie and again recently by Sen. Arlen Specter (Commentary Page, Jan. 5)
NEWS
September 7, 1993
It sometimes seems as if Sen. Arlen Specter has two opinions on every subject. But for nearly 30 years, Specter has single-mindedly stuck to his guns on the "single-bullet theory," of which he is the author. As a junior counsel on the Warren Commission investigating the Nov. 22, 1963 assassination of President John F. Kennedy, Specter devised the notion that a single bullet ripped through Kennedy's back as he rode in the presidential limousine through Dallas, exited, struck Texas Gov. John Connally in the shoulder as he rode in the seat in front, shattered his fifth right rib, exited, struck Connally in the wrist, exited, and struck the governor in his left thigh, breaking the skin.
NEWS
November 24, 1993 | BY JACK MCKINNEY
It's not all that surprising to learn that more Americans than ever refuse to accept the official line of the Warren Commission on the assassination of John F. Kennedy. What's surprising is that so many of the more than 80 percent who reject that line have done so out of gut instinct, despite the failure of the news media ever to acknowledge what a flawed investigative body the Warren Commission really was. For example, most young adults are unaware that the panel never functioned as the cohesive, fact-finding body it was widely assumed to be. During the 10 months in which it was supposed to be operational, the Warren Commission really existed only on official letterheads and in the group photographs taken when it was nominally impaneled.
NEWS
March 20, 1992 | BY JACK MCKINNEY
Leafing through a four-inch stack of newspaper clips on Oliver Stone's film, "JFK," one significant factor about his renewal of attention in the assassination of President John F. Kennedy seemed to have gone unnoticed. Vituperation and scorn were heaped on Stone by the media. He was accused of gross exploitation and slick misrepresentation. But no one of repute thanked Stone for forcing a serious re-examination of one of the most grotesque travesties in this nation's history - the investigation and purportedly objective conclusions of the so-called Warren Commission.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 10, 1991 | By Andy Wickstrom, Special to The Inquirer
More than 25 years after the fact, the assassination of President John F. Kennedy still provides fertile ground for conspiracy theorists. Was Lee Harvey Oswald a Soviet agent? An assassin sent by Fidel Castro? A pawn of organized crime? A deluded personality acting on his own? Such questions may never be answered, but their validity is made strikingly clear in a documentary from White Star Video called Reasonable Doubt (51 minutes, $29.95). Produced by Chip Selby in 1988 (the 25th anniversary of the slaying)
1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
November 23, 2013 | By Chris Mondics, Inquirer Staff Writer
By almost any measure, it's safe to say William Thaddeus Coleman Jr. has had a remarkable legal career. First in his class at Harvard Law School in 1946. First African American to serve as a clerk for a Supreme Court justice. Transportation Secretary under President Gerald R. Ford, adviser to nine other presidents, and, finally, a corporate lawyer who routinely pulled down fees of $1,200 an hour. Coleman, a Philadelphia native, also was the first African American to go to work for an old-line Philadelphia law firm, single-handedly breaking the color barrier of the city's legal establishment.
NEWS
November 22, 2013 | BY GARY THOMPSON, Daily News Staff Writer thompsg@phillynews.com, 215-854-5992
THE SHEER number of movies about JFK attest to Hollywood's fascination with his life and death - a fascination that began even before he became president in 1961. Then-Sen. John F. Kennedy was a model for the handsome young Irish-American war hero/politician who defeats veteran mayor Spencer Tracy in John Ford's "The Last Hurrah," released in 1958. Once elected president, the image-savvy Kennedy helped forge his own myth - his administration worked with Hollywood in approving and developing "PT- 109" (1963)
NEWS
November 19, 2013
MY 9/11 WAS 11/22. I remember where I was - each time in a newspaper office. For Nov. 22, 1963, I was the boss of four weekly newspapers in Brooklyn. I ordered my reporters to hit the streets while I pulled together everything we had on every visit John F. Kennedy made to Brooklyn, where he was idolized. For Sept. 11, 2001, I was a gossip columnist here, sidelined by the tragedy. I watched it unfold on TV, with horror and anger, just like you. Some of you felt fear, but I felt fury and the dreadful realization that our oceans no longer protected us. On 11/22, I felt a bottomless sadness and the sickening realization that our decency no longer protected us. Sept.
NEWS
October 20, 2013 | By Jennifer Lin, Inquirer Staff Writer
Until the very end, Sen. Arlen Specter insisted that one shooter - and only one - killed President John F. Kennedy. The "single bullet theory" was no theory, Specter would snap whenever the topic came up. "It's a conclusion," he repeatedly asserted. Specter, who died in 2012, was a rising young prosecutor when he joined the Warren Commission to investigate the Kennedy assassination. In a decision that continues to draw critics and controversy, the commission pinned the killing on Lee Harvey Oswald.
NEWS
March 6, 2013 | By Susan Snyder, Inquirer Staff Writer
The voluminous archives of the late U.S. Sen. Arlen Specter are heading west. Philadelphia University, which has custody, has struck a deal with the University of Pittsburgh to process, preserve, and digitize significant portions of Specter's material, officials announced Monday. The job is huge. Imagine 2,700 boxes of papers, photographs, audio and video materials, and memorabilia. That's enough to fill 337 four-drawer filing cabinets, notes Michael Dabrishus, Pitt's assistant university librarian.
NEWS
October 16, 2012
Arlen Specter was a fighter. He fought crime as a prosecutor. He fought political opponents as a U.S. senator. He fought cancer on more than one occasion. But most of all, he fought for the people of the adopted state that became dear to him - Pennsylvania. Specter died Sunday from complications of non-Hodgkin's lymphoma. He was 82. Having been elected to the U.S. Senate in 1980, 1986, 1992, 1998, and 2004, Specter served in that office longer than anyone in Pennsylvania history.
NEWS
October 16, 2012 | BY JOHN F. MORRISON, Daily News Staff Writer
FOR ARLEN SPECTER, independence was a cherished ideal, and he largely followed that philosophy through political currents that often turned treacherous. Specter graduated from the University of Pennsylvania and then Yale University. He lived in East Falls with his wife, Joan. They have two sons and four grandchildren. Among the highlights of Specter's public career: *  1964: Specter was the author of the "single-bullet" theory in the assassination of President John F. Kennedy as counsel to the Warren Commission.
NEWS
February 6, 2008 | By Arlen Specter
Benazir Bhutto's assassination was an extraordinary shock to me because Rep. Patrick Kennedy (D., R.I.) and I were scheduled to meet with her three hours later in Islamabad. It took my thoughts to JFK's assassination, my previous meetings with her when she was prime minister, and the devastating loss to Pakistan of a vibrant leader who had the potential to unify and stabilize the tottering nation. From my work on the Warren Commission staff, I was immediately troubled by the failure of the local authorities to secure the crime scene.
NEWS
November 25, 2005 | By Patrick Kerkstra INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
There are some subjects - and the web of conspiracy theories surrounding the assassination of John F. Kennedy is certainly among them - that most members of the academic establishment avoid as much as possible. And then there is Temple University's Joan Mellen, whose new book, A Farewell to Justice, pins the murder on the U.S. government itself. "Long live tenure," said Mellen, an English professor who has written an eclectic collection of 17 books. Her latest, which was published last week, started out as a biography of Jim Garrison, the New Orleans district attorney whose investigation of the assassination was dramatized in Oliver Stone's 1991 film JFK. But in her research on Garrison, Mellen soon became fascinated by the assassination itself.
NEWS
November 28, 2003 | By John Timpane
Like millions of Americans, I watched the Kennedy television specials last week. For many people (and not only of a single generation), JFK's assassination has become a national recurring nightmare. And over the weekend, as the 40th anniversary came and went, I realized two things. First: In light of (and despite) the evidence, it's likely that Lee Harvey Oswald fired the shots that killed Kennedy. Second: Frustration persists. And I think I know why. I watched hours of conspiracy theory - that it was the Chicago Mob, the Corsican Mob, Cuba, LBJ, the CIA, or Russia who had JFK killed.
1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
|
|
|
|
|