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Warren Court

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NEWS
June 25, 1986 | By BENNO C. SCHMIDT JR., From the New York Times
President Reagan's long-expected chance to reshape the United States Supreme Court has presented itself at last, and the President has seized it in a way that signals a watershed in the history of the Court. With Chief Justice Warren E. Burger's announcement that he will step down at the end of the Court's current term, the president's nominations of Associate Justice William H. Rehnquist to become chief justice of the United States and of Judge Antonin Scalia to become an associate justice are plainly designed to produce seismic change in the content of our constitutional law and in the role of the Supreme Court.
NEWS
October 6, 1991 | By Aaron Epstein, Inquirer Washington Bureau
Having said farewell to the last traditional liberal on their bench and now awaiting the arrival of yet another conservative, the Supreme Court justices will open their new term tomorrow amid predictions of fundamental changes in constitutional rights. Many experts believe the court will veer away from - or renounce - past endorsements of racial preferences in affirmative action programs, a woman's right to have an abortion, and a generally strict separation of government and religion.
NEWS
July 13, 1986 | By Aaron Epstein, Inquirer Washington Bureau
Warren E. Burger, who served longer than any other chief justice appointed in this century, may be remembered most for what he and the other members of the Burger court did not do. When Burger replaced Earl Warren as chief justice of the United States in 1969, he was expected to lead the court in a dramatic movement to the right, rolling back - or even repealing - the liberal doctrines of the Warren years that had infuriated so many Americans....
NEWS
March 8, 1992 | By Dominic Sama, INQUIRER STAMPS WRITER
Earl Warren, the late chief justice of the United States, whose broad interpretations of law helped expand civil liberties, will be honored tomorrow on a 29-cent definitive of the Great Americans Series. Warren is the 52d person honored in the series that debuted in 1980. He also is the fifth member of the Supreme Court to appear on a stamp, following John Marshall, Hugo L. Black, Oliver Wendell Holmes Jr. and Harlan Fiske Stone. First-day ceremonies will be held in the Lower Great Hall of the Supreme Court Building in Washington.
NEWS
May 27, 2009 | By Jim Newton
Is empathy a desirable quality in a U.S. Supreme Court justice? President Obama said he was searching for it. But as a qualification for a jurist, it gives conservatives the willies and can produce mixed results. We expect judges to resist empathy and impose the law evenhandedly. We are appropriately outraged when a judge goes easy on a defendant with whom he identifies - the suburban white kid, say, who gets community service, whereas his urban black counterpart goes off to jail.
NEWS
June 21, 1986 | By George F. Will
Zeke Bonura was a large and remarkably immobile first baseman whose slowness did not grieve him because he understood a vital principle of baseball: You are rarely charged with an error when you do not touch the ball. Conservatives have hoped the Supreme Court would adhere to the Bonura insight, sometimes known as judicial restraint. The Burger Court has not. Indeed, its judicial activism has been as marked as, and arguably more destructive than, the Warren Court's. None of the Warren Court's most important rulings has been overturned or even significantly circumscribed in the 17 Burger years.
NEWS
June 29, 1986
Following is the text of an interview by Bruce S. Rosen, editor-in-chief of the New Jersey Law Journal, with Justice William J. Brennan Jr., 80, of the U.S. Supreme Court shortly after President Reagan announced the retirement of Chief Justice Warren E. Burger. Justice Brennan has been among the liberal voices on the court for 30 years. Some responses have been abridged. Question - Was the retirement of Chief Justice Warren E. Burger and nomination of William H. Rehnquist to succeed him a complete surprise?
NEWS
June 26, 1995 | By Aaron Epstein, INQUIRER WASHINGTON BUREAU This article contains information from the Associated Press
Retired Chief Justice Warren E. Burger, 87, the nation's 15th chief justice who served from 1969 to 1986, the longest tenure of this century, died yesterday. Justice Burger died of congestive heart failure at Sibley Memorial Hospital, said Toni House, spokeswoman for the court. "Justice Burger was a strong, powerful, visionary chief justice who opened the doors of opportunity," President Clinton said in a statement issued in Little Rock. "As chief justice, he was concerned with the administration of the court, serving with enthusiasm and always making sure it was above reproach.
NEWS
July 5, 1991 | BY KATHLEEN M. SULLIVAN, From the New York Times
Great Supreme Court dissents lie like buried ammunition for future generations to unearth when the time comes. In 1919 Justice Oliver Wendell Holmes refused to join in sending socialist leafleteers to prison. He wrote, joined by Justice Louis D. Brandeis, that "we should be eternally vigilant against attempts to check the expression of opinions that we loathe. " That dissent laid the ground for flag-burners' First Amendment victories decades later. And when Justice John Marshall Harlan dissented from an 1896 decision that upheld segregated railway cars, he armed the Warren Court with the basis for holding, in its 1954 decision in Brown vs. Board of Education, that "the doctrine of 'separate but equal' has no place.
NEWS
May 16, 2004 | By Chris Satullo
An observation on the 50th anniversary of the Supreme Court ruling known as Brown v. Board of Education: Not every case in which someone asserts a "right" is comparable to Brown v. Board. Not every cause possesses the moral urgency of ending segregation. But too many cases and causes puff themselves up by claiming Brown's mantle. The results: a fateful increase in liberal sanctimony, a worrisome decrease in democratic patience, and a predictable backlash against the courts.
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NEWS
June 26, 2015 | BY WILL BUNCH, Daily News Staff Writer bunchw@phillynews.com, 215-854-2957
SIX YEARS AGO, Lisa Longo of Phoenixville lobbied as an activist for President Obama's Affordable Care Act, known popularly as "Obamacare. " Today, the 50-year-old single mom, who works as an independent management consultant, depends on it. Without the $200-a-month subsidy she receives on the health insurance she buys through the government's marketplace, her 19-year-old daughter would lose access to doctors she's seen for the last decade, and...
NEWS
October 20, 2012 | By Dick Polman, For The Inquirer
The presidential candidates have debated each other for 180 minutes, yet neither has expended even a second on a crucial campaign issue that has a profound impact on our lives. Joe Biden managed to mention it in the waning moments of the vice presidential debate - "Keep your eye on the Supreme Court," he said - but when America is in campaign mode, we tend to avert our eyes from this subject. Candidates rarely talk about the future composition of the court, apparently out of fear that they will be accused of politicizing the august institution.
NEWS
April 16, 2010 | By CHRISTINE FLOWERS
I RARELY agree with Dahlia Lithwick, the legal analyst with an almost reflexive aversion to anything right of center. In fact, the only thing we share is a floral moniker. But I did a double-take when I caught her recent Newsweek essay that approvingly described retiring Justice John Paul Stevens as an "89- year-old white Protestant guy. " She wasn't actually singing the praises of WASPs, who, as one of my colleagues just reminded us, are among the last acceptable targets of derision in this evolved society.
NEWS
July 9, 2009 | By KITTY CAPARELLA, caparek@phillynews.com 215-854-5880
U.S. Supreme Court nominee Sonia Sotomayor is under fire for her ruling as a lower-court judge in a landmark reverse-discrimination case. But a legal expert suggests critics apparently wanted her to be "telepathic or a psychic" to know in advance how the High Court would ultimately rule. Dahlia Lithwick, a legal expert for the Web site Slate.com, said Sotomayor was following the existing case law when she voted to overturn the promotion of white firefighters in New Haven - but then the Supreme Court created a new precedent.
NEWS
May 27, 2009 | By Jim Newton
Is empathy a desirable quality in a U.S. Supreme Court justice? President Obama said he was searching for it. But as a qualification for a jurist, it gives conservatives the willies and can produce mixed results. We expect judges to resist empathy and impose the law evenhandedly. We are appropriately outraged when a judge goes easy on a defendant with whom he identifies - the suburban white kid, say, who gets community service, whereas his urban black counterpart goes off to jail.
NEWS
April 27, 2005 | By Kathleen M. Sullivan
In William H. Rehnquist's tenure on the United States Supreme Court, nearly 20 as chief justice, he has led a partial conservative revolution in constitutional law. The court has dramatically resurrected states' rights against the federal government, but failed to stop a trend toward upholding greater individual liberties against the states. Seeing the states as the primary arenas for democracy and as useful checks on the power of the national government, Rehnquist has long taken the view that Congress' powers should be limited by the courts.
NEWS
May 16, 2004 | By Chris Satullo
An observation on the 50th anniversary of the Supreme Court ruling known as Brown v. Board of Education: Not every case in which someone asserts a "right" is comparable to Brown v. Board. Not every cause possesses the moral urgency of ending segregation. But too many cases and causes puff themselves up by claiming Brown's mantle. The results: a fateful increase in liberal sanctimony, a worrisome decrease in democratic patience, and a predictable backlash against the courts.
NEWS
August 3, 1997 | By Harry Keyishian
Tributes to Justice William J. Brennan since his death have stressed his deep concern with the effect of law on individuals. So does this one. When four colleagues and I at the State University of New York (SUNY) at Buffalo decided in 1963 to challenge the Feinberg Law - a 1949 Red Scare statute requiring that teachers and other government employees sign loyalty oaths - we felt fairly sure we would win. True, the Feinberg Law had been upheld several times in court, and a special faculty committee convened by SUNY's law school had concluded that it could not be overturned.
NEWS
July 11, 1997 | By Leon Friedman
Since the principle of judicial review was established in 1803 in the famous case of Marbury v. Madison, the Supreme Court has declared 141 federal laws unconstitutional, an average of less than one law every year. But in the last week of its 1996-97 term, the Supreme Court declared three federal laws unconstitutional. The laws involved were not minor or technical statutes. The court struck down the Religious Freedom Restoration Act, a law making it more difficult for government to burden religious practice, which was endorsed by almost all religious groups and passed by an almost unanimous Congress.
NEWS
June 26, 1995 | By Aaron Epstein, INQUIRER WASHINGTON BUREAU This article contains information from the Associated Press
Retired Chief Justice Warren E. Burger, 87, the nation's 15th chief justice who served from 1969 to 1986, the longest tenure of this century, died yesterday. Justice Burger died of congestive heart failure at Sibley Memorial Hospital, said Toni House, spokeswoman for the court. "Justice Burger was a strong, powerful, visionary chief justice who opened the doors of opportunity," President Clinton said in a statement issued in Little Rock. "As chief justice, he was concerned with the administration of the court, serving with enthusiasm and always making sure it was above reproach.
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