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Warren Haynes

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ENTERTAINMENT
October 3, 2015 | By A.D. Amorosi, For The Inquirer
Warren Haynes, who is to perform Friday at Tower Theater, is the blisteringly emotive guitarist behind Gov't Mule. He has done a lengthy tour of duty with the Allman Brothers, and he has a lot of solo work to his credit, including 2011's Man in Motion . Last time in Philly, in 2013, he was coming through with his Jerry Garcia Symphonic Celebration. "I know those guys and believe they pay tribute to Jerry while making their own way," Haynes says of Trey Anastasio and John Meyer, two guitarists who interpreted Garcia's classic lines while working this year with the Dead's leftovers.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 31, 2013 | By A.D. Amorosi, For The Inquirer
Warren Haynes has been in dozens of musical scenarios since starting his career in the 1980s as a combustible guitar-slinging sideman and front person. He's been a brother within the Allmans' framework, performed with orchestras, and acted as a sessioneer to the diverse likes of Dave Matthews, John Scofield, David Allan Coe, and more. His dense and blustery Gov't Mule put him at the top of the heap of hard-jamming blues players and collaborators. But it was playing with the Dead (once Grateful)
ENTERTAINMENT
December 29, 2012
Film New this week: Not Fade Away (*** out of four stars) Suburban New Jersey in the 1960s is carefully recreated by "Sopranos" auteur David Chase. John Magaro is great as Douglas, a gawky teen who finds confidence in his rock band. James Gandolfini, also of "The Sopranos," is the often-exasperated dad. A sprawling, often well-done tale. It's a hit. Rated R. . - Steven Rea Music Gov't Mule Formed as an Allman Brothers offshoot in 1994, Gov't Mule, which plays Dec. 28 and 29 at the Tower Theater, has kept its vigor and roadworthiness, becoming a much-followed jam band, due in large part to front man Warren Haynes.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 9, 1998 | By Faith Quintavell, FOR THE INQUIRER
Emotions deep and wide as the Mississippi informed the rugged blues/rock of Government Mule Friday at the Theater of Living Arts. During the 2 1/2-hour set, the trio fronted by former Allman Brothers Band guitarist Warren Haynes let loose with a river of feelings in a very satisfying evening of extended jamming. As is typical of jam bands, the second half of the show was less cerebral and more exciting than the first, when the band is still warming to the crowd. A typical segment during this golden time found the rhythm section of drummer Matt Abs and bassist Allen Woody - also formerly with the Allmans - doing alternating solos featuring a walking bass.
NEWS
August 30, 1990 | By Sam Wood, Special to The Inquirer
It was as if the '80s never happened. The Allman Brothers Band, rock-and- roll's Rip van Winkles, roared into the Mann Music Center on Tuesday with an evening of Southern blues and boogie that proved you don't have to pay heed to fashion to have a lot of style. The band, which reunited for a 20th-anniversary tour last summer, is touring to help promote Seven Turns (Epic), their first album of new material in nine years. For 2 1/2 hours, the Allmans showcased their rediscovered creative momentum with a dignity and ease that's rarely found in contemporary rock halls.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 30, 1994 | By Sam Wood, FOR THE INQUIRER
Nine bands, two stages, no waiting. So it didn't have the cutting-edge cachet of Lollapalooza or the familial air of the Philadelphia Folk Festival. And there was no attempt to create an era-defining experience a la Woodstock. But Sunday's HORDE (Horizons of Rock Developing Everywhere) Festival - a traveling gypsy caravan of jam-happy musicians and neo-hippy hucksters - featured full sets by Allman Brothers Band and Blues Traveler, and truncated sets by Big Head Todd and the Monsters, the Screaming Cheetah Wheelies, God Street Wine, Rusted Root and others.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 6, 2015 | By A.D. Amorosi, For The Inquirer
Beyond an always ferocious, soul-stirring approach to guitar mastery, there's one thing longtime devotees of Gov't Mule and Warren Haynes have come to expect: the unexpected. Whatever twists are possible, Haynes will make them. The Southern-fried bluesman and his tactile, roaring quartet Gov't Mule give fans shows whose second sets ripple with cover versions. Most recently, whole sets of AC/DC and Neil Young songs have speckled their set list. Friday at Upper Darby's Tower Theater, the Mule stuffed songs by Tom Waits, Little Feat, the Bee Gees, Steppenwolf into that night's catalog.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 5, 2016 | By A.D. Amorosi, For The Inquirer
The beginning-of-the-year blues isn't a mournful thing in the hands of Warren Haynes' Gov't Mule. For several years, the stormy guitarist-vocalist and his tight, stalwart crew have taken on forlorn blues in the matter of rural, three-chord marches along with wildly progressive jam-rock thunderbolts and snorting R&B reverie. The same was true at the top of 2016 at Upper Darby's Tower Theater on Saturday as Gov't Mule charmed a crowd of Haynes Heads shouting "Yah Mule" in celebration of their heroes.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 26, 2000 | By Dan DeLuca, INQUIRER MUSIC CRITIC
First, the bad news. Ratdog, the Bob Weir-Rob Wasserman Grateful Dead outgrowth that put on a listless performance in 1999, is back headlining the Jam on the River on Saturday. And the Memorial Day weekend music fete is shrinking: This year, there are two stages instead of three, and Jam stalwart Beausoleil avec Michael Doucet, scheduled for Sunday and Monday afternoons, is the only act playing multiple sets. Finally, the best days of the Sunday-night headliners - the Neville Brothers - are behind them.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 8, 2004 | By Tom Moon INQUIRER MUSIC CRITIC
No single band could replace Phish in the heart of Hacky Sack Nation. But several outfits that have built solid reputations in the jam world are poised to fill the void. Gov't Mule. Through his work with the Allman Brothers and as a guest on countless projects - including The Deep End, the all-star summit he organized - Warren Haynes has earned as much goodwill from jam-loving scenesters as any guitarist ever could. He returns next month with a slightly reconfigured Gov't Mule, and an album, Deja Voodoo, loaded with positively blistering guitar work.
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ENTERTAINMENT
January 5, 2016 | By A.D. Amorosi, For The Inquirer
The beginning-of-the-year blues isn't a mournful thing in the hands of Warren Haynes' Gov't Mule. For several years, the stormy guitarist-vocalist and his tight, stalwart crew have taken on forlorn blues in the matter of rural, three-chord marches along with wildly progressive jam-rock thunderbolts and snorting R&B reverie. The same was true at the top of 2016 at Upper Darby's Tower Theater on Saturday as Gov't Mule charmed a crowd of Haynes Heads shouting "Yah Mule" in celebration of their heroes.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 3, 2015 | By A.D. Amorosi, For The Inquirer
Warren Haynes, who is to perform Friday at Tower Theater, is the blisteringly emotive guitarist behind Gov't Mule. He has done a lengthy tour of duty with the Allman Brothers, and he has a lot of solo work to his credit, including 2011's Man in Motion . Last time in Philly, in 2013, he was coming through with his Jerry Garcia Symphonic Celebration. "I know those guys and believe they pay tribute to Jerry while making their own way," Haynes says of Trey Anastasio and John Meyer, two guitarists who interpreted Garcia's classic lines while working this year with the Dead's leftovers.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 6, 2015 | By A.D. Amorosi, For The Inquirer
Beyond an always ferocious, soul-stirring approach to guitar mastery, there's one thing longtime devotees of Gov't Mule and Warren Haynes have come to expect: the unexpected. Whatever twists are possible, Haynes will make them. The Southern-fried bluesman and his tactile, roaring quartet Gov't Mule give fans shows whose second sets ripple with cover versions. Most recently, whole sets of AC/DC and Neil Young songs have speckled their set list. Friday at Upper Darby's Tower Theater, the Mule stuffed songs by Tom Waits, Little Feat, the Bee Gees, Steppenwolf into that night's catalog.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 31, 2013 | By A.D. Amorosi, For The Inquirer
Warren Haynes has been in dozens of musical scenarios since starting his career in the 1980s as a combustible guitar-slinging sideman and front person. He's been a brother within the Allmans' framework, performed with orchestras, and acted as a sessioneer to the diverse likes of Dave Matthews, John Scofield, David Allan Coe, and more. His dense and blustery Gov't Mule put him at the top of the heap of hard-jamming blues players and collaborators. But it was playing with the Dead (once Grateful)
ENTERTAINMENT
June 26, 2013 | By A.D. Amorosi, For The Inquirer
When guitar god Warren Haynes executes the Jerry Garcia Symphonic Celebration with the Pittsburgh Symphony Orchestra at the Mann Center on Tuesday, he's not just honoring the late Grateful Dead guitarist. Performing with the orchestra, Haynes will inaugurate this summer's crossover-classical season at the Mann. That classical music hybrid is one of the performing arts center's most successful on-going events, pairing various symphonies (including the Philadelphia Orchestra) with performers outside the orchestral norm.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 25, 2013 | BY JONATHAN TAKIFF, Daily News Staff Writer takiffj@phillynews.com, 215-854-5960
WARREN Haynes didn't pick up a violin and pursue a career in classical music. He chose the electric guitar and the path of jam-band rock and southern-fried blues. He wound up working the world's stages with his own group, Gov't Mule, and also filling the very big shoes of guitar legends Jerry Garcia and Duane Allman in later iterations of the Grateful Dead and the Allman Brothers Band. But now this busy guy says he's thrilled and delighted to be part of a push by warm-weather music venues, like the Mann Center for the Performing Arts, to broaden their core subscription audience beyond the traditionally "classical music" program with more populist productions.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 29, 2012
Film New this week: Not Fade Away (*** out of four stars) Suburban New Jersey in the 1960s is carefully recreated by "Sopranos" auteur David Chase. John Magaro is great as Douglas, a gawky teen who finds confidence in his rock band. James Gandolfini, also of "The Sopranos," is the often-exasperated dad. A sprawling, often well-done tale. It's a hit. Rated R. . - Steven Rea Music Gov't Mule Formed as an Allman Brothers offshoot in 1994, Gov't Mule, which plays Dec. 28 and 29 at the Tower Theater, has kept its vigor and roadworthiness, becoming a much-followed jam band, due in large part to front man Warren Haynes.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 28, 2012 | By Nicole Pensiero, For The Inquirer
Gov't Mule has such a massive catalog of songs that front man Warren Haynes says it's unlikely the band will repeat any of them during its two-night run at the Tower Theater. In fact, he says, it's possible that none of the songs played in Philly will even make their way to New York's Beacon Theatre for the quartet's two-night stand there. "It's literally hundreds of songs," the soft-spoken guitarist and singer said. "We usually go for three hours or so. It ends up being a long night, but you're pleasantly exhausted at the end of it. " Based on the fact that Haynes is a full-time member of both Gov't Mule and the Allman Brothers Band - and has a solo career - you'd expect him to be, uh, pleasantly exhausted offstage, too. But the musician, 52, whose controlled intensity nabbed him the No. 23 spot on Rolling Stone's "100 Greatest Guitarists" list, says he is quite energized by his musical path.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 8, 2004 | By Tom Moon INQUIRER MUSIC CRITIC
No single band could replace Phish in the heart of Hacky Sack Nation. But several outfits that have built solid reputations in the jam world are poised to fill the void. Gov't Mule. Through his work with the Allman Brothers and as a guest on countless projects - including The Deep End, the all-star summit he organized - Warren Haynes has earned as much goodwill from jam-loving scenesters as any guitarist ever could. He returns next month with a slightly reconfigured Gov't Mule, and an album, Deja Voodoo, loaded with positively blistering guitar work.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 26, 2000 | By Dan DeLuca, INQUIRER MUSIC CRITIC
First, the bad news. Ratdog, the Bob Weir-Rob Wasserman Grateful Dead outgrowth that put on a listless performance in 1999, is back headlining the Jam on the River on Saturday. And the Memorial Day weekend music fete is shrinking: This year, there are two stages instead of three, and Jam stalwart Beausoleil avec Michael Doucet, scheduled for Sunday and Monday afternoons, is the only act playing multiple sets. Finally, the best days of the Sunday-night headliners - the Neville Brothers - are behind them.
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