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NEWS
August 4, 1990 | By Magdalena Pawlicki and Maciej Pawlicki, Special to The Inquirer
The elderly, gray-haired man dropped his umbrella and stood petrified in amazement as the bizarre entourage strutted down Jerozolimskie Avenue. A young woman laughed and embraced the group's leader as her boyfriend clicked a picture of something the likes of which had never been seen in Warsaw before. "My God, are they Martians?" the woman asked. "If they are, then Mars must be a wonderful place. " Philadelphia's Mummers marched around Poland's capital yesterday with the mix of pomp and frivolity they display on Broad Street on New Year's Day. The Polish-American String Band marched through Warsaw to crown their 13- day tour of Poland, their dazzling silver, blue and red costumes enlivening the scene in front of the city's central train station.
SPORTS
June 3, 2004 | By Joe Santoliquito INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
Some horses can sense when a different rider is aboard. That could be the case for Warsaw, a Polish stallion. Still, Callan Solem was able to control the horse in winning the hit and hurry jumper event last night at the 108th annual Devon Horse Show. "Warsaw has never been ridden by a girl before," said Solem, who achieved her first jumper-class victory at Devon. "He's hard for me to control, but in this class [a speed class], I could just let him go. " Laura Chapot, riding Samantha, took third in the event to remain in the lead for the open-jumper title.
NEWS
June 7, 1989 | By Mike Leary, Inquirer Staff Writer
The jostling crowd on the sidewalk in front of the shop on Potocka Street cared little about Solidarity's victory at the polls. They were concerned about shoes - sneakers to be exact - that the shop, an outlet for the private Sofix company, was selling. "The line started forming on Saturday - before the election," said a middle-age woman. Now, it was two days after the vote and still the people were waiting. "Solidarity will not make these lines go away," said the woman. "Things will probably even get worse before they improve, that's what I think.
NEWS
March 1, 1992 | By Jon Volkmer, SPECIAL TO THE INQUIRER
My friends and I marveled at the appointments of the new Belvedere Restaurant. Here we were, in the dead of winter, sitting amid giant ferns inside an elegant greenhouse - the Orangerie of Polish Kings - in the middle of Lazienkowski Park in the heart of Warsaw. The linen, the silver, the candles were a study in elegance, and the menu prices made us blink and smile. Veal, duck, pork and beef dishes with delicious-sounding descriptions (in English) were mostly under $10. I was mightily pleased.
SPORTS
January 6, 1997 | by Ted Silary, Daily News Sports Writer
You are 18 years old - today, in fact - and your head is spinning. It has been doing so for several months and the rate of revolutions per minute is getting outrageous. Bart Kuzniarz, a 6-7 senior forward on Archbishop Carroll High's 13-0 basketball team, is honored that the University of Pennsylvania has offered him a spot in its prestigious Wharton School of Business. He just might snatch it, too. In time . . . In time. In three years at Carroll, Kuzniarz has worked hard enough at his studies to earn nothing but first honors in the classroom and raise his score on the Scholastic Assessment Test to 1,290.
BUSINESS
March 15, 1993 | By Tom Belden, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Traveling and doing business in much of Eastern Europe has undoubtedly become less complicated and more rewarding since the fall of the Berlin Wall in 1989. But it's a lot easier in some cities than others, according to executives recently interviewed by American Express Co. Based on interviews with officials of 126 U.S., British, German, Austrian, Italian, French and Japanese companies, American Express found that the companies were most active in four Eastern European cities: Budapest, Prague, Moscow and Warsaw.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 15, 1997 | By Daniel Webster, INQUIRER MUSIC CRITIC
This city is full of the ghosts of murdered war victims, and violinist David Arben came here to confront his own. Yesterday, he played in the only synagogue left in Warsaw. Arben, the only member of his family to escape the Holocaust, survived six concentration camps because of his early gift with the violin. Still a teenager, he was freed by American troops in 1945, and eventually made his way to America to study at the Curtis Institute of Music and to make a career, mostly in the Philadelphia Orchestra.
NEWS
May 10, 2013 | By David Patrick Stearns, Inquirer Music Critic
Now that the Kimmel Center has disassembled the imaginary time machine that long dominated its lobby, the Gershman Y across the street has something closer to the real thing: The reconstituted 1918 film The Yellow Ticket , which was partly filmed in the later-razed Warsaw ghetto and was one of the first cinematic exposés of anti-Semitism. Now on a multicity tour with a live score by violinist Alicia Svigals, founder of the Klezmatics, The Yellow Ticket will be shown at 8 p.m. Thursday (copresented by the National Museum of American Jewish History)
NEWS
January 19, 2000 | By Joseph A. Slobodzian, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
It was a brilliantly clear sunny day in May 1943, Samuel Hilton remembered, a day made for children to play outside after a Polish winter. Hilton, then 13, was outside with his father. But they were lying face down on the cobblestoned square of the Platz Murznowski, hands clasped behind their heads as Nazi guards stood over them and hundreds of other Jews flushed out of the rubble of Warsaw's Jewish ghetto. "Tata," Hilton recalled saying to his father in Yiddish, "what did I do that I should die now?
NEWS
June 9, 2011
Stefan Kurylowicz, 62, a Polish architect who helped modernize Warsaw in the two decades after the collapse of communism, was among four Poles killed Monday when their two small planes crashed in Spain, an associate said Tuesday. Mr. Kurylowicz (pronounced Kur-eh-WOH-vich ) was "a Renaissance man," the Polish news agency PAP said. Born in Warsaw in 1949, he helped shape the capital as it evolved from a city dominated by drab communist-era architecture to a modern city dotted with tall glass and steel structures - some of the architect's creation.
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NEWS
May 23, 2013 | By Vanessa Gera, Associated Press
WARSAW, Poland - Boruch Spiegel, 93, one of the last remaining survivors of the 1943 Warsaw ghetto uprising by poorly armed Jewish insurgents against the powerful Nazi German force that occupied Poland, has died. Mr. Spiegel died May 9 in Montreal, where he had spent the last four years in a nursing home, his son, Julius, said Tuesday. With Mr. Spiegel's death, the tiny group of survivors of the legendary World War II revolt that was crushed 70 years ago this month grows even smaller.
NEWS
May 10, 2013 | By David Patrick Stearns, Inquirer Music Critic
Now that the Kimmel Center has disassembled the imaginary time machine that long dominated its lobby, the Gershman Y across the street has something closer to the real thing: The reconstituted 1918 film The Yellow Ticket , which was partly filmed in the later-razed Warsaw ghetto and was one of the first cinematic exposés of anti-Semitism. Now on a multicity tour with a live score by violinist Alicia Svigals, founder of the Klezmatics, The Yellow Ticket will be shown at 8 p.m. Thursday (copresented by the National Museum of American Jewish History)
NEWS
April 20, 2013
Venezuelan's rough start CARACAS, Venezuela - Inauguration day didn't go well for the man picked to lead Venezuela's socialist revolution for the next six years. Hours before his swearing-in, fellow South American leaders pushed President Nicolas Maduro into a concession allowing a full audit of the razor-thin vote that the opposition says he won by fraud. Then the massive crowds that used to pack the streets for late leader Hugo Chavez failed to appear. Finally, a spectator rushed the stage and interrupted Maduro's inaugural speech, shouting into the microphone before he was tackled by security in an embarrassing gaffe.
NEWS
April 7, 2013 | By Walter F. Naedele, Inquirer Staff Writer
  The two West Chester University graduates were in a Warsaw hotel lobby late one afternoon in May 2012 when they were told of an antiques shop in an old neighborhood. "It was a shop that carried a mixture of Judaica and Nazi paraphernalia," Hilary Bentman said last week. An odd mix. But in the early evening, she and Hadassah DeJack went there. The Christian shopkeeper, whose grandparents had hidden Jews during World War II, asked if they would like to see a section of a Torah rescued from the Nazi occupation.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 3, 2013 | By Tirdad Derakhshani, Inquirer Staff Writer
Warsaw in 1937 was a city full of intrigue. A city crawling with spies. A city on the brink of war. Its story is told in BBC America's superb, gorgeously shot mini-series Spies of Warsaw , which premieres Wednesday. It's one of two major new TV dramas this week, along with Rogue , a gritty, violent cop series from DirectTV's Audience Network, which also begins Wednesday, with a feature-length pilot. Spies of Warsaw is a lush, classic spy yarn starring David Tennant ( Doctor Who , Hamlet )
NEWS
December 30, 2012 | By Vanessa Gera, Associated Press
WARSAW, Poland - A statue of Adolf Hitler praying on his knees is on display in the former Warsaw Ghetto, the place where so many Jews were killed or sent to their deaths by Hitler's regime, and it is provoking mixed reactions. The work, HIM , by Italian artist Maurizio Cattelan, has drawn many visitors since it was installed last month. It is visible only from a distance, and the artist doesn't make explicit what Hitler is praying for, but the broader point, organizers say, is to make people reflect on the nature of evil.
NEWS
June 9, 2011
Stefan Kurylowicz, 62, a Polish architect who helped modernize Warsaw in the two decades after the collapse of communism, was among four Poles killed Monday when their two small planes crashed in Spain, an associate said Tuesday. Mr. Kurylowicz (pronounced Kur-eh-WOH-vich ) was "a Renaissance man," the Polish news agency PAP said. Born in Warsaw in 1949, he helped shape the capital as it evolved from a city dominated by drab communist-era architecture to a modern city dotted with tall glass and steel structures - some of the architect's creation.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 15, 2010 | By Steven Rea, Inquirer Movie Critic
A canister of film on a shelf in a bunker in the German woods, an archive of Nazi propaganda, discovered after World War II. A label on the canister: " Das Ghetto . " In the extraordinary, powerful, disturbing A Film Unfinished , much of the footage from that reel, shot in May 1942 in the Jewish Ghetto of Warsaw, is replayed - and revisited with the knowledge that it was a lie. Directed by an unknown Nazi official, who deployed cameramen...
ENTERTAINMENT
July 17, 2009 | HOWARD GENSLER Daily News wire services contributed to this report
TRAGEDY STRUCK Madonna's "Sticky & Sweet" tour in France yesterday as the roof of a stage being built for her concert at Marseille's Stade Velodrome collapsed, leaving one worker dead, two in serious condition and four others with fractures. Maurice Di Nocera, of Marseille's local government, said on France-Info radio that the roof had been about two-thirds complete and that it collapsed gradually. "Since it did not collapse right away, that allowed several people to get out, to avoid being hit," he said.
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