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Warsaw Ghetto

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NEWS
May 23, 2013 | By Vanessa Gera, Associated Press
WARSAW, Poland - Boruch Spiegel, 93, one of the last remaining survivors of the 1943 Warsaw ghetto uprising by poorly armed Jewish insurgents against the powerful Nazi German force that occupied Poland, has died. Mr. Spiegel died May 9 in Montreal, where he had spent the last four years in a nursing home, his son, Julius, said Tuesday. With Mr. Spiegel's death, the tiny group of survivors of the legendary World War II revolt that was crushed 70 years ago this month grows even smaller.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 15, 2010 | By Steven Rea, Inquirer Movie Critic
A canister of film on a shelf in a bunker in the German woods, an archive of Nazi propaganda, discovered after World War II. A label on the canister: " Das Ghetto . " In the extraordinary, powerful, disturbing A Film Unfinished , much of the footage from that reel, shot in May 1942 in the Jewish Ghetto of Warsaw, is replayed - and revisited with the knowledge that it was a lie. Directed by an unknown Nazi official, who deployed cameramen...
NEWS
April 19, 1993 | By Reid Kanaley, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Edith Millman remembered the sky over the walled, 200-square-block Jewish ghetto in Nazi-occupied Warsaw. "The sky was black with fires; they just burned everything down," Millman, now of Willow Grove, recalled of the bitter, 27-day Jewish uprising that began 50 years ago today as German soldiers moved in, intent on finally making Poland's capital city "Jewish-free. " About 3,000 people, many of them Holocaust survivors, gathered to commemorate the anniversary yesterday at the Monument to the Six Million Jewish Martyrs, the haunting sculpture of twisted limbs and flames erected 29 years ago at 16th Street and the Parkway.
NEWS
March 23, 2003 | By Valerie Reed INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
Poking around a Lambertville flea market six years ago, artist Ed Adams stopped, mesmerized by the faces before him. Staring back at him from worn, unlined ledger paper were the expressive eyes of pensive men. One with a Jewish star on his clothing. Another holding a young boy's hand. Another man in prayer. These were among the 13 pencil drawings at a vendor's table. "What attracted me was the quality of the drawings," Adams said. "When I heard the background from the vendor, they completely haunted me. " Adams was told that the drawings came from the Warsaw Ghetto and made their way to the United States by a family that knew the artist.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 9, 1994 | By Julia M. Klein, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
On Sept. 19, 1941, in violation of army orders, an otherwise unexceptional middle-aged German soldier entered the Warsaw Ghetto and photographed the mixture of horror and struggle that he saw there. Sgt. Heinz Jost's photographic foray, conducted on his birthday, produced 129 graphic images and several enduring mysteries: What was his initial motivation? How was his view of the Nazi mission altered by this close encounter with its devastating effects? Why did he keep the pictures to himself for more than 40 years, and why did he finally offer them to the world?
NEWS
April 8, 2013 | By Aron Heller, Associated Press
JERUSALEM - Israel dedicated its annual memorial day for the six million Jews killed in the Holocaust to mark 70 years since the Warsaw ghetto uprising, a symbol of Jewish resistance against the Nazis in World War II that resonates deeply in Israel to this day. At the opening ceremony at nightfall, President Shimon Peres and Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu both linked the desperate Jewish revolt of 1943 to the warrior mentality that enabled the...
NEWS
April 28, 2003 | By Matthew P. Blanchard INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
"URGENT! To all Ghetto Inhabitants! Resettlement means Treblinka and Treblinka means Death. Defy the Enemy, Defend Yourself and Your Family. Attack the Enemy with Whatever you have, Even with your Bare Fists. " If the new measure of modern massacre is Sept. 11, consider for a moment the Warsaw Ghetto in 1943, where 400,000 Polish Jews were herded into the tenements of the city's Jewish quarter with little idea the Nazis planned to simply slaughter them all. Then alarming leaflets such as the one above appeared on buildings and gates.
NEWS
November 24, 2012
Vladka Meed, 90, a courier and weapons smuggler for the Jewish resistance in Poland during World War II who published a harrowing early chronicle of the Warsaw ghetto uprising, died Nov. 21 at her daughter's home in Paradise Valley, Ariz. The death was confirmed by her son, Steven Meed. The cause was Alzheimer's disease. Mrs. Meed was born Feigel Peltel in Warsaw on Dec. 29, 1921. After Germany invaded Poland in 1939, she and hundreds of thousands of other Jews were systematically rounded up and forced into a squalid Warsaw ghetto of one-square mile.
NEWS
January 19, 2000 | by Jim Smith, Daily News Staff Writer
A survivor of the Warsaw Ghetto yesterday told a federal judge about Nazi atrocities as seen through the eyes of a 14-year old Jewish boy. But Samuel Hilton, now 70, couldn't identify Fedir Kwoczak, a retired Philadelphia construction worker, as one of the guards who brutalized and killed Jews in Hilton's hometown or other places in Poland during World War II. At times in tears, Hilton, of Scottsdale, Ariz., an accountant, recalled how the Nazis and their Russian and Ukrainian guards turned his native Warsaw into a slaughter pit in 1943.
NEWS
May 23, 1990 | By Peter Finn, Special to The Inquirer
In another time and place Irene might have taken piano lessons from Annetta Lockhart, a Cherry Hill composer. But not even Irene's second name survives and all that remains of her short and horror-filled life are a few poems she wrote chronicling her existence in the Warsaw ghetto before she met her death at Auschwitz. Lockhart is concerned that even those shards of memory, and the memory of millions of other lives lost in the Holocaust, seem to be receding with the passage of time.
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NEWS
May 23, 2013 | By Vanessa Gera, Associated Press
WARSAW, Poland - Boruch Spiegel, 93, one of the last remaining survivors of the 1943 Warsaw ghetto uprising by poorly armed Jewish insurgents against the powerful Nazi German force that occupied Poland, has died. Mr. Spiegel died May 9 in Montreal, where he had spent the last four years in a nursing home, his son, Julius, said Tuesday. With Mr. Spiegel's death, the tiny group of survivors of the legendary World War II revolt that was crushed 70 years ago this month grows even smaller.
NEWS
April 8, 2013 | By Aron Heller, Associated Press
JERUSALEM - Israel dedicated its annual memorial day for the six million Jews killed in the Holocaust to mark 70 years since the Warsaw ghetto uprising, a symbol of Jewish resistance against the Nazis in World War II that resonates deeply in Israel to this day. At the opening ceremony at nightfall, President Shimon Peres and Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu both linked the desperate Jewish revolt of 1943 to the warrior mentality that enabled the...
NEWS
November 24, 2012
Vladka Meed, 90, a courier and weapons smuggler for the Jewish resistance in Poland during World War II who published a harrowing early chronicle of the Warsaw ghetto uprising, died Nov. 21 at her daughter's home in Paradise Valley, Ariz. The death was confirmed by her son, Steven Meed. The cause was Alzheimer's disease. Mrs. Meed was born Feigel Peltel in Warsaw on Dec. 29, 1921. After Germany invaded Poland in 1939, she and hundreds of thousands of other Jews were systematically rounded up and forced into a squalid Warsaw ghetto of one-square mile.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 15, 2010 | By Steven Rea, Inquirer Movie Critic
A canister of film on a shelf in a bunker in the German woods, an archive of Nazi propaganda, discovered after World War II. A label on the canister: " Das Ghetto . " In the extraordinary, powerful, disturbing A Film Unfinished , much of the footage from that reel, shot in May 1942 in the Jewish Ghetto of Warsaw, is replayed - and revisited with the knowledge that it was a lie. Directed by an unknown Nazi official, who deployed cameramen...
NEWS
April 28, 2003 | By Matthew P. Blanchard INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
"URGENT! To all Ghetto Inhabitants! Resettlement means Treblinka and Treblinka means Death. Defy the Enemy, Defend Yourself and Your Family. Attack the Enemy with Whatever you have, Even with your Bare Fists. " If the new measure of modern massacre is Sept. 11, consider for a moment the Warsaw Ghetto in 1943, where 400,000 Polish Jews were herded into the tenements of the city's Jewish quarter with little idea the Nazis planned to simply slaughter them all. Then alarming leaflets such as the one above appeared on buildings and gates.
NEWS
March 23, 2003 | By Valerie Reed INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
Poking around a Lambertville flea market six years ago, artist Ed Adams stopped, mesmerized by the faces before him. Staring back at him from worn, unlined ledger paper were the expressive eyes of pensive men. One with a Jewish star on his clothing. Another holding a young boy's hand. Another man in prayer. These were among the 13 pencil drawings at a vendor's table. "What attracted me was the quality of the drawings," Adams said. "When I heard the background from the vendor, they completely haunted me. " Adams was told that the drawings came from the Warsaw Ghetto and made their way to the United States by a family that knew the artist.
NEWS
January 19, 2000 | By Joseph A. Slobodzian, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
It was a brilliantly clear sunny day in May 1943, Samuel Hilton remembered, a day made for children to play outside after a Polish winter. Hilton, then 13, was outside with his father. But they were lying face down on the cobblestoned square of the Platz Murznowski, hands clasped behind their heads as Nazi guards stood over them and hundreds of other Jews flushed out of the rubble of Warsaw's Jewish ghetto. "Tata," Hilton recalled saying to his father in Yiddish, "what did I do that I should die now?
NEWS
January 19, 2000 | by Jim Smith, Daily News Staff Writer
A survivor of the Warsaw Ghetto yesterday told a federal judge about Nazi atrocities as seen through the eyes of a 14-year old Jewish boy. But Samuel Hilton, now 70, couldn't identify Fedir Kwoczak, a retired Philadelphia construction worker, as one of the guards who brutalized and killed Jews in Hilton's hometown or other places in Poland during World War II. At times in tears, Hilton, of Scottsdale, Ariz., an accountant, recalled how the Nazis and their Russian and Ukrainian guards turned his native Warsaw into a slaughter pit in 1943.
NEWS
April 20, 1998 | By Monica Yant, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Rain may have forced them inside, but it did not drench the spirit of members of Philadelphia's Jewish community, gathering yesterday to remember their six million martyrs killed during the Holocaust. "Lighting these candles," said Stefanie Seltzer, who survived the Holocaust as a child, "we vow never to forget the beauty and dignity of their lives, even as we remember the cruelty of their death. " Though the tribute was timed to coincide with the 55th anniversary of the Warsaw Ghetto uprising, participants also noted another milestone - the somewhat bittersweet 50th anniversary of the state of Israel.
NEWS
November 5, 1997 | By Bridget Eklund, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Ruth Altbeker Cyprys' daughters had long suspected that her experiences during World War II had something to do with her often austere demeanor. But not until she died in 1979, when they began sorting through the belongings in her London home, did they find out the whole truth. In a desk drawer, they found two tattered brown envelopes filled with pages of a journal in which their mother detailed her unimaginable suffering and extraordinary courage. "Every page has something amazing to say about her," said Cyprys' niece, Joan Wider of Springfield.
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