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Washington Monument

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NEWS
October 2, 2011 | By Ben Nuckols, Associated Press
WASHINGTON - Emma Cardini never envisioned herself rappelling down the sides of buildings. She's a civil engineer, not a thrill-seeker. But for a second straight day last week she was a high-wire celebrity and object of fascination for tourists as she made her way up and down the east face of the Washington Monument to document earthquake damage. Cardini, 32, is part of the four-person "difficult access team" using harnesses and ropes to traverse the exterior of the monument and test each individual stone.
NEWS
October 15, 1995 | By Donald D. Groff, FOR THE INQUIRER
One of Washington's enduring summertime scenes - the winding line around the base of the Washington Monument - could fade into history with a new timed-ticket procedure to be tested there beginning this week. The National Park Service plans to begin issuing tickets on Tuesday with a time stamped on them. Once visitors have a ticket, they show up at their appointed time to take the 70-second elevator ride to the top of the popular monument. The park service estimates the wait under the new procedure will be no more than 15 minutes, compared with the two- to three-hour wait common in the summer.
NEWS
May 26, 1999 | By Mike Madden, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
Both functional and decorative, the scaffolding that has covered the Washington Monument since last summer has drawn raves from tourists, residents and architectural critics alike. During the day, the sun glints off the 37 miles of aluminum tubes that cover the 555-foot obelisk. A fine blue mesh overlaid on the metal keeps the workers who scurry around repairing and restoring the monument hidden. At night, bright lights strung throughout the scaffolding cast a shadowy pattern on the famous shrine to the father of the republic.
NEWS
February 23, 2002 | By Inga Saffron INQUIRER ARCHITECTURE CRITIC
With memories of the Sept. 11 terrorist attacks still in the nation's mind, the National Park Service cautiously reopened a refurbished Washington Monument yesterday, declaring that it would endure as a symbol of democratic freedom. During the four-year repair project, the monument's marble facade was burnished to a brilliant ivory and its interior was given speedy, glass-front elevator cabs. But because of heightened security concerns, a temporary entrance for screening visitors became a key feature of the $10.5 million overhaul.
NEWS
August 19, 1999 | By Seth Borenstein, INQUIRER WASHINGTON BUREAU
In this city of spin and scandal, up-to-date satellite technology proved yesterday that at least one institution remains rock-solid: The Washington Monument. While official Washington fence-straddles and shifts positions regularly, the massive obelisk hasn't moved, settled or swayed an inch since it was completed in December 1884, new government satellite-based measurements show. Seeking to give the monument "a space-age address," surveyors from the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration are spending the week using global positioning satellite equipment to determine its precise location.
NEWS
October 13, 1996 | The Philadelphia Inquirer / APRIL SAUL
"Gepetto" fixes a panel of the AIDS Memorial Quilt, stretched out below the Washington Monument, where it will stay over the weekend. It has 36,000 panels, each the size of a grave. During events, the names of 70,000 AIDS victims will be called out.
NEWS
April 18, 2012 | By David J. Unger, MEDILL NEWS SERVICE
WASHINGTON - Retired space shuttle Discovery streaked across the sky one last time Tuesday, piggybacking on a modified Boeing 747 jetliner to Washington Dulles International Airport as it headed for its final resting place: the Smithsonian Institution. "It's a once-in-a-lifetime opportunity," said Caroline Boucher, who was visiting from Bangor, Pa. Tourists and locals gathered on the National Mall, on rooftops and at other sites around the nation's capital to see the historic shuttle in flight before it goes on permanent display at the National Air and Space Museum's Steven F. Udvar-Hazy Center in Chantilly, Va. A 7-year-old boy dressed as an astronaut posed for pictures as his sister stomped on a toy air pump, firing a foam rocket into the air. Bystanders gazed with binoculars, pointing and taking photos as the conjoined crafts took a tandem flight over Washington at an altitude of 1,500 feet - less than three times the height of the Washington Monument - perfect for viewing.
NEWS
February 14, 1987
Hey! What's all the fuss about paying admission to see the Liberty Bell and Valley Forge? Have you been to Washington lately? Tickets to the White House are $2, or $5 for the "early-bird" tour (available only with a coupon from your congressman); $10 if you want to see the President awake and thinking. Admissions at the Capitol: House gallery $2, Senate gallery $3. Want to visit your representative or senator? Interviews are $2.50 per minute or fraction thereof (after all, that's about what a doctor charges)
NEWS
May 30, 2010
Philadelphia is home to several monuments dedicated to the men and women who died while in military service, including the Tomb of the Unknown Soldier, located in Washington Square. In 1682, William Penn's surveyor, Thomas Holme, laid out the city grid to include five planned squares, one of which was Southeast Square at Locust and Sixth Streets. For much of the 18th century, this square was a grazing land and a potter's field. During the Revolutionary War, it was used as a burial ground for fallen colonial soldiers.
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NEWS
October 14, 2013
In 1777, George Washington's bedraggled Continental Army hunkered down at Valley Forge for a winter that one in five would not survive. In marking the centennial of that season, the Philadelphia lawyer Henry Armitt Brown alluded to the 23d Psalm, calling the former encampment "this valley of the shadow of that death out of which the life of America rose. " The nation born of that struggle is now struggling to marshal its vast resources to maintain Valley Forge as a swath of lightly staffed open space.
NEWS
June 17, 2013 | By Jonathan Tamari, Inquirer Washington Bureau
WASHINGTON - Whenever Kyle Blasy took his girlfriend to a place with a great view, he joked that it would be a good spot to propose. The Jenkintown native did it at Fort McHenry in Baltimore, at historic Williamsburg, Va., and when he and Nora Przybylowski went hiking in Pennypack Preserve. So when Blasy repeated their running joke atop the U.S. Capitol dome Monday morning, Przybylowski didn't think much of it. Only this time, Blasy had a ring and was on one knee, about 220 feet above the base of the Capitol, with stunning views of the National Mall and Washington Monument.
NEWS
June 13, 2013 | By Lonnae O'Neal Parker, Washington Post
WASHINGTON - Philanthropist and media mogul Oprah Winfrey is donating $12 million to the Smithsonian's National Museum of African American History and Culture, officials announced Tuesday. Combined with the $1 million she gave in 2007, it is the museum's largest donation. In recognition, Winfrey's name will go on a 350-seat theater. The chairwoman and chief executive of the Oprah Winfrey Network has been a member of the museum's advisory council since 2004. "I am so proud of African American history and its contributions to our nation as a whole," Winfrey said in a statement.
NEWS
January 23, 2013 | By Calvin Woodward, Associated Press
WASHINGTON - It was altogether a more intimate affair than four years ago. Just a party of untold hundred thousands, chilling in the nation's backyard. President Obama's inauguration Monday brought out a festive crowd of flag-wavers who filled the National Mall to overflowing, hailed his moment with lusty cheers and spent their down time spotting celebrities amid the bunting. No match for the staggering masses and adrenaline-pumping energy of his first turn as president on the west front of the Capitol.
BUSINESS
December 19, 2012
In the Region New CEO at Royal Bank Royal Bank America 's parent company, Royal Bancshares of Pennsylvania Inc. , of Narberth, named F. Kevin Tylus its president and chief executive officer, effective immediately. Robert R. Tabas, the CEO since 2009, will retire from day-to-day management but remains as chairman, the bank said. Tylus was president of Mercer County, N.J.-based Yardville National Bank when it was acquired in 2007 by PNC Financial Services Group Inc. , which made him a regional president.
NEWS
April 18, 2012 | By David J. Unger, MEDILL NEWS SERVICE
WASHINGTON - Retired space shuttle Discovery streaked across the sky one last time Tuesday, piggybacking on a modified Boeing 747 jetliner to Washington Dulles International Airport as it headed for its final resting place: the Smithsonian Institution. "It's a once-in-a-lifetime opportunity," said Caroline Boucher, who was visiting from Bangor, Pa. Tourists and locals gathered on the National Mall, on rooftops and at other sites around the nation's capital to see the historic shuttle in flight before it goes on permanent display at the National Air and Space Museum's Steven F. Udvar-Hazy Center in Chantilly, Va. A 7-year-old boy dressed as an astronaut posed for pictures as his sister stomped on a toy air pump, firing a foam rocket into the air. Bystanders gazed with binoculars, pointing and taking photos as the conjoined crafts took a tandem flight over Washington at an altitude of 1,500 feet - less than three times the height of the Washington Monument - perfect for viewing.
NEWS
January 20, 2012
Storm paralyzes Washington state SEATTLE - A monster Pacific Northwest storm coated the Seattle area in a thick layer of ice Thursday and brought much of Washington state to a standstill, sending hundreds of cars spinning out of control, temporarily shutting down Sea-Tac Airport and knocking down so many trees that members of the Washington State Patrol brought chain saws to work. Oregon experienced torrential rain that swept away a car from a grocery store parking lot, killing a mother and her 1-year-old son. East of Seattle, a man was killed by a falling tree, authorities said.
NEWS
December 23, 2011 | By Ben Nuckols, Associated Press
WASHINGTON - The earthquake-damaged Washington Monument has extensive cracking and chipped stones near its peak that have left it highly vulnerable to rainfall, and inspectors found cracks and loose stones along the entire length of the 555-foot structure, according to a report released Thursday by the National Park Service. The report was prepared by the engineering firm whose employees rappelled down the sides of the monument in September to inspect the damage. It offers the most detailed portrait yet of the condition of the 127-year-old monument, which has been closed to visitors since a 5.8-magnitude quake shook the nation's capital on Aug. 23. The report does not estimate how long repairs would take or how much they would cost.
NEWS
October 2, 2011 | By Ben Nuckols, Associated Press
WASHINGTON - Emma Cardini never envisioned herself rappelling down the sides of buildings. She's a civil engineer, not a thrill-seeker. But for a second straight day last week she was a high-wire celebrity and object of fascination for tourists as she made her way up and down the east face of the Washington Monument to document earthquake damage. Cardini, 32, is part of the four-person "difficult access team" using harnesses and ropes to traverse the exterior of the monument and test each individual stone.
NEWS
September 29, 2011 | By Ben Nuckols, Associated Press
WASHINGTON - In what looked like a scene from a Hollywood action movie, an elite team of professionals rappelled down the Washington Monument on Wednesday - not to carry out a covert mission but to inspect the damage done to the 555-foot marble obelisk by last month's earthquake. As tourists squinted at the tiny figures, two men and two women climbed from a hatch and observation windows at the top of the monument and slowly began lowering themselves with ropes and harnesses down its pyramid-shaped cap, where a large, inch-wide crack was located and where they expected to find the most damage.
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