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NEWS
August 7, 1992 | BY JACK MCKINNEY
It is no longer a question of whether the Washington Post has double standards. It's a question of which person or what criterion determines when and for whose possible benefit, or detriment, the double standards are applied. Maybe it violates some unwritten code of print journalism to point this out, but what the Post did Tuesday to a black woman it suspects of being the undocumented offspring of longtime segregationist Strom Thurmond was dirty and unconscionable. As a paper that fancies itself in the vanguard of Eastern liberalism, you can understand the Post wanting to take a shot at the ancient conservative Republican senator from South Carolina.
FOOD
October 11, 2012
AMY KIM / Washington Post
ENTERTAINMENT
September 17, 2013
HE MAY be unassuming and bookish, but Washington Post reporter Wil Haygood is a rock star. His 2008 article about a black White House employee who served under eight U.S. presidents inspired the hit movie "The Butler," starring Forest Whitaker and Oprah Winfrey. I'm in awe of Haygood because of what he has accomplished: By telling the story of Eugene Allen, who worked as a butler at the White House under eight administrations for three decades, Haygood pays homage to all the nameless people in service industries who for decades toiled in obscurity, often enduring the worst kind of racial indignities, while making things happen in the halls of power.
NEWS
October 9, 2013
An illustration that accompanied the "PhillyDeals" column Sunday and referenced Tiger Management, the New York hedge fund group, depicted an unrelated company with a similar name. A Washington Post story published Sunday incorrectly said the FBI had offered a $5 million bounty for information that led to the capture of Nazih Abdul-Hamed al-Ruqai, a suspected al-Qaeda figure. The bounty was offered by the State Department through its "Rewards for Justice" program.
NEWS
March 16, 2013
Murrey Marder, 93, a Washington Post reporter whose tenacious coverage of Joseph McCarthy's anti-communist crusade foreshadowed the senator's downfall and disgrace, died March 11 at the Washington Home hospice. The cause was complications from a stroke last month, said his nephew Steve Marder. Mr. Marder's career spanned nearly eight decades, including World War II service in the South Pacific as a Marine Corps combat correspondent. He joined the Washington Post in 1946 and distinguished himself on the so-called Red Beat, the sensational trials and hearings about the alleged communist infiltration of government, Hollywood, and other industries.
NEWS
July 19, 2012
Peter N. Kyros, a Democrat who represented Portland, Maine, in the U.S. House for four terms, died July 10 - the day before his 87th birthday - at George Washington University Hospital of respiratory failure. Kyros was a lawyer in private practice in Portland before serving in the House from 1967 to 1975. In Congress, he helped oversee legislation involving conservation and wildlife protection, and he promoted the passage of a law establishing a 200-mile offshore commercial fishing boundary.
NEWS
February 6, 1991
DON'T BLAME THE SYSTEM Governments, like clocks, go from the motion men give them; and as governments are made and moved by men, so by them are ruined too; wherefore governments rather depend upon men, than men upon governments. - William Penn, preface to The Frame of Government of Pennsylvania, 1682 IN THE WAR BALLET, YOU GET THE POINT The analysts write about war as if it's a ballet . . . What I always say to those folks is, "Yes, it's choreographed, and what happens is the orchestra starts playing and some son of a bitch climbs out of the orchestra pit with a bayonet and starts chasing you around the stage.
SPORTS
September 28, 2014
THE NFL FINED Eagles left tackle Jason Peters $10,000 for "unnecessarily striking an opponent in the head area after the play was over" in the game against the Redskins, the league confirmed yesterday. Washington's Chris Baker, whom Peters went after in the wake of the defensive lineman's blindside hit on Nick Foles, was fined $8,268 for grabbing an opponent's facemask. Baker was not fined for his questionable hit on Foles, a hotly debated topic in Philadelphia all week. Troy Vincent, the NFL's executive vice president of football operations, told the Washington Post on Tuesday that the hit was legal.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
November 16, 2014
ISSUE | FAMILIES Lifestyle choice Instead of using prominent space on Page 3 to inform us of anything going on in the world, The Inquirer tells us about a woman with terminal cancer - with whom I do sympathize - who wants children, pursues in-vitro fertilization, has her cousin carry and birth the twins, and states that she will not let cancer make her life choices ("Starting a family against odds," Nov. 9). And when we pro-lifers gather in Washington in the hundreds of thousands to ask for the repeal of a law that would allow more children the chance to be born, we barely get a sentence.
NEWS
November 7, 2014 | BY JASON NARK, Daily News Staff Writer| narkj@phillynews.com, 215-854-5916
THE VOTERS may still believe in U.S. Rep. Chaka Fattah, but another member of his inner circle has bailed from the net closing in around him. Now Tom Lindenfeld, a Washington, D.C., political consultant, may help investigators land Fattah in an ongoing public-corruption probe. One day after Fattah collected 87 percent of the vote to win his 11th term in the 2nd District, Lindenfeld, 59, pleaded guilty to wire fraud in U.S. District Court in connection with an illegal $1 million loan he funneled into Fattah's failed 2007 mayoral bid. As part of the plea deal, Lindenfeld agreed to cooperate in the investigation linked to Fattah - who has not been charged - and to testify at trial if necessary.
SPORTS
September 28, 2014
THE NFL FINED Eagles left tackle Jason Peters $10,000 for "unnecessarily striking an opponent in the head area after the play was over" in the game against the Redskins, the league confirmed yesterday. Washington's Chris Baker, whom Peters went after in the wake of the defensive lineman's blindside hit on Nick Foles, was fined $8,268 for grabbing an opponent's facemask. Baker was not fined for his questionable hit on Foles, a hotly debated topic in Philadelphia all week. Troy Vincent, the NFL's executive vice president of football operations, told the Washington Post on Tuesday that the hit was legal.
SPORTS
September 26, 2014 | BY LES BOWEN, Daily News Staff Writer bowenl@phillynews.com
IT COMES DOWN to this: To embrace the NFL's ruling that Washington's Chris Baker "did nothing wrong" in his blindside flattening of Nick Foles on Sunday, you have to embrace the idea that Foles was trying to tackle Bashaud Breeland when Baker hit him. That was the stance taken by NFL executive vice president of football operations Troy Vincent, in one of a trio of tweets aimed at explaining his rationale yesterday afternoon. On Tuesday, Vincent told the Washington Post that Baker should not have been penalized for the hit that started a brawl and led to the ejections of Baker and Eagles tackle Jason Peters.
SPORTS
September 21, 2014 | By Bob Brookover, Inquirer Columnist
ASHBURN, Va. - For better or worse, Kirk Cousins is the Washington Redskins quarterback for the near future. Whether that is better or worse for the Eagles Sunday at Lincoln Financial Field depends on who you ask. It became the hottest debate among Washington football fans last week when Robert Griffin III exited in the first quarter of a game against Jacksonville on Sunday with a dislocated left ankle. Cousins made an auspicious entrance by throwing his first pass for a 20-yard touchdown.
NEWS
July 4, 2014 | By Susan Snyder, Inquirer Staff Writer
Pennsylvania State University, which is under federal scrutiny for its handling of sexual assault cases, is creating a task force to better investigate and prevent such incidents on campus, the president announced Wednesday. In an e-mail to Penn State staff, president Eric J. Barron said "we are confident" that the university's policies comply with Title IX, the law that prohibits discrimination on the basis of sex and requires universities to investigate sexual assaults. "However," he wrote, "I do not believe that we should be satisfied with compliance - instead we should become a true leader in the prevention of sexual assault and in investigating and adjudicating student-on-student sexual assault cases while best protecting the wishes, and where appropriate and possible, the confidentiality of the survivors.
NEWS
February 27, 2014 | By Michael Matza, Inquirer Staff Writer
WASHINGTON - Long before he was the publisher and a principal owner of the Washington Post, Donald Graham was a beat cop in a low-income precinct. "I rode around [Washington] and dealt with a lot of people who were troubled," he recalled last week. And he asked himself: "What could help?" His conclusion: "College graduation is still the thing that creates the greatest likelihood of mobility for people with no assets. " Over the years, Graham, 68, who left the Post when it was sold in October, used his wealth and influence to create scholarships for Washington students.
NEWS
October 9, 2013
An illustration that accompanied the "PhillyDeals" column Sunday and referenced Tiger Management, the New York hedge fund group, depicted an unrelated company with a similar name. A Washington Post story published Sunday incorrectly said the FBI had offered a $5 million bounty for information that led to the capture of Nazih Abdul-Hamed al-Ruqai, a suspected al-Qaeda figure. The bounty was offered by the State Department through its "Rewards for Justice" program.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 17, 2013
HE MAY be unassuming and bookish, but Washington Post reporter Wil Haygood is a rock star. His 2008 article about a black White House employee who served under eight U.S. presidents inspired the hit movie "The Butler," starring Forest Whitaker and Oprah Winfrey. I'm in awe of Haygood because of what he has accomplished: By telling the story of Eugene Allen, who worked as a butler at the White House under eight administrations for three decades, Haygood pays homage to all the nameless people in service industries who for decades toiled in obscurity, often enduring the worst kind of racial indignities, while making things happen in the halls of power.
NEWS
August 9, 2013
THIS WEEK, I came to understand the many employees who've experienced dread when their companies are sold. The Washington Post , where I work, is being taken over by Amazon.com founder and chief executive Jeff Bezos. After hearing the news during a company meeting, the first thing I did was call my husband. "Honey, you won't believe . . . ," I started. I didn't get a chance to finish my sentence. He already knew about the sale because the Post app on his iPhone had sent him a news alert.
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