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NEWS
August 7, 1992 | BY JACK MCKINNEY
It is no longer a question of whether the Washington Post has double standards. It's a question of which person or what criterion determines when and for whose possible benefit, or detriment, the double standards are applied. Maybe it violates some unwritten code of print journalism to point this out, but what the Post did Tuesday to a black woman it suspects of being the undocumented offspring of longtime segregationist Strom Thurmond was dirty and unconscionable. As a paper that fancies itself in the vanguard of Eastern liberalism, you can understand the Post wanting to take a shot at the ancient conservative Republican senator from South Carolina.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 14, 2016 | By Lini S. Kadaba, For The Inquirer
Evan Birnholz sits in a sunny corner of his Center City brick walk-up and clicks on a 21-square grid that dominates his HP computer screen. He types in names of people with states in them. You know, like Hannah Montana, or Duncan Idaho. "It's anything that comes to my imagination," says the recently appointed crossword constructor for the Washington Post's Sunday edition - a gig that places him among the elite of newspaper cruciverbalists. Who would have thought an undergraduate chemistry major who, as a child, struggled to comprehend puns - the meat and potatoes of any crossword - would end up a top puzzle writer?
NEWS
May 9, 2016 | By Julie Shaw, Staff Writer
An olive-complexioned, curly-haired University of Pennsylvania economics professor was deeply focused while scribbling an algebraic equation Thursday night, waiting aboard an American Airlines flight scheduled to take off from Philadelphia to Syracuse, N.Y. He didn't have time to talk to the passenger next to him - a blond-haired woman wearing flip-flops who appeared to be in her 30s. His behavior, his looks, and the little that he said to...
FOOD
October 11, 2012
AMY KIM / Washington Post
NEWS
May 2, 2016 | By Jenice Armstrong
THE ANNOUNCEMENT by former U.S. Sen. Harris Wofford (D, Pa.) that he would marry again Saturday at age 90, this time to a man 50 years his junior, hit the Web like another naked Kim Kardashian selfie. As someone who once interviewed Wofford, I was as shocked as anyone. The news didn't break the Internet, but the venerable Democrat, who worked with the Rev. Martin Luther King Jr. and helped start the Peace Corps, got people talking. His relationship challenges traditional notions of heterosexuality and of love.
SPORTS
October 9, 2015 | By Jake Kaplan, Inquirer Staff Writer
A decade before he began a promising professional baseball career with the New York Mets, Michael Conforto was afforded a lens into his father's athletic past. It came during an off day from the 2004 Little League World Series, when the team from Redmond, Wash., made the hourlong drive southwest to State College. With his father leading the way, the star 11-year-old and his teammates hung out on the sidelines of a Penn State football practice and were granted an audience with coach Joe Paterno.
NEWS
August 2, 2016
Chris Costner Sizemore, 89, whose life with multiple-personality disorder became the basis for the best-selling The Three Faces of Eve , died of a heart attack July 24 at a hospice center in Ocala, Fla., said her son, Bobby Sizemore. She became one of the most famous Americans of the 1950s but under the disguised name. The Three Faces of Eve , which paints Ms. Sizemore as an anguished Southern wife and mother who battles for control of her own mind, sold hundreds of thousands of copies.
NEWS
February 5, 2016 | By David Patrick Stearns, CLASSICAL MUSIC CRITIC
Gunshots rang out backstage at the Academy of Music. Yet Opera Philadelphia's leading baritone, Jarrett Ott, kept talking as if nothing had happened. "That's pretty typical for us," he explained. "Gun practice. " The opera is Jennifer Higdon's Cold Mountain , and the academy's production opens Friday. Excitement is high: A week before opening, ticket sales already had surpassed those of both Oscar and Ainadamar (new operas from previous seasons). It's an adaptation of the Charles Frazier novel about Civil War Confederate deserter W.P. Inman.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
August 2, 2016
Chris Costner Sizemore, 89, whose life with multiple-personality disorder became the basis for the best-selling The Three Faces of Eve , died of a heart attack July 24 at a hospice center in Ocala, Fla., said her son, Bobby Sizemore. She became one of the most famous Americans of the 1950s but under the disguised name. The Three Faces of Eve , which paints Ms. Sizemore as an anguished Southern wife and mother who battles for control of her own mind, sold hundreds of thousands of copies.
NEWS
July 27, 2016
Fred Ward, 81, a Washington photographer who captured memorable images of the funeral of President John F. Kennedy and the Beatles' first American concert and who traveled the world on assignment for National Geographic magazine, died Tuesday at his home in Malibu, Calif. He had Alzheimer's disease, said his wife, Charlotte Ward. On his first day in Washington in 1962, Mr. Ward parked his Volkswagen van in the White House driveway, bounded inside, and picked up his credentials as a photographer for Black Star photo agency.
NEWS
July 19, 2016
Carolyn See, 82, a memoirist and novelist whose writings captured the untamed world of California, where she spent her life, and her accumulated wisdom on moxie in the face of adversity, died Wednesday at a hospice center in Santa Monica, Calif. She had congestive heart failure, said daughter Lisa See. Ms. See was the author of 10 books, encompassing fiction and nonfiction, and was coauthor of several more. For 27 years, until her retirement in 2014, she was a regular book reviewer for the Washington Post.
NEWS
June 14, 2016
By Jonathan Capehart One year after celebrating the most joyous pride month in U.S. history with the Supreme Court ruling that legalized same-sex marriage in this country, the lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender (LGBT) community and the nation as a whole are now in mourning. As of this writing, at least 50 people are dead and 53 were injured when a madman unleashed hell inside a gay nightclub in the wee hours of Sunday. This is by far the worst mass shooting in American history.
NEWS
May 9, 2016 | By Julie Shaw, Staff Writer
An olive-complexioned, curly-haired University of Pennsylvania economics professor was deeply focused while scribbling an algebraic equation Thursday night, waiting aboard an American Airlines flight scheduled to take off from Philadelphia to Syracuse, N.Y. He didn't have time to talk to the passenger next to him - a blond-haired woman wearing flip-flops who appeared to be in her 30s. His behavior, his looks, and the little that he said to...
NEWS
May 2, 2016 | By Jenice Armstrong
THE ANNOUNCEMENT by former U.S. Sen. Harris Wofford (D, Pa.) that he would marry again Saturday at age 90, this time to a man 50 years his junior, hit the Web like another naked Kim Kardashian selfie. As someone who once interviewed Wofford, I was as shocked as anyone. The news didn't break the Internet, but the venerable Democrat, who worked with the Rev. Martin Luther King Jr. and helped start the Peace Corps, got people talking. His relationship challenges traditional notions of heterosexuality and of love.
NEWS
April 20, 2016
Journalism Public service: The Associated Press, for a series of articles documenting the use of slave labor in the commercial seafood industry in Indonesia and Thailand. Breaking news reporting: Los Angeles Times staff, for coverage of the San Bernardino massacre and the ensuing investigation. Investigative reporting: Leonora LaPeter Anton and Anthony Cormier, of the Tampa Bay Times, and Michael Braga, of the Sarasota Herald-Tribune, for a project on escalating violence and neglect in Florida mental hospitals.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 14, 2016 | By Lini S. Kadaba, For The Inquirer
Evan Birnholz sits in a sunny corner of his Center City brick walk-up and clicks on a 21-square grid that dominates his HP computer screen. He types in names of people with states in them. You know, like Hannah Montana, or Duncan Idaho. "It's anything that comes to my imagination," says the recently appointed crossword constructor for the Washington Post's Sunday edition - a gig that places him among the elite of newspaper cruciverbalists. Who would have thought an undergraduate chemistry major who, as a child, struggled to comprehend puns - the meat and potatoes of any crossword - would end up a top puzzle writer?
NEWS
March 16, 2016 | Staff Reports
A police officer slain in an ambush attack near Washington, D.C., over the weekend grew up in Delaware County. Officer Jacai Colson, 28, died in a gun battle with a suspect who opened fire on the officer outside a Prince George's County police station. The four-year veteran of the Prince George's department was born in Boothwyn and graduated from Chichester High School, the Washington Post reported. He played football at Chichester and at Randolph Macon College in Virginia, according to a team roster.
NEWS
February 5, 2016 | By David Patrick Stearns, CLASSICAL MUSIC CRITIC
Gunshots rang out backstage at the Academy of Music. Yet Opera Philadelphia's leading baritone, Jarrett Ott, kept talking as if nothing had happened. "That's pretty typical for us," he explained. "Gun practice. " The opera is Jennifer Higdon's Cold Mountain , and the academy's production opens Friday. Excitement is high: A week before opening, ticket sales already had surpassed those of both Oscar and Ainadamar (new operas from previous seasons). It's an adaptation of the Charles Frazier novel about Civil War Confederate deserter W.P. Inman.
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