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NEWS
April 15, 2010 | MICHAEL SMERCONISH
FOR NOW, I'll leave it to others to speculate about the implications of Justice John Paul Stevens' retirement from the Supreme Court. I'm too focused on religion, wondering what's next for the WASPs. As pointed out by Adam Liptak in the New York Times, the court is about to lose its sole remaining representative of America's largest religion, Protestantism. Six Catholics and two Jews currently join Stevens on the bench. Among them are an African-American (Clarence Thomas), two Italian-Americans (Samuel Alito and Antonin Scalia)
NEWS
August 14, 1988 | By John Way Jennings, Inquirer Staff Writer
A swarm of wasps descended on a playground yesterday for the second time in a week, and Bordentown police closed the area and used a bullhorn to warn nearby residents to keep their children away. No one was reported stung. Sgt. Frederick Brown said neighbors called police shortly before 8:30 a.m. to report that bees had invaded the playground on Second Street near Mary Street. When officers arrived to investigate, they found more than 1,000 narrow- waisted, dark brown insects buzzing throughout the 100-square-feet playground area that houses swings and other equipment.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 26, 1987 | By Douglas J. Keating, Inquirer Staff Writer
Near the beginning of The Middle Ages, playwright A. R. Gurney stipulates the playing of the hymn "A Mighty Fortress Is Our God. " When E. Digby Baltzell read the play, mention of the venerable Protestant hymn brought to mind an image from his youth. "I can just see 400 kids in St. Paul's School, in that beautiful English chapel, singing that hymn," Baltzell said. Perhaps Gurney, too, saw those youthful singers in his mind's eye while he was writing The Middle Ages, which opens Wednesday in a Philadelphia Drama Guild production at the Annenberg Center.
NEWS
September 13, 1992 | By Jeff Donn, ASSOCIATED PRESS
Researchers at the University of Massachusetts are using a parasitic wasp to help control the spread of Lyme disease. Scientists said they had infected deer ticks for the first time with a tiny, parasitic wasp. The work on islands off the Massachusetts coast promises a natural, self-perpetuating way to help combat the potentially crippling disease, which afflicts at least 9,300 people around the country. People develop Lyme disease from the bite of deer ticks, which feed on human blood.
NEWS
August 4, 1988 | By Will Thompson, Inquirer Staff Writer
Thomas Reinke of Upper Providence was puzzled by all the little holes in a section of his front lawn. When he noticed that the holes had dwellers, he knew he had a problem. "I didn't know what to make of it, at first," he said. "Especially after I counted about 50 holes with neat little piles of dirt around them when I went out to mow the lawn. I discovered soon enough that the holes were homes of bees. " Now, he says, he's in something of a quandary. "I don't want to take the chance of mowing the lawn, because that might agitate them," Reinke said.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 21, 1990 | By Gary Thompson, Daily News Movie Critic
If you've ever looked at George Bush and wondered what kind of subculture could produce a man who prefers the nickname Poppy, the movie "Metropolitan" might provide a few answers. It's a small-scale comedy that examines a hive of young WASPs in one of their natural settings - Manhattan's Park Avenue. They are an endangered species, still clinging to obsolete notions of class, lineage and status in a world that is no longer paying attention. Their dwindling circle of pedigreed friends is so small that some of the debutantes have a hard time finding acceptable dates.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 26, 1989 | By John H. Richardson, Los Angeles Daily News
They wear pastels. They can't dance. They play golf. They definitely have no sense of rhythm. They're silly and selfish and spoiled. They're WASPs, the latest discovery in the movies' non-stop search for idiots and villains. It has been coming a long time, but in the wake of the big round of year- end film releases, the white Anglo-Saxon Protestant as cold, repressed fool has become so prevalent as to appear to be a cliche. But those depictions aren't likely to disappear anytime soon: they are too safe and convenient a target for filmmakers to give up on them.
NEWS
July 24, 1991 | By Cynthia J. McGroarty, Special to The Inquirer
Beneath the merciless sun, the street was deserted and quiet. Real quiet. From behind windows and doors, faces peered cautiously into the heat. It was high noon in Tinicum, and the residents were waiting, waiting for a guy who could take on the ruthless villains who had been terrorizing the neighborhood, a guy who could run them out of town, cut them down in cold blood. Instead of Gary Cooper, they got Township Commissioner Tom Giancristoforo. Instead of vowing to bring in the U.S. marshals to help clean up the town, he mentioned bringing in a consultant.
NEWS
August 31, 1995 | By Gwen Florio, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
"They're coming after people," said Stanley Lane, a Moorestown allergist who has treated seven people in the last two weeks for bad reactions. "They're very angry. They're vicious. " As the last gorgeous days of summer wind down, the heat wave may be gone, but all of a sudden the wasps are everywhere. They're fiercer than ever - the drought has them in a foul mood - and they're looking for any moisture they can find. Water your lawn? Expect winged, stinging company. Sweat in the sun?
NEWS
August 15, 1988 | By Laura Quinn, Inquirer Staff Writer
It won't make a good horror movie, after all. But wasps continued to disrupt life yesterday in a Bordentown neighborhood. Sgt. Frederick Brown of the Bordentown Police Department said things were quieter at a playground that had been closed Saturday after being overrun by a swarm of more than 1,000 of the insects. The playground was reopened yesterday. An unusually large number of wasps remained yesterday morning, but not as many as were there the day before. Nevertheless, parents in the immediate area continued to keep their children indoors during the morning.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
September 8, 2012 | By Alan J. Heavens, Inquirer Real Estate Writer
Memories of columns past came to mind as I read Consumer Reports' latest CFL-versus-LED lightbulb study, available in complete form in its October issue. Longtime readers may recall that I asked for feedback a couple of years ago on CFLs and received more than 1,000 e-mails from around the country. Consumer Reports says the biggest beef people have with CFLs and LEDs is the price, with 23 percent of those surveyed stating that they cost too much. CFLs can take minutes to achieve full brightness, compared with LEDs that brighten instantly, but in tests, one LED was dim and emitted a ghastly, bluish color, and others couldn't cast light in all directions.
NEWS
June 30, 2011
RE THE LETTER "A Worse Fate than the Irish, Diane," from James Webb Sr.: Mr. Webb, although your people may have been kidnapped, I remember learning that it was your own people that sold Africans into slavery. And just as your people suffered on ships coming to America, the ships to Ellis Island carrying the Irish weren't the Titanic. Many of these immigrants never survived the long trip. And imagine their surprise when they arrived in the Land of Opportunity to face help-wanted ads followed by "No Irish Need Apply.
NEWS
April 18, 2011
Violet Cowden, 94, a former president of the WASP veterans organization whose experiences and indomitable spirit inspired later generations of female pilots, died April 10 of congestive heart failure at Hoag Memorial Hospital Presbyterian in Newport Beach, Calif., said her daughter Kim Ruiz. Her passion for flying was born when she was a young girl envying the hawks soaring above her family's South Dakota farm in the 1920s. She learned to fly out of an airfield in Spearfish, S.D., while she was a young first-grade teacher in the early 1940s.
NEWS
July 30, 2010 | By Michael Martin Mills, Inquirer Columnist
Take note of standing water after downpours. Don't worry about lawns, but if such pools in flowerbeds don't drain promptly, be aware that the same situation will occur with heavy winter precipitation - and poor winter drainage can be quite bad for many perennials and shrubs. Mitigation may be in order. Cool off by perusing the bulb catalogs. Place orders immediately for such fall-bloomers as colchicum, fall crocus, lycoris. They need to get into the ground very soon, and supplies run out early.
NEWS
April 15, 2010 | MICHAEL SMERCONISH
FOR NOW, I'll leave it to others to speculate about the implications of Justice John Paul Stevens' retirement from the Supreme Court. I'm too focused on religion, wondering what's next for the WASPs. As pointed out by Adam Liptak in the New York Times, the court is about to lose its sole remaining representative of America's largest religion, Protestantism. Six Catholics and two Jews currently join Stevens on the bench. Among them are an African-American (Clarence Thomas), two Italian-Americans (Samuel Alito and Antonin Scalia)
NEWS
August 29, 2006 | By Dawn Fallik INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Kelly Gidzinski spends most of August hiding inside her Clifton Heights house. It's not the heat, it's not the humidity; it's the invasion of the Eastern cicada killer wasps. Like a bad B-horror flick, the two-inch-long insects appear every year, digging fist-size holes in her backyard, sending the Delaware County mother of two scurrying from car to house. This year has been one of the busiest for the cicada killer wasps, said Chuck Holliday, a biology professor at Lafayette College who studies them.
NEWS
March 20, 2005 | By Cynthia J. McGroarty INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
When Mary Holmes Howson was killed during pilot training at Avenger Field in Texas in 1944, Deanie Parrish was devastated by the loss of her friend. But just as regrettable, Parrish recalled by telephone recently from her Florida home, was the way the military treated Howson's death. As a member of the WASP - Women Airforce Service Pilots - Howson, who hailed from Wayne, was not entitled to a military funeral or any of the other benefits given to male pilots. "We couldn't even put an American flag on her coffin," Parrish said.
NEWS
December 26, 2004 | By Michael E. Bratsis FOR THE INQUIRER
My wife and I arrived at our cabana on this island's western beach at Sac Bajo too late to go snorkeling, so we decided to stop at the palapa bar by the ocean and then take a long walk to watch the sun set over the Bahia de Mujeres. This was three years ago. Jackie was five months pregnant with Maia, and our other two children, Alex and Angel, were back in Wallingford, Pa., with their grandparents. We expected the five nights on the quiet, tiny island off the tip of the Yucatan to be our last hurrah for quite a while.
FOOD
July 10, 2003 | By Dianna Marder INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Devika Mansukhani of Voorhees just married off the last of her brood in a ceremony followed by an elaborate Hindu wedding banquet. With apologies to the political correctness police, she says some nuptial stereotypes are rooted in reality. "At weddings, you try to please everybody," says Mansukhani, a biochemist born in Karachi and raised in Bombay. "And you want to have plenty. " We're talking overabundance - tables groaning with breads and cake, fruit and game - savory and sweet signs that the harvest was good and the hosts aren't worried about where their next meal is coming from.
NEWS
February 4, 2003 | By J.T. Barbarese
Age 7. My brother and I are called "Chinks" by some kids on our block, children of an ex-Navy man who probably sponged up the then-routine habit of referring to all Asians as "Japs" or "Chinks. " They do it glibly, without malice. Something vaguely Asian in our bone structure and our black hair makes us look "Oriental" to them. We will be confused with Asians or Native Americans into our late teens. Sixteen. The 1960s. I'm in a classroom in a private school I attend only because my godmother died childless and over-insured.
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