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NEWS
January 30, 2007
DID anyone besides me see the irony in the president's visit to DuPont last week? He traveled from D.C. to Wilmington, barely 100 miles. A motorcade could have made the trip in maybe 90 minutes and only cost the taxpayers 150 to 200 gallons of gas. But he flew Air Force One. The irony: He went there to talk about energy conservation! Bob Johnson Warminster
NEWS
August 17, 2006
SHRINKING the state Legislature? That's an idea whose time came long ago. Philadelphia is covered by a total of 35 state reps and senators, yet only 17 City Council members. Take the state population, 11 million, divide by 203 state reps and 50 state senators. That's one legislator for each 43,000 residents. Now take the city population of 1.5 million and divide by 16 council members. You get about 94,000. Why not eliminate 15-20 folks from the Harrisburg trough and turn that money back to us in the city?
NEWS
July 28, 2010
I fully appreciate Emily Mendell's problem with forgetting to bring environmentally friendly bags to the store ("If green is to be ingrained, we need better role models," Sunday).  In Taiwan, you simply pay for the plastic bag if you want one. Are Americans ready for even such a mild solution? I think Mendell and others want to blame  the government, BP, and just about anyone but themselves. Americans are  willing to ask for solutions from others and, yet, fail to ask the tough questions of themselves.
NEWS
June 11, 1986
It's nice to see that the City of Philadelphia is wasting tens of thousands of dollars in taxpayers' money to rid the streets of the dangerous and dreaded "johns. " It is hard to comprehend that several police officers are involved in a type of crime where there are no victims and no assailants, only two people who are conducting a business transaction that is legal in some parts of our country. The only real crime is that the john involved in the transactions does not pay the standard 6 percent sales tax for the service.
SPORTS
May 14, 1996 | by Paul Hagen, Daily News Sports Writer
"Waste not, want not. " - Anonymous It has been abundantly clear from the beginning of spring training that the Phillies were not the sort of team that could spill chances to win, toss them casually out the window like candy wrappers, otherwise fritter them away. Specifically, strong outings by starting pitchers were to be savored like a fine cognac. That is a commandment, however, that has been routinely disobeyed by the local nine to this point of the season. Seven times in the first 36 games the Phillies have gotten a quality start - at least six innings, three or fewer earned runs allowed - and still lost.
NEWS
April 24, 1986 | By S.E. Siebert, Special to The Inquirer
With reluctance, the Whitpain Board of Supervisors has approved the first aerial waste-disposal system in the township for a two-lot subdivision at 600 Morris Rd. Last month, property owner Donald Brady asked for permission to subdivide his six-acre tract. Because the property could not support a septic system and there was no public sewer on the site, he also asked for permission to install an aerial spray waste system. The spray waste system would use chemicals to treat the waste.
NEWS
July 5, 1988 | By Douglas Pike, Inquirer Editorial Board
It's always in season for people to seethe at the waste of their hard- earned dollars. Right now there is the federal probe into an alleged black market in inside dope about fat Pentagon contracts. There's the new agreement that for safety reasons a $5 billion nuclear plant on Long Island will never operate. And, no matter when, "welfare cheats" always make some taxpayers grind their teeth. Although even ill-gotten gains are cycled through the economy, "waste" is a fair label any time the public's money gets spent without producing the intended benefit.
NEWS
December 4, 1997 | by Ramona Smith, Daily News Staff Writer
America's No. 1 trash picker has a few things to say about the holidays. Loosely translated, they add up to something like, "Bah, humbug!" William Rathje, an archaeologist who specializes in garbage, looks on the time from now until New Year's as the season to be wasteful. "You wrap all these things, and you put all these gewgaws and froufrous all over them," he says. "You buy people all these presents that they don't want. " And those cards. "There are literally hundreds of millions, if not billions, of Christmas cards that are mailed every year - and everything that you can do to cut down that list is significant.
NEWS
April 26, 1990 | By Ramona Smith, Daily News Staff Writer
The city has a new toxic avenger. His mission: to make the city less safe for organized grime. Kim Hollaender, who was named yesterday as environmental prosecutor in the district attorney's office, said he planned to target not only illegal dumping but any "corrupt organizations" found to release "dangerous, deadly substances" into the environment. Hollaender, an assistant district attorney named to the new assignment by District Attorney Ronald D. Castille, noted that organized crime has often been linked to the waste disposal business.
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BUSINESS
August 1, 2016 | By Diane Mastrull, Staff Writer
The location is North Philadelphia, far from the cutting-edge labs of some of the city's edgiest start-ups inhabiting the University City Science Center, or the suburbs' pharmaceutical companies along the Route 202 corridor. But it's home to a fast-growing, innovative manufacturer offering solutions to the health-care industry and job opportunities to veterans and others whose backgrounds make it hard to find work. DiSorb Systems Inc. is a veteran- owned company of 18 employees at 18th Street and West Indiana Avenue that makes products that solidify and disinfect blood and other liquid medical waste for safe and cost-effective disposal by hospitals and surgical centers.
NEWS
July 31, 2016
The Secret War Spies, Ciphers, and Guerrillas By Max Hastings Harper. 640 pp. $35 Reviewed by Paul Jablow At first glance, Joseph Rochefort was about as unlikely as a war hero gets. A mediocre (at best) naval officer, he narrowly escaped court martial when a destroyer on which he was the duty officer dragged its anchor in San Francisco bay amid six destroyers. He was transferred to cryptoanalysis when fellow officers noted his penchant for crossword puzzles and bridge.
NEWS
July 17, 2016 | By Olivia Exstrum, Staff Writer
Think of it as Uber for leftovers. Instead of ordering a personal ride, imagine a lift to run unused meals to a local food bank. The Food Connect app, launched Friday by Food Connect and other local antihunger organizations, was created as a solution to the massive food waste anticipated during the Democratic National Convention. The app is available for download on iTunes and the Google Play store. Starting Saturday, restaurants, caterers, and anyone who has food to donate can download the app, enter their location and a pickup time, and have their extra food picked up by a car, van, or truck, depending on the size of the donation.
NEWS
June 3, 2016
ISSUE | CAMPAIGN 2016 A wasted vote I did not serve in the military. I did not lose a son or daughter who did. I am at an age when I can recognize that I am not erudite or wise enough to describe or understand what that might be like, and that I won't last the years required to learn. But I have learned this much: Bereft families do not stand over the graves of their fallen telling them that they wasted their time. Come November, we will all be called to serve. Forget Hillary Clinton and every other white-noise name you see. There is only one name that matters.
NEWS
May 26, 2016 | By Justine McDaniel, Staff Writer
After a public uproar over Elcon Recycling Services' plans to build a hazardous-waste treatment plant near the Delaware River in Falls Township, Bucks County, the proposal has yet to move forward. Elcon is two months behind a self-imposed schedule to submit the next part of its application to the state. On Monday, three months after a raucous meeting that drew a crowd of 300, the company would not say when the application would be ready. Representatives said it was still a work in progress.
NEWS
April 23, 2016
The fossil-fuel lobby's desperate defense of the largest source of anthropogenic carbon pollution, coal-fired electricity plants, could choke Pennsylvania's efforts to tailor federal pollution control efforts to the state's needs and take advantage of more promising energy resources. Instead of helping people who depend on coal for power and a living make the transition to cleaner, more sustainable energy sources and jobs, industry leaders are trying to stall President Obama's Clean Power Plan, which aims to reduce carbon dioxide emissions from coal-fired plants to 32 percent below 2005 levels by 2030.
SPORTS
April 6, 2016
'LET'S GO. Let's go. Push it. " During his 241-game reign so far as head coach of the 76ers, coach Brett Brown has shouted those words to his players thousands of times. From the day he was hired in August of 2013, that is the style Brown felt would give his team its best chance to compete. He might be shouting those same words to management come the end of the season. Brown has won just 46 of those 241 games, and has never been given a roster with a chance to succeed. It is understandable if Brown's words to management this offseason are the same as they have been to his players: "Let's go. Let's go. Push it. " Because, quite frankly, this third year of The Process has been a complete waste.
NEWS
March 22, 2016
ISSUE | SPECIAL ELECTIONS Better to save money and get a larger turnout Special Pennsylvania House elections last week produced the wasteful spending and low turnout associated with such votes on days other than primary or general election days ("Democrats easily win Pa. House special elections," Wednesday). Such elections cost taxpayers hundreds of thousands of dollars. The turnout for two special elections in Philadelphia was less than 10 percent, while 16 percent voted in an election in Westmoreland County.
NEWS
March 11, 2016 | By Carolyn Hax
Adapted from a recent online discussion.   Question: My mother and mother-in-law are both awful at gift-giving, for me, my children, my husband. Wrong size (after asking and being told the correct sizes), awful choices on color, style - most of their gifts are promptly donated to charity, after profuse appreciation and thanks, of course. My mother-in-law has given my college kid a gift certificate for a restaurant that her college town, where she lives year-round, does not have.
NEWS
March 6, 2016
Almost $3 billion a year in expensive cancer drugs is wasted because their single-use packages contain more medication than is needed - and the leftover drug is thrown away for safety reasons, according to a new analysis by researchers. The study focused on 20 cancer drugs that are infused - administered intravenously or injected - at doctors' offices or hospitals. They come in doses based on patients' weights and body sizes, but often the doses are too large and the remainder is tossed out, the analysis found.
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