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NEWS
January 30, 2007
DID anyone besides me see the irony in the president's visit to DuPont last week? He traveled from D.C. to Wilmington, barely 100 miles. A motorcade could have made the trip in maybe 90 minutes and only cost the taxpayers 150 to 200 gallons of gas. But he flew Air Force One. The irony: He went there to talk about energy conservation! Bob Johnson Warminster
NEWS
August 17, 2006
SHRINKING the state Legislature? That's an idea whose time came long ago. Philadelphia is covered by a total of 35 state reps and senators, yet only 17 City Council members. Take the state population, 11 million, divide by 203 state reps and 50 state senators. That's one legislator for each 43,000 residents. Now take the city population of 1.5 million and divide by 16 council members. You get about 94,000. Why not eliminate 15-20 folks from the Harrisburg trough and turn that money back to us in the city?
NEWS
July 28, 2010
I fully appreciate Emily Mendell's problem with forgetting to bring environmentally friendly bags to the store ("If green is to be ingrained, we need better role models," Sunday).  In Taiwan, you simply pay for the plastic bag if you want one. Are Americans ready for even such a mild solution? I think Mendell and others want to blame  the government, BP, and just about anyone but themselves. Americans are  willing to ask for solutions from others and, yet, fail to ask the tough questions of themselves.
NEWS
June 11, 1986
It's nice to see that the City of Philadelphia is wasting tens of thousands of dollars in taxpayers' money to rid the streets of the dangerous and dreaded "johns. " It is hard to comprehend that several police officers are involved in a type of crime where there are no victims and no assailants, only two people who are conducting a business transaction that is legal in some parts of our country. The only real crime is that the john involved in the transactions does not pay the standard 6 percent sales tax for the service.
SPORTS
May 14, 1996 | by Paul Hagen, Daily News Sports Writer
"Waste not, want not. " - Anonymous It has been abundantly clear from the beginning of spring training that the Phillies were not the sort of team that could spill chances to win, toss them casually out the window like candy wrappers, otherwise fritter them away. Specifically, strong outings by starting pitchers were to be savored like a fine cognac. That is a commandment, however, that has been routinely disobeyed by the local nine to this point of the season. Seven times in the first 36 games the Phillies have gotten a quality start - at least six innings, three or fewer earned runs allowed - and still lost.
NEWS
April 24, 1986 | By S.E. Siebert, Special to The Inquirer
With reluctance, the Whitpain Board of Supervisors has approved the first aerial waste-disposal system in the township for a two-lot subdivision at 600 Morris Rd. Last month, property owner Donald Brady asked for permission to subdivide his six-acre tract. Because the property could not support a septic system and there was no public sewer on the site, he also asked for permission to install an aerial spray waste system. The spray waste system would use chemicals to treat the waste.
NEWS
July 5, 1988 | By Douglas Pike, Inquirer Editorial Board
It's always in season for people to seethe at the waste of their hard- earned dollars. Right now there is the federal probe into an alleged black market in inside dope about fat Pentagon contracts. There's the new agreement that for safety reasons a $5 billion nuclear plant on Long Island will never operate. And, no matter when, "welfare cheats" always make some taxpayers grind their teeth. Although even ill-gotten gains are cycled through the economy, "waste" is a fair label any time the public's money gets spent without producing the intended benefit.
NEWS
December 4, 1997 | by Ramona Smith, Daily News Staff Writer
America's No. 1 trash picker has a few things to say about the holidays. Loosely translated, they add up to something like, "Bah, humbug!" William Rathje, an archaeologist who specializes in garbage, looks on the time from now until New Year's as the season to be wasteful. "You wrap all these things, and you put all these gewgaws and froufrous all over them," he says. "You buy people all these presents that they don't want. " And those cards. "There are literally hundreds of millions, if not billions, of Christmas cards that are mailed every year - and everything that you can do to cut down that list is significant.
NEWS
April 26, 1990 | By Ramona Smith, Daily News Staff Writer
The city has a new toxic avenger. His mission: to make the city less safe for organized grime. Kim Hollaender, who was named yesterday as environmental prosecutor in the district attorney's office, said he planned to target not only illegal dumping but any "corrupt organizations" found to release "dangerous, deadly substances" into the environment. Hollaender, an assistant district attorney named to the new assignment by District Attorney Ronald D. Castille, noted that organized crime has often been linked to the waste disposal business.
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SPORTS
June 26, 2015 | By Bob Brookover, Inquirer Columnist
NEW YORK - Cole Hamels deserved better and he deserves better. After the Phillies put up 22 runs in their previous two games, the offense reverted to its 2015 form in the series finale Wednesday afternoon at Yankee Stadium. That meant no run support for the veteran lefthander who, by now, is used to that grim scenario. Hamels was also betrayed by his defense on this otherwise beautiful day in the Bronx. The box score said he allowed five earned runs on eight hits in five innings during the Phillies' 10-2 loss to the New York Yankees.
FOOD
June 26, 2015 | By Elisa Ludwig, For The Inquirer
The statistics would make anyone's grandmother cringe in shame. According to the Environmental Protection Agency, Americans jammed 35 million tons of food waste into landfills in 2013. Food waste leads to more greenhouse gases, which in turn contributes to climate change. Wasted food represents wasted resources and calories that hungry people could be eating. Another less significant but no less valid concern for serious cooks: It's tons of wasted flavor. Though the EPA has been pushing the idea that Americans should generate less waste at home through videos like "Feed People Not Landfills," new ideas about how restaurants, food-service providers, and stores can do the same are coming to the forefront.
NEWS
June 12, 2015 | BY BETH D'ADDONO, For the Daily News
YOU'VE HEARD it before and you'll hear it again: We are a country of food wasters, where groceries get purchased, go unused, expire and are then discarded. The trek from fridge to trash can is the new walk of shame. But it doesn't have to happen that way. According to the most recent data available from the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Americans threw away approximately 36 million tons of food in 2012, a 20 percent spike since 2000. That adds up to about 40 percent of our food, the equivalent of $165 billion each year, according to the Natural Resources Defense Council.
SPORTS
June 1, 2015 | By Bob Ford, Inquirer Columnist
Chip Kelly doesn't like wasting time. Whatever else we know about the Eagles coach as the preparations for his third NFL season begin, we know that much. He practices fast. He plays fast. He talks fast. If he wants to acquire a player or get rid of one, that doesn't take long, either. Kelly doesn't care for those who waste their own time, which is precisely what he thinks the league's competition committee did when it made a halfway alteration to the conversion-after-touchdown rule.
SPORTS
May 29, 2015 | By Matt Breen, Inquirer Staff Writer
NEW YORK - The bit of momentum built by the Phillies a week and a half ago officially dissipated Wednesday with a 7-0 loss to the Mets at Citi Field. The Phillies departed for their 10-day road trip riding a five-game winning streak. They return home as losers of four straight and seven of their last nine. The Phillies (19-30) are off to their worst start since 2000, when they finished 16 wins shy of a .500 record. Manager Ryne Sandberg said a four-game losing streak was not the way he wanted to finish the road trip, especially after opening it with a win. "We'll get back home," Sandberg said.
SPORTS
May 18, 2015 | By Frank Fitzpatrick, Inquirer Columnist
The disagreeable reminders hit quickly and sharply, like a well-aimed machine-gun burst. Peeking at the standings one morning last week. Talking at lunch a few hours later with an equally disillusioned friend. Turning on the game that night only to soon turn away. Everywhere I went, I encountered evidence of just how spiritually arid this summer of 2015 promises to be for Philadelphians. Everyone I spoke to voiced what has become the mantra of our shared misery: "The Phillies are so bad," it went, "that I can't watch anymore.
SPORTS
April 8, 2015 | By Sam Carchidi, Inquirer Staff Writer
After they play their final three games this week and then watch the playoffs on TV, the sad reality will hit the Flyers: They wasted a career season by goalie Steve Mason - despite what a certain NBC "analyst" says about him. Mason, who turns 27 next month and believes he has not yet reached his prime, has finally given the Flyers an elite goaltender. But despite his being among the NHL's leaders in save percentage and goals-against average, the team will miss the playoffs for the second time in three years.
NEWS
February 6, 2015 | By Andrew Maykuth, Inquirer Staff Writer
The Department of Environmental Protection on Wednesday rejected a controversial application for a Bucks County hazardous waste treatment facility because the business failed to demonstrate compliance with flood-hazard regulations. DEP said it denied Elcon Recycling Services' siting application for a proposed liquid hazardous waste treatment facility in the Keystone Industrial Port Complex in Falls Township, the former United States Steel Fairless Works site. The agency said that Elcon had not complied with its request to provide a hydrologic analysis, including any historical data, to demonstrate that the proposed site has not been flooded in the past.
NEWS
January 12, 2015 | By Sandy Bauers, For The Inquirer
When Paul Rozin was growing up, his parent thought food waste was terrible, telling him to "finish your food. Think of the starving children in Europe. " The psychology worked. "I would eat my food," he said. Now, Rozin is a cultural psychologist at the University of Pennsylvania, and one of his research areas is food attitudes. He spoke recently at the Last Food Mile, a national conference on food waste sponsored by the University of Pennsylvania School of Veterinary Medicine. Food waste happens all along the supply chain, from farms to stores to restaurants, but waste in the American home is the single largest component, with the average family of four discarding an estimated 1,164 pounds of food a year - about three pounds a day. A third of that is inedibles, such as chicken bones and orange peels.
NEWS
January 2, 2015
A FEW YEARS ago, NBA Hall-of-Famer Charles Barkley got into a lot of trouble for making the audacious observation that sports figures didn't need to be role models. Legions of fans and professional journalists (who are simply glorified fans with a byline) were outraged at this attack on the fundamental principle that the person who jumps highest must aim highest, the person who tackles the running back must also be able to tackle life's problems with grace, the person who hits it out of the park must swing for the cheap seats in real life as well.
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