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NEWS
June 4, 1989 | By Nancy Petersen, Special to The Inquirer
A consortium of Chester County's major environmental groups has declared that any further discharges of wastewater into the Brandywine Creek should be banned. The six-member consortium released a statement at Thursday night's meeting of the Downingtown Area Regional Authority's Phase III planning group that said critical problems would result from additional discharges to the creek. The problems include reductions in the creek's base flow, reduced groundwater recharge and depletion of the water resources of the Brandywine Valley.
BUSINESS
November 16, 2013 | By Andrew Maykuth, Inquirer Staff Writer
Hoist one for the Victory Brewing Co. The Pennsylvania Public Utility Commission on Thursday approved a discounted wastewater treatment rate that should save the Downingtown craft brewer about 21 percent on its monthly sewer bill at its new facility in western Chester County. The Pennsylvania American Water Co. asked the PUC to approve the special bulk rate now given to Arcelor Mittal, which operates a steel mill in Coatesville. The brewer will save about $1,836 off its estimated monthly sewer bill of $8,695 under the typical industrial rate.
NEWS
March 9, 2011 | By Andrew Maykuth, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The Pennsylvania Department of Environmental Protection's statistics on Marcellus Shale natural gas activity contain serious flaws and inconsistencies, and do not accurately report the volume of wastewater being reused in the industry's much-touted recycling efforts. The DEP's most recent statewide statistics on wastewater production overstate by nearly two times the amount of wastewater produced during the last six months of 2010 largely because one the 39 operators who filed reports last month inadvertently entered the wrong data in its forms.
NEWS
August 11, 2012
A man who worked at a Philadelphia industrial company was sentenced Friday in federal court to three years' probation for tampering with samples of wastewater that was discharged into the city's sewer system, prosecutors said. Peter Shtompil was a senior manager at Nupro Industries Corp., which manufactures oils and chemical compounds at a plant in Port Richmond. The company was required to monitor pollutants in its wastewater. Shtompil watered down samples and ordered other employees to do the same.
NEWS
August 17, 2010
A company drilling in the Marcellus Shale region in southwest Pennsylvania has been fined $97,350 for allowing "fracking" wastewater to overflow a pit and contaminate a watershed in Hopewell Township, Washington County. The state Department of Environmental Protection said that Atlas Resources L.L.C., a wholly owned subsidiary of Atlas Energy Inc., based in Moon Township, Allegheny County, corrected the problem once it was discovered. The wastewater was a by-product of hydraulic fracturing, or "fracking," during which millions of gallons of high-pressure water, sand, and chemicals are injected into a well to shatter the shale to release trapped natural gas. In this case, the state said in a release, an unknown amount of water overflowed and ran into a tributary of Dunkle Run. The problem was discovered Dec. 5 and 6. The company said that a water pump owned and operated by a contractor had activated improperly, and that the discharge consisted of about 90 percent fresh water and 10 recycled flowback water.
NEWS
February 16, 1992 | By Jaffer Ahmad, SPECIAL TO THE INQUIRER
This week, Oxford Borough will begin to make its case for turning a farm property into a vast field for spray irrigation of treated wastewater. Winning approval is essential for Oxford to turn its wastewater treatment system into a regional plant. Because the farm is in Lower Oxford Township, supervisors there will begin hearings Tuesday on the suitability of the 158-acre former Osborne farm. More hearings are set for Thursday, Feb. 25 and Feb. 27. The resumption of hearings became possible after the recent appointment of Ervin W. Lewis to Lower Oxford's three-member Board of Supervisors.
NEWS
April 20, 2011 | By Andrew Maykuth, Inquirer Staff Writer
Pennsylvania regulators on Tuesday called on Marcellus Shale natural gas drillers to stop sending wastewater to 15 treatment plants, citing an increased risk of contaminating public drinking water. The Department of Environmental Protection's action, while voluntary, will likely set the stage for a formal ban on the discharge of inadequately treated wastewater into the state's rivers. "Now is the time to take action to end this practice," acting DEP Secretary Michael Krancer said in a statement Tuesday.
NEWS
March 23, 2011 | By Andrew Maykuth, Inquirer Staff Writer
The level of salty compounds in the Monongahela River south of Pittsburgh spiked above acceptable limits in late 2008 - not a health risk, according to federal and state regulators, but drinking water drawn from the river tasted like mud. Environmentalists blamed the contamination on Marcellus Shale gas-drilling discharges. Natural-gas drillers pointed to other sources in the historically stressed river: pollutants from coal mines and other industrial discharges. Which source was to blame didn't really matter.
BUSINESS
January 5, 2011 | By Andrew Maykuth, Inquirer Staff Writer
Regulators ordered a Montgomery County wastewater-treatment operation last year to halt accepting liquids from a Marcellus Shale natural gas driller after discovering that hundreds of truckloads had been improperly imported into the Delaware watershed. The Delaware River Basin Commission, after learning that 1.8 million gallons of wastewater had been trucked to Hatfield Township, ordered a private industrial treatment facility and the Hatfield Township Municipal Authority to cease accepting the fluids from northern Pennsylvania.
BUSINESS
October 21, 2011 | By Andrew Maykuth, Inquirer Staff Writer
The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency said Thursday it wanted to develop national standards for the disposal of polluted wastewater from shale-gas drilling - a move that puzzled Pennsylvania officials, who said Marcellus Shale operators had already halted discharges. The EPA's proposal is aimed at federally regulated pretreatment facilities that process some wastewater from natural-gas drilling before passing it along to state-regulated municipal sewage systems for final processing and discharge.
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NEWS
August 25, 2016 | By Allison Steele, STAFF WRITER
By next spring, a plot of riverfront land in Camden that was once the site of a wastewater treatment plant may be open to the public as a nature preserve. On Tuesday Camden County officials formally announced plans to create the Cramer Hill Nature Preserve, which will encompass 35 acres on the banks of the Delaware River that has been empty since the plant was torn down in 1990. The site, which is adjacent to Petty's Island, has since become home to birds and deer. Once the park is completed, residents in the area will have direct access to an urban forest, as well as the river.
BUSINESS
May 7, 2016 | By Andrew Maykuth, STAFF WRITER
Pennsylvania American Water, a subsidiary of American Water of Voorhees, said Thursday that it has signed an agreement to acquire the wastewater assets of the Borough of New Cumberland in Cumberland County for $23 million. The New Cumberland wastewater system serves about 3,100 customers, who already receive water service from Pennsylvania American. The company agreed not to file a rate-increase request before 2018. The sale requires approval from the Pennsylvania Public Utility Commission and the state Department of Environmental Protection.
BUSINESS
April 29, 2016 | By Andrew Maykuth, STAFF WRITER
Voters in sparsely populated Highland Township, Elk County, where a proposed Marcellus Shale wastewater disposal well has divided the community, voted Tuesday to create a home-rule charter commission. By a 91-78 margin, 54 percent of voters approved a ballot measure establishing a seven-member commission to write a charter, which would be presented to voters at a later date for approval. Seneca Resources Corp., a drilling company that wants to build a wastewater injection well, has mounted a legal challenge against a township ordinance banning the sites.
NEWS
December 24, 2015 | By Andrew Maykuth, STAFF WRITER
Pennsylvania American Water has acquired the wastewater system of Fairview Township, York County, for $16.8 million. The system serves about 4,000 customers, including more than 200 commercial accounts where Pennsylvania American Water already provides water service. The utility, a subsidiary of American Water Works Co. Inc. of Voorhees, agreed to invest $13 million in system improvements and to reimburse the township for up to $1 million for a sewer-line relocation project related to the Pennsylvania Turnpike.
NEWS
December 18, 2015
A Montgomery County businessman was charged Wednesday with violating environmental regulations by discarding water samples that did not meet federal standards and falsifying reports. Federal prosecutors said Matthew Brozena of Telford, president of MAB Environmental Services Inc., violated the Clean Water Act while operating wastewater treatment plants for BC Natural Chicken and Buckingham Valley Nursing Center. Brozena, 58, allegedly instructed his employees to discard water samples that had more pollutants than federal permits allowed and to falsely report test results.
BUSINESS
October 23, 2015 | By Andrew Maykuth, Inquirer Staff Writer
Pennsylvania American Water, a subsidiary of American Water Works Co. of Voorhees, closed acquisitions of five water and wastewater systems in Clarion, Northumberland and Butler counties for $3.8 million. In Clarion County, the company acquired the Shippenville Borough Wastewater System and the Paint Township Water System, which combined serve about 700 residents. In Northumberland County, it bought the water and wastewater assets of the McEwensville Municipal Authority, which serves about 400 residents.
NEWS
August 19, 2015 | By Caitlin McCabe, Inquirer Staff Writer
The Delaware County agency responsible for treating sewage from systems that serve 500,000 area residents has agreed to pay nearly $1.4 million to settle a claim it let pollutants seep into Ridley Creek, Chester Creek, and the Delaware River. In a lawsuit filed last month, the Delaware County Regional Water Authority was accused of too often letting untreated wastewater flow into the tributaries, endangering residents of Delaware County and parts of Chester County, many of whom live in low-income communities.
BUSINESS
July 20, 2014 | By David Sell, Inquirer Staff Writer
The Borough of West Chester early this week won the latest episode in a years-long court battle with drugmaker Pfizer over sewer payments owed to the borough by Wyeth, the pharmaceutical company that Pfizer bought in 2009 for $68 billion. Chester County Court of Common Pleas Judge Robert J. Shenkin ruled that Pfizer must give the borough $1.72 million for missed payments under a 1984 agreement that called for Wyeth to make quarterly payments of about $200,000 for the life of the Goose Creek Sewer Treatment plant.
BUSINESS
June 13, 2014 | By Andrew Maykuth, Inquirer Staff Writer
XTO Energy Inc. is seeking the dismissal of criminal charges for a 2010 gas-drilling spill, saying Pennsylvania Attorney General Kathleen G. Kane selectively prosecuted the company in pursuit of a politically motivated anti-fracking agenda. The Exxon Mobil subsidiary filed a motion in Lycoming County Court on Monday arguing that the Office of Attorney General had failed to prove a criminal case against it in connection with the spill of about 50,000 gallons of wastewater at a Marcellus Shale drilling site.
NEWS
April 2, 2014 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Inquirer Staff Writer
George J. Crits, 92, of Ardmore, an expert in the field of water and wastewater treatment, died Thursday, March 27, at his home of causes related to aging. Mr. Crits was renowned in the industry for his expertise in ion exchange technology. Ion exchange is used to soften water and separate out unwanted elements. Mr. Crits wrote three books on the subject, the last of which was published in 2012. It was titled Crits Notes on Water and Ion Exchange . Bill Runyan, president of Idreco USA Ltd., a water treatment company in West Chester, called Crits Notes "the Bible of water treatment.
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