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NEWS
December 4, 2009 | By Sandy Bauers INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Months ago, with little public awareness, the Delaware County wastewater treatment plant got a state permit to accept wastewater from natural gas-drilling operations hundreds of miles away. The plan was to take the polluted water from the burgeoning - and contentious - industry in the Marcellus Shale region, transport it by truck or train to the Chester facility, treat it there, and then discharge it into the Delaware River. Until yesterday, that is, when the permit was abruptly rescinded.
NEWS
May 16, 2008 | By Jeff Shields INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Water Commissioner Bernard Brunwasser says a new, privatized sludge plant in Southwest Philadelphia would reduce the human waste stored on site, require fewer diesel trucks to haul that waste, and eliminate the putrid smell that can extend more than a mile in any direction from under the Platt Bridge. What seems like an easy sell has been anything but because, in part, it would eliminate 60 union jobs at the city's current "biosolids" plant, a nice name for the not-so-nice mess that comes out of the city's wastewater.
NEWS
March 4, 2008 | By Sandy Bauers INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
A regional tree-planting effort, a youth group that refurbishes bicycles, and a solar-home builder are among seven regional "sustainability innovators" recognized last night by the Pennsylvania Environmental Council. This was the second year for the awards program, designed to "celebrate these leaders and encourage more to follow," said Patrick Starr, vice president of the organization's southeast region. Fourteen finalists were selected from 47 nominees representing facets of "sustainability," from the environment to economic and social justice.
NEWS
June 21, 2006 | By Sandy Bauers INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
A week after a contaminant was released into the Wissahickon Creek, killing more than 1,000 fish, malfunctions at the Ambler sewage treatment plant Monday night sent 55,000 gallons of raw sewage into the waterway. No additional fish were killed, but "obviously, from a water-quality standpoint, this is adding insult to injury," said Dan Tredinnick, spokesman for the state Fish and Boat Commission. Meanwhile, a state Department of Environmental Protection lab has detected cyanide compounds in water samples taken last week from the Wissahickon after the fish kill was reported downstream of the Upper Gwynedd Township Wastewater Treatment Plant.
NEWS
June 18, 2006 | By Julie Shaw INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
It was a gorgeous day for racing on the Schuylkill yesterday, with the sun shining and water sparkling - and it was all the more exhilarating after a health advisory that nearly threatened to keep rowers on dry land. The 78 races in the Schuylkill Navy Regatta were going "superbly," Clete Graham, commodore of the Schuylkill Navy, said as he sat on the awards grandstand by the Columbia Bridge. "There were no qualms, no hesitations. It was a beautiful day. " About 600 athletes from 42 clubs came out. They were thrilled to compete, and didn't see any signs of a Montgomery County fish kill, Graham said.
NEWS
March 18, 2006 | By Walter F. Naedele INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The state Department of Environmental Protection is awaiting tests of Delaware River water after an apparently faulty overflow valve caused pollution from a wastewater treatment plant in Falls Township. DEP spokeswoman Deborah Fries said yesterday that a Waste Management Inc. worker, arriving for his 6 a.m. shift on Monday at the GROWS landfill, found an overflow alarm alerting him that 19,000 gallons of diluted material from GROWS and the Tullytown landfill had flowed into a tidal marsh.
NEWS
January 27, 2006 | By Benjamin Y. Lowe and Nancy Petersen INQUIRER STAFF WRITERS
In western Chester County, where tract houses nudge Amish farms, and buggies share the road with SUVs, major development in four fast-growing communities has come to a halt for more than two years. The problem is sewage. The state has stopped the planned construction of at least 1,500 homes, along with additional retail and office space, because the area's privately owned sewage plant doesn't have the capacity to handle the wastewater generated by thousands more people. In a worst-case scenario, the plant in South Coatesville eventually could have dumped raw sewage into Brandywine Creek.
NEWS
July 12, 2005 | By Christine Schiavo INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
State, county and township officials say they don't know what prompted federal agents to take the unusual step of confiscating records at the Bristol Township Wastewater Treatment Plant in June, and a federal grand jury to subpoena workers there in March. The Environmental Protection Agency sent criminal investigators to the plant on the Delaware River on June 30. Agents with search warrants carted boxes of documents from the plant. "It does seem pretty unusual to me," said Bob Wendelgass of Clean Water Action, a lobbying group that monitors enforcement of the Clean Water Act. The act is one of about a dozen laws the EPA enforces nationally.
NEWS
July 1, 2005 | By Walter F. Naedele INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Agents for the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency served federal search warrants at the Bristol Township wastewater treatment plant yesterday, EPA spokeswoman Bonnie Smith said. No other information was available, she said. On March 30, federal officials served subpoenas on behalf of the EPA on four employees of the Bristol Township Sewer Department, requiring them to testify before a grand jury in April. Messages left for officials at the township office were not returned.
NEWS
January 28, 2005 | By Nancy Petersen INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
A plan to convert 99 acres of fertile Chester County farmland that was under permanent protection for agricultural use to a field for wastewater disposal has been struck down by a Chester County Court judge. The ruling, issued last week by Judge Thomas G. Gavin, upheld an earlier decision by the Chester County Agricultural Land Preservation Board that said the proposed use violated the terms of a 10-year-old agreement between the county and Ox-View Farms. Gavin's ruling also chided the landowner for trying to double-dip into the public purse, and it has prompted county officials to close the loophole to preclude others from trying the same thing.
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