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Watchmen

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ENTERTAINMENT
July 24, 2009
'THE WATCHMEN" (director's cut) and "Coraline" both hit DVD this week, and "Coraline," for all of its competitor's trumpeted darkness, is the creepier movie. "Coraline," based on a Neil Gaimen book, is a stop-motion animated movie (from the guy who animated "The Nightmare Before Christmas") about a dissatisfied little girl who moves to a creepy old house with a link to an alternate reality that gives her the parents she thinks she wants. "Coraline" comes by its uneasy vibe with inventiveness rather than the over-the-top shocks and gore of "The Watchmen" - Coraline's "perfect" parents have an eerie, hollow quality, amplified by the blank buttons they have for eyes.
NEWS
March 5, 2009 | By Steven Rea INQUIRER MOVIE CRITIC
To borrow a line from "The Times They Are A-Changin'," the Dylan anthem expertly stitched into a montage of seismic 20th-century events in the opening moments of Watchmen, this movie will shake your windows and rattle your walls. At least it will for a couple of hours, before 40-odd minutes of draggy, comic-book exposition smother the wild, subversive superhero business that came before. Watchmen is a fanboy's fantasy come true. Based on Alan Moore and Dave Gibbons' lauded, layered graphic novel - and handled with reverence by screenwriters David Hayter and Alex Tse and director Zack Snyder - the film follows a group of outcast caped crusaders as they search for the killer of one of their own. Seedy, corrupt, out of shape, these aren't your father's superheroes, though one of the "masks," Sally Jupiter (Carla Gugino)
NEWS
July 2, 1997 | by Ron Avery, Daily News Staff Writer
It should be quiet, boring work, but being night watchman at a public swimming pool in Philadelphia can be one of the scariest and most dangerous city jobs. An empty swimming pool surrounded by an easy-to-climb, chain-link fence seems to beckon neighborhood tough guys, especially on sweltering nights. Few watchmen will spend an entire season without being challenged. They work in two shifts, 3-11 p.m. and 11 p.m to 7 a.m, for $6 an hour. They are unarmed and instructed never to physically resist intruders.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 6, 2009 | By Steven Rea INQUIRER MOVIE CRITIC
To borrow a line from "The Times They Are A-Changin'," the Dylan anthem expertly stitched into a montage of seismic 20th century events in the opening moments of Watchmen, this movie will shake your windows and rattle your walls. At least it will for a couple of hours, before 40-odd minutes of draggy, comic-book exposition smother the wild, subversive superhero business that came before. Watchmen is a fanboy's fantasy come true. Based on Alan Moore and Dave Gibbons' lauded, layered graphic novel - and handled with reverence by screenwriters David Hayter and Alex Tse and director Zack Snyder - the film follows a group of outcast caped crusaders as they search for the killer of one of their own. Seedy, corrupt, out of shape, these aren't your father's superheroes, though one of the "masks," Sally Jupiter (Carla Gugino)
ENTERTAINMENT
July 24, 2009
"Watchmen: Director's Cut" (R/NR, 2009, Warner Bros.): If Batman's badly needed cinematic reboot put comic book films on a new kind of notice, "Watchmen" - which brings the cherished 1986 graphic novel both to the big screen and into the mainstream - essentially raises the bar beyond reach. That's in equal parts due to how well the film brings to life the anti-superheroes and villains (Jackie Earle Haley, Billy Crudup, Malin Akerman, Patrick Wilson, Jeffrey Dean Morgan, Matthew Goode) that comprise the cast, how faithful it is to the source material in doing so, and how perfectly it makes the alternate-history United States in which they exist practically a starring character in its own right.
NEWS
July 2, 1997 | by Ron Avery, Daily News Staff Writer
Opening day at Jacobs Playground swimming pool in Torresdale was the kind that gives Philadelphia public pool supervisors ulcers. Playground supervisor Charlie Huckel remembers it this way: Within 30 minutes of opening on June 17, a policewoman assigned to keep order was attacked and suffered minor injuries, a dozen cops descended on the pool, a man was arrested for the assault and the pool closed for the day. In retaliation, glass and...
ENTERTAINMENT
March 25, 2011 | By Steven Rea, Inquirer Movie Critic
Sucker Punch , a barrage of green-screen effects and comic-book portentousness from 300 and Watchmen director Zack Snyder, is hands-down the most nightmarishly awful film of the year. A field day for schoolgirl fetishists and fanboys with a penchant for steampunk (but with Snyder's leaden dialogue, you've got to call it steamclunk), this staggering failure borrows from Baz Luhrmann's Moulin Rouge , Marc Caro and Jean-Pierre Jeunet's The City of Lost Children , Quentin Tarantino's Kill Bill, and a variety of psych-ward melodramas from The Snake Pit to The Uninvited . If that sounds like it'd make for a cool mash-up, maybe it would have - if Snyder had anything on his mind apart from exploding zeppelins, fire-breathing dragons, Japanese samurai fights, and Carla Gugino doing a campy Polish accent.
NEWS
July 26, 1988 | By Dan Stets, Inquirer Staff Writer
The watchmen who sign in visitors at Philadelphia Gas Works buildings earn an average of $50,190 a year in wages and fringe benefits, a lawyer representing consumers in PGW's $49 million rate case revealed yesterday. In addition, security guards working for the city-owned gas company earn an average of $45,732 a year in wages and fringe benefits, which is more than many Philadelphia police officers make, said John Hanger, a lawyer from Community Legal Services, which has been named public advocate for the case.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 9, 2011 | By MOLLY EICHEL, eichelm@phillynews.com 215-854-5909
Critics of "Spider-Man: Turn off the Dark" complain that it's an expensive, self-serious production with little heart. So, what would happen if a show about superheroes tried to do the exact opposite? Save the Day Productions is on it. In the monthly production "Superheroes who are Super!" a group of actors brings the comic books from page to stage, verbatim. On Saturday, the company will take to two venues - the Annenberg Center for the Performing Arts (as part of MERGE, an evening of short works by local professionals and students)
NEWS
November 1, 1988 | By Donna St. George, Inquirer Staff Writer
It was in the laboratory at Temple University that Francis Case made his contributions to science. It was there, too - surrounded by flasks and beakers and cryptic notations - that he made persistent study his calling. And after Dr. Case died yesterday at the Medical College of Pennsylvania and Hospital, he was recalled as a scientist so dedicated that nothing seemed to stop him - not the 20 years that had passed since his retirement, not his age of 89, not even the campus watchmen.
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ENTERTAINMENT
March 25, 2011 | By Steven Rea, Inquirer Movie Critic
Sucker Punch , a barrage of green-screen effects and comic-book portentousness from 300 and Watchmen director Zack Snyder, is hands-down the most nightmarishly awful film of the year. A field day for schoolgirl fetishists and fanboys with a penchant for steampunk (but with Snyder's leaden dialogue, you've got to call it steamclunk), this staggering failure borrows from Baz Luhrmann's Moulin Rouge , Marc Caro and Jean-Pierre Jeunet's The City of Lost Children , Quentin Tarantino's Kill Bill, and a variety of psych-ward melodramas from The Snake Pit to The Uninvited . If that sounds like it'd make for a cool mash-up, maybe it would have - if Snyder had anything on his mind apart from exploding zeppelins, fire-breathing dragons, Japanese samurai fights, and Carla Gugino doing a campy Polish accent.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 9, 2011 | By MOLLY EICHEL, eichelm@phillynews.com 215-854-5909
Critics of "Spider-Man: Turn off the Dark" complain that it's an expensive, self-serious production with little heart. So, what would happen if a show about superheroes tried to do the exact opposite? Save the Day Productions is on it. In the monthly production "Superheroes who are Super!" a group of actors brings the comic books from page to stage, verbatim. On Saturday, the company will take to two venues - the Annenberg Center for the Performing Arts (as part of MERGE, an evening of short works by local professionals and students)
ENTERTAINMENT
July 24, 2009
"Watchmen: Director's Cut" (R/NR, 2009, Warner Bros.): If Batman's badly needed cinematic reboot put comic book films on a new kind of notice, "Watchmen" - which brings the cherished 1986 graphic novel both to the big screen and into the mainstream - essentially raises the bar beyond reach. That's in equal parts due to how well the film brings to life the anti-superheroes and villains (Jackie Earle Haley, Billy Crudup, Malin Akerman, Patrick Wilson, Jeffrey Dean Morgan, Matthew Goode) that comprise the cast, how faithful it is to the source material in doing so, and how perfectly it makes the alternate-history United States in which they exist practically a starring character in its own right.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 24, 2009
'THE WATCHMEN" (director's cut) and "Coraline" both hit DVD this week, and "Coraline," for all of its competitor's trumpeted darkness, is the creepier movie. "Coraline," based on a Neil Gaimen book, is a stop-motion animated movie (from the guy who animated "The Nightmare Before Christmas") about a dissatisfied little girl who moves to a creepy old house with a link to an alternate reality that gives her the parents she thinks she wants. "Coraline" comes by its uneasy vibe with inventiveness rather than the over-the-top shocks and gore of "The Watchmen" - Coraline's "perfect" parents have an eerie, hollow quality, amplified by the blank buttons they have for eyes.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 11, 2009 | By JEROME MAIDA For the Daily News
If there is one element missing from the comics shelves these days, it is a good mystery. This is interesting considering that the two major properties translated to the big screen this year - "Watchmen" and "Wolverine" - are based on the genre. With "Watchmen," it's the search for the manipulator behind the scenes; with "Wolverine," it's a journey to rediscover his past. But in retrospect, the mysteries were unsatisfying. "Watchmen's" mastermind turned out to be the only hero who survived an assassination attempt.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 6, 2009 | By Steven Rea INQUIRER MOVIE CRITIC
To borrow a line from "The Times They Are A-Changin'," the Dylan anthem expertly stitched into a montage of seismic 20th century events in the opening moments of Watchmen, this movie will shake your windows and rattle your walls. At least it will for a couple of hours, before 40-odd minutes of draggy, comic-book exposition smother the wild, subversive superhero business that came before. Watchmen is a fanboy's fantasy come true. Based on Alan Moore and Dave Gibbons' lauded, layered graphic novel - and handled with reverence by screenwriters David Hayter and Alex Tse and director Zack Snyder - the film follows a group of outcast caped crusaders as they search for the killer of one of their own. Seedy, corrupt, out of shape, these aren't your father's superheroes, though one of the "masks," Sally Jupiter (Carla Gugino)
NEWS
March 5, 2009 | By Steven Rea INQUIRER MOVIE CRITIC
To borrow a line from "The Times They Are A-Changin'," the Dylan anthem expertly stitched into a montage of seismic 20th-century events in the opening moments of Watchmen, this movie will shake your windows and rattle your walls. At least it will for a couple of hours, before 40-odd minutes of draggy, comic-book exposition smother the wild, subversive superhero business that came before. Watchmen is a fanboy's fantasy come true. Based on Alan Moore and Dave Gibbons' lauded, layered graphic novel - and handled with reverence by screenwriters David Hayter and Alex Tse and director Zack Snyder - the film follows a group of outcast caped crusaders as they search for the killer of one of their own. Seedy, corrupt, out of shape, these aren't your father's superheroes, though one of the "masks," Sally Jupiter (Carla Gugino)
ENTERTAINMENT
December 29, 2008 | By JEROME MAIDA For the Daily News
Praise the Lord and pass the ammunition. That line neatly sums up the plot and freewheeling attitude of "The Man With No Name," Dynamite's latest successful effort to put an icon in print. Incredibly, this is the first time the character has been adapted to comics or even seen the light of day since Clint Eastwood brought him to life in a trio of 1960s films helmed by Sergio Leone and forever - and fondly - recalled as "spaghetti Westerns. " The character's enduring popularity and name recognition would seem to have made further tales in comics or elsewhere a no-brainer long before now. But the feeling here is that the character was so unique and Eastwood's performances so ingrained in fans' minds, that it seemed impossible to satisfy them and do the character justice.
NEWS
July 2, 1997 | by Ron Avery, Daily News Staff Writer
It should be quiet, boring work, but being night watchman at a public swimming pool in Philadelphia can be one of the scariest and most dangerous city jobs. An empty swimming pool surrounded by an easy-to-climb, chain-link fence seems to beckon neighborhood tough guys, especially on sweltering nights. Few watchmen will spend an entire season without being challenged. They work in two shifts, 3-11 p.m. and 11 p.m to 7 a.m, for $6 an hour. They are unarmed and instructed never to physically resist intruders.
NEWS
July 2, 1997 | by Ron Avery, Daily News Staff Writer
Opening day at Jacobs Playground swimming pool in Torresdale was the kind that gives Philadelphia public pool supervisors ulcers. Playground supervisor Charlie Huckel remembers it this way: Within 30 minutes of opening on June 17, a policewoman assigned to keep order was attacked and suffered minor injuries, a dozen cops descended on the pool, a man was arrested for the assault and the pool closed for the day. In retaliation, glass and...
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