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ENTERTAINMENT
May 31, 2012
Rhubarb Barbecue Sauce   3 pounds rhubarb (about 9 cups), trimmed and cut into 1/4-inch slices 1 medium red onion, diced (about 3/4 cup) 2 cups raisins, chopped 1 medium orange habanero pepper, seeded and minced (reserve seeds to adjust heat at the end) 2 cups brown sugar 3/4 cup honey 3/4 cup cider vinegar 1 teaspoon cinnamon 1 teaspoon allspice 1 teaspoon ground ginger 1 teaspoon sea salt   If canning, prepare canner, jars and lids.
FOOD
May 9, 2013
Makes 4 servings 4 tablespoons butter,    softened 3/4 cup heavy cream 1/2 cup poached chicken    or lobster chunks,    small peeled raw    shrimp, cooked    spinach, or a few    slices of black truffle Salt and pepper 4 eggs Ground nutmeg Small handful chopped    chives, tarragon,    parsley, or other    tender herbs 1. Preheat the oven to 400 degrees....
FOOD
April 13, 1988 | By POLLY FISHER, Special to the Daily News
Dear Polly: My father-in-law has been doing his own canning for the past two years. He says he cans tomatoes by cooking them, then putting them into hot jars and turning the jars upside down for 15 minutes or so. He says they seal just fine and you don't have to process them, as the canning books state. I have been canning for 28 years and I have never heard of doing it his way. Is it safe? I think he is wrong, but I need someone to back me up on this one. - Delores Dear Delores: Your father-in-law's method IS NOT SAFE!
FOOD
June 26, 2008
Makes 16 servings 1. Place a rack in the upper third of the oven and heat the oven to 350 degrees. Spray a 9-inch springform pan with cooking spray and line the bottom with a round of parchment paper. Spray the parchment. Wrap the outside of the pan with aluminum foil to prevent any water from coming in later from the water bath. 2. Press the farmer cheese through a fine-mesh strainer to ensure the curds are fine. In the bowl of a stand mixer fitted with the paddle attachment (or use a large bowl and a hand mixer)
FOOD
February 13, 2000 | By Aliza Green, FOR THE INQUIRER
With a mouth-feel like creamy velvet, flan is the definitive comfort food. It is probably the only food that grown-ups enjoy just as much as babies. Whether you call it baked custard, pot-de-creme, crema Catalana, or flan, it's basically the same thing: a mixture of eggs and some kind of milk product, along with other ingredients, that is slowly baked till set. Creme brulee is simply an extra-rich version covered with a crackly sugar topping. I'm here to take away the mysteries of custards so that you will find it easy to make all sorts of flans, sweet and savory.
FOOD
December 3, 1997 | by Aliza Green, For the Daily News
Yo, Chefs! My wife and I like to bake New York-style cheesecakes when company comes to our house. But how do you bake one without ending up with cracks in the center? We tried using a baker's water bath, adding extra cornstarch or flour and leaving it in the oven (after baking), door open, for an hour to cool. I usually add a topping to hide the cracks, but not everyone likes topping on their cheesecake. Michael W. Cervone Philadelphia Dear Michael, We asked mistress of pastry Mary Ellen Hatch, pastry chef at the Rose Tattoo Cafe at 19th and Callowhill streets, where she's been creating an entire menu of wonderful homemade desserts.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 11, 2008
Q. Do you have a recipe for a good fruitcake? I would like to make some as gifts for my aunts and grandparents, but only if they're good and don't inspire any jokes. Many thanks. Somewhere along the line, fruitcake must have been a delicious item, because it dates to the Middle Ages. There is an original copy of an old Roman recipe that lists raisins, preserved fruits, pine nuts, honey, and spices that were all mixed into a barley mash loaf. This was the precursor to any modern-day fruitcake, and the same loaf was probably passed from toga party to toga party.
FOOD
June 26, 2008
Makes 16 servings 1. Butter a 9-inch springform pan with sides at least 23/4-inches high, and wrap the outside of the pan in a double layer of aluminum foil. 2. In a medium bowl, combine the graham cracker crumbs, walnuts, 3 tablespoons sugar and a pinch of salt. Pour in the melted butter and stir together, using your fingers or a fork, until all of the dry ingredients are uniformly moist. Place the crust mixture into the springform pan and use your fingers to pat an even layer (about one-quarter-inch thick)
FOOD
July 6, 1988 | By Andrew Schloss, Special to The Inquirer
A gourmet in the wilderness is an unnatural sight. Stripped of whisk and processor, wrestling with cratered cookware and stoves that know no temperature, even the most seasoned cook is apt to plead for mercy. Is it any wonder that we become resigned to a fate of endless burgers and franks rather than face the demands of making food in the wild? Good camping and good cooking need not be mutually exclusive, for many of the techniques we depend upon daily can be accomplished as easily over an open fire as on a range.
FOOD
September 7, 1986 | By Leslie Land, Special to The Inquirer
Changes in the world of food come thick and fast these days, but when it comes to sweet corn on the cob, the more things change, the more they remain the same. It always has been a seasonal delicacy. Ever was and ever shall be, from the looks of things, since the latest "big advance" in corn breeding turns out to be a pretty small step. A great deal has been made of the development of corn that stays sweet after harvesting, not just for an hour or so, but for days. "No more of that 'get the water boiling before picking the corn,' " rejoiced the culinary pundits.
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FOOD
May 9, 2013
Makes 4 servings 4 tablespoons butter,    softened 3/4 cup heavy cream 1/2 cup poached chicken    or lobster chunks,    small peeled raw    shrimp, cooked    spinach, or a few    slices of black truffle Salt and pepper 4 eggs Ground nutmeg Small handful chopped    chives, tarragon,    parsley, or other    tender herbs 1. Preheat the oven to 400 degrees....
ENTERTAINMENT
May 31, 2012
Rhubarb Barbecue Sauce   3 pounds rhubarb (about 9 cups), trimmed and cut into 1/4-inch slices 1 medium red onion, diced (about 3/4 cup) 2 cups raisins, chopped 1 medium orange habanero pepper, seeded and minced (reserve seeds to adjust heat at the end) 2 cups brown sugar 3/4 cup honey 3/4 cup cider vinegar 1 teaspoon cinnamon 1 teaspoon allspice 1 teaspoon ground ginger 1 teaspoon sea salt   If canning, prepare canner, jars and lids.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 11, 2008
Q. Do you have a recipe for a good fruitcake? I would like to make some as gifts for my aunts and grandparents, but only if they're good and don't inspire any jokes. Many thanks. Somewhere along the line, fruitcake must have been a delicious item, because it dates to the Middle Ages. There is an original copy of an old Roman recipe that lists raisins, preserved fruits, pine nuts, honey, and spices that were all mixed into a barley mash loaf. This was the precursor to any modern-day fruitcake, and the same loaf was probably passed from toga party to toga party.
FOOD
June 26, 2008
Makes 16 servings 1. Butter a 9-inch springform pan with sides at least 23/4-inches high, and wrap the outside of the pan in a double layer of aluminum foil. 2. In a medium bowl, combine the graham cracker crumbs, walnuts, 3 tablespoons sugar and a pinch of salt. Pour in the melted butter and stir together, using your fingers or a fork, until all of the dry ingredients are uniformly moist. Place the crust mixture into the springform pan and use your fingers to pat an even layer (about one-quarter-inch thick)
FOOD
June 26, 2008
Makes 16 servings 1. Place a rack in the upper third of the oven and heat the oven to 350 degrees. Spray a 9-inch springform pan with cooking spray and line the bottom with a round of parchment paper. Spray the parchment. Wrap the outside of the pan with aluminum foil to prevent any water from coming in later from the water bath. 2. Press the farmer cheese through a fine-mesh strainer to ensure the curds are fine. In the bowl of a stand mixer fitted with the paddle attachment (or use a large bowl and a hand mixer)
FOOD
February 13, 2000 | By Aliza Green, FOR THE INQUIRER
With a mouth-feel like creamy velvet, flan is the definitive comfort food. It is probably the only food that grown-ups enjoy just as much as babies. Whether you call it baked custard, pot-de-creme, crema Catalana, or flan, it's basically the same thing: a mixture of eggs and some kind of milk product, along with other ingredients, that is slowly baked till set. Creme brulee is simply an extra-rich version covered with a crackly sugar topping. I'm here to take away the mysteries of custards so that you will find it easy to make all sorts of flans, sweet and savory.
FOOD
December 3, 1997 | by Aliza Green, For the Daily News
Yo, Chefs! My wife and I like to bake New York-style cheesecakes when company comes to our house. But how do you bake one without ending up with cracks in the center? We tried using a baker's water bath, adding extra cornstarch or flour and leaving it in the oven (after baking), door open, for an hour to cool. I usually add a topping to hide the cracks, but not everyone likes topping on their cheesecake. Michael W. Cervone Philadelphia Dear Michael, We asked mistress of pastry Mary Ellen Hatch, pastry chef at the Rose Tattoo Cafe at 19th and Callowhill streets, where she's been creating an entire menu of wonderful homemade desserts.
FOOD
July 6, 1988 | By Andrew Schloss, Special to The Inquirer
A gourmet in the wilderness is an unnatural sight. Stripped of whisk and processor, wrestling with cratered cookware and stoves that know no temperature, even the most seasoned cook is apt to plead for mercy. Is it any wonder that we become resigned to a fate of endless burgers and franks rather than face the demands of making food in the wild? Good camping and good cooking need not be mutually exclusive, for many of the techniques we depend upon daily can be accomplished as easily over an open fire as on a range.
FOOD
April 13, 1988 | By POLLY FISHER, Special to the Daily News
Dear Polly: My father-in-law has been doing his own canning for the past two years. He says he cans tomatoes by cooking them, then putting them into hot jars and turning the jars upside down for 15 minutes or so. He says they seal just fine and you don't have to process them, as the canning books state. I have been canning for 28 years and I have never heard of doing it his way. Is it safe? I think he is wrong, but I need someone to back me up on this one. - Delores Dear Delores: Your father-in-law's method IS NOT SAFE!
FOOD
February 25, 1987 | By Andrew Schloss, Special to The Inquirer
There is no problem too big for a pudding. What trouble could withstand the crackled crust of a well-browned betty or the creamy paunch of a pot de creme? Regardless of one's distress, the world is always a better place after a bowl of pudding makes its mark. Puddings take so many forms and can be made of such a wide variety of ingredients that it is difficult to say exactly what one is. Almost all contain milk, a sweetener, eggs and starch. Any dairy product can be used, from skim milk to cream cheese, and the sweetener is completely dependent on personal taste.
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