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Water Damage

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NEWS
May 4, 2011
The Haddon Township public library in Westmont will remain closed for most of the week because of interior water damage. A passerby notified police Sunday of the problem, which involved a malfunctioning pump in the boiler room. Though only about 10 books were damaged, carpeting and drywall have required repairs, according to a Camden County Library spokesman. The branch is tentatively scheduled to reopen Saturday. Due dates will be extended on items checked out from the branch and fines waived on overdue items for the duration of the closure, according to library officials.
NEWS
July 12, 1989 | By Kathy Brennan and Kit Konolige, Daily News Staff Writers
A smoky, four-alarm electrical fire last night cleared the restaurant-ship Moshulu at Penn's Landing of 200 customers and employees, and sent two customers, three firefighters and the restaurant manager to hospitals. Reataurant officials said today there was no fire damage to the restaurant portion of the ship, which suffered only smoke and water damage. Fire officials today were still investigating the cause of the fire that damaged the turn-of-the-century ship, which is the oldest steel-hulled sailing vessel still afloat.
SPORTS
February 14, 2005 | By Sam Carchidi INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Homeless in Haddonfield. That's the situation involving the Haddonfield boys' basketball team, which has been without a gym for 2 1/2 weeks and will play most of its remaining "home" games at Rutgers-Camden. No gym, no problem. Haddonfield, which was forced out of its gym because a broken pipe caused water damage to the hardwood floor, hasn't missed a beat. The defending Group 2 state champion Bulldogs (17-1) scored three more wins last week and have climbed into the No. 1 spot in The Inquirer's South Jersey rankings for the first time this season.
NEWS
April 2, 2002 | By Cynthia Burton INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Sometime over the holiday weekend, a valve on an old City Hall air-conditioning unit burst, sending buckets of water into the law library, City Council chambers, the Mayor's Reception Room, and the north portal. The damage was so severe that Council may not be able to use its ornate chambers until next fall. In the next few weeks, Council will consider the mayor's budget, school taxes, and a controversial cut in the city wage tax. But late yesterday, no one knew where Council would hold its meetings and hearings.
NEWS
June 28, 2002 | By Cynthia Burton and Clea Benson INQUIRER STAFF WRITERS
Philadelphia taxpayers may have to spend millions to fix the water-damaged City Council chambers and other ornate rooms in century-old City Hall, but city officials have refused to disclose how much it would cost or even what caused the three-month-old flood. Even though the water damage was discovered April 1, there are still huge blowers stationed in City Hall to dry out the walls and ceilings - a sign of severe damage. "There's been no update, literally, since the time of the event," said Councilman Michael Nutter, who often wanders into the darkened Council chamber to see if anyone is fixing it. So far, he hasn't seen any work under way, but he noted that City Council's antique desks were returned to the chamber last week.
NEWS
September 20, 2000 | By Kristin E. Holmes, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
A water-damaged cable wiped out telephone service in the last few days for as many as 2,000 Warminster customers in a three- to four-mile area of the township. Some residents said yesterday they had been without service since Saturday, having to resort to cell phones and neighbors to get and receive calls. A 14-person crew has been working on the problem since Monday morning, according to Verizon Inc. spokeswoman Sharon Shaffer. Most customers should have had service restored by late last night, Shaffer said yesterday.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 22, 2014 | By Samantha Melamed, Inquirer Staff Writer
For many people, a do-it-yourself renovation is merely the cheapest path toward a more beautiful place to live. But for Percy Bright and Tara Mangini, their house makeover became something more: It was a place to learn on the job, a showcase for their design sensibility, and ultimately, the launchpad for a new career. Today, Bright, 29, and Mangini, 30, run the boutique design-build firm Jersey Ice Cream Co. Back in 2009, though, Bright was a graphic designer - and when it came to buying a house, he wasn't even sure what he was looking for. When he came across the South Philadelphia rowhouse, it had "grandma-style" decor - not exactly the stuff of a dynamic interior-design portfolio.
NEWS
September 8, 2014 | By Edward Colimore, Inquirer Staff Writer
When it was launched about 50 years ago, the USS Camden represented a milestone. The combat support ship was the final contract in the 68-year history of New York Shipbuilding Corp. in Camden, and dignitaries turned out for the occasion. They listened to the music of the Woodrow Wilson High School Band, which was dwarfed by the ship's hull as members posed with their instruments and smart uniforms. A black-and-white photograph captured the moment and is a small part of the collection of the Camden County Historical Society, now on loan to the Camden Shipyard and Maritime Museum in the 1900 block of Broadway.
NEWS
April 1, 2014 | By Stephan Salisbury, Inquirer Staff Writer
They don't call it Mud Island for nothing. On Sunday, two days of rain and drizzle had left widening pools and fields of shoe-sucking muck in and around Fort Mifflin on the Delaware River. No one at the fort cared, it seemed. Certainly not the more than 40 volunteers who swarmed the place as the British never did. They were intent on cleaning and polishing and ripping out burned and bedraggled building elements, casting all debris into growing piles of soggy timbers and woebegone insulation.
NEWS
February 7, 1987 | The Philadelphia Inquirer / MICHAEL MALLY
ARMS FOLDED, Sen. Arlen Specter listens as Capt. William J. Jackman (center, with four stripes) describes water damage from a leaky roof at the Naval Hospital. Specter toured the South Philadelphia facility yesterday and said he was not convinced it was unsalvageable and should be closed.
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NEWS
September 8, 2014 | By Edward Colimore, Inquirer Staff Writer
When it was launched about 50 years ago, the USS Camden represented a milestone. The combat support ship was the final contract in the 68-year history of New York Shipbuilding Corp. in Camden, and dignitaries turned out for the occasion. They listened to the music of the Woodrow Wilson High School Band, which was dwarfed by the ship's hull as members posed with their instruments and smart uniforms. A black-and-white photograph captured the moment and is a small part of the collection of the Camden County Historical Society, now on loan to the Camden Shipyard and Maritime Museum in the 1900 block of Broadway.
BUSINESS
June 16, 2014 | By Jeff Gelles, Inquirer Columnist
Hurricane season is starting slowly, and weather forecasters predict that El NiƱo may help spare us this year. But as Hurricane Sandy reminded our region, you never can predict when you'll be in bad luck's bull's-eye. So it's a good time to consider how to avoid another kind of harm: from a Swiss-cheese insurance policy. Some Sandy victims found, for instance, that if losses were caused by both wind and water, a term with a whale of a name - an "anti-concurrent-causation clause" - could help an insurer sidestep or lowball a claim.
NEWS
May 23, 2014 | By Michael Boren, Inquirer Staff Writer
Behind the upside-down chairs on the bar in Tom Fischer's Tavern, a plaque hangs from the wall. "The First Bar on This Site Was Born in 1938," it reads. Over the decades, the Haddon Township bar, which prides itself on attracting a diverse crowd, has served doctors and construction workers, patrons young and old. But on Wednesday, a fire temporarily put a cork in the memories. Fire crews responded sometime before 4 a.m. Valerie Fischer, owner since 1995, said a smoldering cigarette was suspected as the cause, but arson had been ruled out. The worst damage was in a back area known as the smoking patio, Fischer said.
NEWS
May 4, 2014 | By Michaelle Bond, Laura McCrystal, and Allison Steele, Inquirer Staff Writers
Ryan Houck was at work at Tri-Tech Automotive on Jefferson Avenue in Downingtown when he saw the water approaching from down the street Wednesday. Within minutes, the flood was at his feet. "I felt like I was on the Titanic," said Houck, 27. "The water started coming in the doors. " Houck and Tri-Tech owner Lee Captis spent Friday the way many residents did who live and work in flood-prone areas around the region: cleaning mud from the walls and floor. With the water receding and the sun shining - finally - officials and residents were left with assessing the damage from the record-setting rains that swamped the region this week.
NEWS
April 1, 2014 | By Stephan Salisbury, Inquirer Staff Writer
They don't call it Mud Island for nothing. On Sunday, two days of rain and drizzle had left widening pools and fields of shoe-sucking muck in and around Fort Mifflin on the Delaware River. No one at the fort cared, it seemed. Certainly not the more than 40 volunteers who swarmed the place as the British never did. They were intent on cleaning and polishing and ripping out burned and bedraggled building elements, casting all debris into growing piles of soggy timbers and woebegone insulation.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 22, 2014 | By Samantha Melamed, Inquirer Staff Writer
For many people, a do-it-yourself renovation is merely the cheapest path toward a more beautiful place to live. But for Percy Bright and Tara Mangini, their house makeover became something more: It was a place to learn on the job, a showcase for their design sensibility, and ultimately, the launchpad for a new career. Today, Bright, 29, and Mangini, 30, run the boutique design-build firm Jersey Ice Cream Co. Back in 2009, though, Bright was a graphic designer - and when it came to buying a house, he wasn't even sure what he was looking for. When he came across the South Philadelphia rowhouse, it had "grandma-style" decor - not exactly the stuff of a dynamic interior-design portfolio.
NEWS
February 22, 2014 | By Robert Moran, Inquirer Staff Writer
Eugene Nowakowski and his wife spent the night at a Red Cross shelter following a water-main break Wednesday that flooded the basement of his Port Richmond home and left him without water or heat. As he prepared to spend a second night at the Red Cross House in West Philadelphia, what pained him most was the water damage to his custom-made Ken Smith bass guitar. "You can't buy it anywhere. It was made just for me," an angry Nowakowski said Thursday night. The water-main break Wednesday afternoon flooded the basement of at least a dozen homes in the 3000 block of Livingston Street, where the 55-year-old Nowakowski has lived for two decades.
NEWS
January 15, 2014 | BY REGINA MEDINA, Daily News Staff Writer medinar@phillynews.com, 215-854-5985
THE TEACHERS UNION is calling a decision late last week to reopen North Philadelphia's Thomas Edison High School - which closed for three days after the building sustained water damage when a coil burst in the heating/cooling system - potentially hazardous to its students and staff. For now, students and staff are back in the school while a 45,000-square-foot section covering five floors is still cordoned off, school district spokesman Fernando Gallard said. The district hired a private company to clean up the damaged section, which he said is adjacent to the cafeteria.
NEWS
January 8, 2014 | By Barbara Boyer and Sulaiman Abdur-Rahman, Inquirer Staff Writers
The Philadelphia region prepared Monday for a deep freeze that was poised to deliver life-threatening cold and treacherous commutes. The mercury briefly rose to a practically balmy 60 degrees Monday morning in Philadelphia, then steadily fell throughout the day as the arctic air that has been tormenting the Midwest crept eastward. The forecast low was expected to be 7, and Tuesday's high was to inch up only to 12, according to the National Weather Service, which issued a windchill advisory for 12:01 to 5 a.m. The wind chill could plunge to minus-15.
NEWS
December 26, 2013 | By Claudia Vargas, Inquirer Staff Writer
Expensive cars in the front. Cheap cars in the back. John Silva's display strategy has worked well in attracting business to his car dealership in Frankford. But on Monday, a major water main broke across the street, sending water gushing into his car lot and other businesses. "It was all my front line," Silva said Tuesday of his BMW and Mercedes vehicles that were destroyed by the quick-moving current. "My crappy cars were in the back, on the hill. Those were fine. " About 23 million gallons of water broke free from a 106-year-old water main at Frankford and Torresdale Avenues, flooding nearby streets and businesses, including a small ice cream shop and a large CVS. The damage was still being assessed Tuesday.
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