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Water Damage

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NEWS
May 4, 2011
The Haddon Township public library in Westmont will remain closed for most of the week because of interior water damage. A passerby notified police Sunday of the problem, which involved a malfunctioning pump in the boiler room. Though only about 10 books were damaged, carpeting and drywall have required repairs, according to a Camden County Library spokesman. The branch is tentatively scheduled to reopen Saturday. Due dates will be extended on items checked out from the branch and fines waived on overdue items for the duration of the closure, according to library officials.
NEWS
July 12, 1989 | By Kathy Brennan and Kit Konolige, Daily News Staff Writers
A smoky, four-alarm electrical fire last night cleared the restaurant-ship Moshulu at Penn's Landing of 200 customers and employees, and sent two customers, three firefighters and the restaurant manager to hospitals. Reataurant officials said today there was no fire damage to the restaurant portion of the ship, which suffered only smoke and water damage. Fire officials today were still investigating the cause of the fire that damaged the turn-of-the-century ship, which is the oldest steel-hulled sailing vessel still afloat.
SPORTS
February 14, 2005 | By Sam Carchidi INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Homeless in Haddonfield. That's the situation involving the Haddonfield boys' basketball team, which has been without a gym for 2 1/2 weeks and will play most of its remaining "home" games at Rutgers-Camden. No gym, no problem. Haddonfield, which was forced out of its gym because a broken pipe caused water damage to the hardwood floor, hasn't missed a beat. The defending Group 2 state champion Bulldogs (17-1) scored three more wins last week and have climbed into the No. 1 spot in The Inquirer's South Jersey rankings for the first time this season.
NEWS
April 2, 2002 | By Cynthia Burton INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Sometime over the holiday weekend, a valve on an old City Hall air-conditioning unit burst, sending buckets of water into the law library, City Council chambers, the Mayor's Reception Room, and the north portal. The damage was so severe that Council may not be able to use its ornate chambers until next fall. In the next few weeks, Council will consider the mayor's budget, school taxes, and a controversial cut in the city wage tax. But late yesterday, no one knew where Council would hold its meetings and hearings.
NEWS
June 28, 2002 | By Cynthia Burton and Clea Benson INQUIRER STAFF WRITERS
Philadelphia taxpayers may have to spend millions to fix the water-damaged City Council chambers and other ornate rooms in century-old City Hall, but city officials have refused to disclose how much it would cost or even what caused the three-month-old flood. Even though the water damage was discovered April 1, there are still huge blowers stationed in City Hall to dry out the walls and ceilings - a sign of severe damage. "There's been no update, literally, since the time of the event," said Councilman Michael Nutter, who often wanders into the darkened Council chamber to see if anyone is fixing it. So far, he hasn't seen any work under way, but he noted that City Council's antique desks were returned to the chamber last week.
NEWS
September 20, 2000 | By Kristin E. Holmes, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
A water-damaged cable wiped out telephone service in the last few days for as many as 2,000 Warminster customers in a three- to four-mile area of the township. Some residents said yesterday they had been without service since Saturday, having to resort to cell phones and neighbors to get and receive calls. A 14-person crew has been working on the problem since Monday morning, according to Verizon Inc. spokeswoman Sharon Shaffer. Most customers should have had service restored by late last night, Shaffer said yesterday.
NEWS
February 23, 2016 | By Jill Castellano, Staff Writer
SS. Cosmas and Damian Church, in Conshohocken, is closing its doors, effective March 16, the Archdiocese of Philadelphia announced Sunday. In July 2014, the church merged with three other nearby parishes - St. Gertrude, St. Mary and St. Matthew - to form a consolidated St. Matthew Parish under the archdiocese's ongoing Parish Area Pastoral Planning Initiative. St. Matthew, on Fayette Street in Conshohocken, became the main parish location, while the other churches became worshipping sites for occasional Masses and weddings.
NEWS
February 7, 1987 | The Philadelphia Inquirer / MICHAEL MALLY
ARMS FOLDED, Sen. Arlen Specter listens as Capt. William J. Jackman (center, with four stripes) describes water damage from a leaky roof at the Naval Hospital. Specter toured the South Philadelphia facility yesterday and said he was not convinced it was unsalvageable and should be closed.
NEWS
February 8, 1990 | By Lynn Hamilton, Special to The Inquirer
A one-alarm fire in the 300 block of Prospect Street, Phoenixville, caused an estimated $45,000 damage Tuesday, a fire official said. About $10,000 of the damage was done to contents of a twin home, said Chief J.W. Brewer of the West End Fire Company. He said that the fire was accidental, but that the cause had not been determined. The fire began on the third floor of the house, where there were two bedrooms, he said. The fire company received the call about 11:30 a.m., and the fire was under control by noon, Brewer said.
NEWS
May 21, 2010 | Detroit Free Press
When it comes to the housing market for foreclosures - buyer beware. "One mistake that we see all the time is buyers going in and assuming all the mechanicals are working," said Brandon T. Johnson, president of GTJ Consulting in Roseville, Mich. "You have to be careful you don't get burned that way. " Johnson's company maintains foreclosed homes for a number of lenders, Realtors and Freddie Mac. He said the term "as is" shouldn't scare buyers off as long as they know what it means.
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NEWS
February 23, 2016 | By Jill Castellano, Staff Writer
SS. Cosmas and Damian Church, in Conshohocken, is closing its doors, effective March 16, the Archdiocese of Philadelphia announced Sunday. In July 2014, the church merged with three other nearby parishes - St. Gertrude, St. Mary and St. Matthew - to form a consolidated St. Matthew Parish under the archdiocese's ongoing Parish Area Pastoral Planning Initiative. St. Matthew, on Fayette Street in Conshohocken, became the main parish location, while the other churches became worshipping sites for occasional Masses and weddings.
NEWS
February 3, 2016 | By Michael Boren and Emily Babay, STAFF WRITERS
A fire that damaged a Camden County deli appears to be accidental, officials said Monday, though investigators were still trying to determine a cause. The flames began in a storage area behind the deli counter at Amato Bros., 612 White Horse Pike, Oaklyn, around 9 p.m. Sunday. The business had closed several hours earlier and no one was inside, Oaklyn Fire Chief Scott Cairns said. Several passing motorists reported smoke coming from the building. Firefighters contained the fire damage to the storage area and the roof, Cairns said.
REAL_ESTATE
January 10, 2016 | By Alan J. Heavens, Inquirer Real Estate Writer
I chuckled as I wrote this in December because it had been warmer than usual and the next several days promised to be in the upper 50s and mid-60s, if one believes the weather forecasters (I don't). What I offer are suggestions from the people who make the Snow Joe Hybrid iON, a snow blower that operates on either a lithium battery or an AC power cord. As veteran readers know, I bought a gas-driven snow thrower/blower in the fall of 1997 after having weathered the winter of 1996 and its record snowfalls.
BUSINESS
December 18, 2015 | By Suzette Parmley, Staff Writer
Boyds co-owner Jeff Glass took one look at the first and second floors after the fire at the Center City clothier Nov. 30 and thought the damage was minimal. All of the pricey inventory - mostly designer suits for men, and dresses and coats for women - was intact. Other than some water damage to the women's area on the third level, it looked as if the venerable store at 1818 Chestnut St. had gotten off easy. But Glass then took the elevator to the fourth floor, and when the doors opened, he could smell the fire damage that destroyed the big and tall section and customer pickup area, also known as will call.
NEWS
October 30, 2015 | BY MENSAH M. DEAN, Daily News Staff Writer deanm@phillynews.com, 215-854-4172
FOUR-AND-A-HALF months after a water main break sent 10 million gallons of water washing through homes and businesses in a West Philadelphia neighborhood, residents are still living with Halloween-like horror stories of black mold, structural damage and unpaid claims. The frustrated residents lined up yesterday to tell City Council's Committee on Transportation and Public Utilities about the hardships they've endured since the June 14 break that damaged 78 homes and business in the area of 52nd Street between Wyalusing and Westminster avenues.
NEWS
July 13, 2015 | By Kevin Riordan, Inquirer Columnist
As the storm slammed into Clarksboro, Pam Kafka took shelter in her Kings Highway basement. "I heard the wind blowing and things cracking and breaking," the retired teacher recalls. "It sounded like a hurricane. " Emerging from the house about 10 minutes later, Kafka, 64, discovered that most of the landscape she loved was gone. Hundreds of trees on her family's property were uprooted, twisted, and broken - nearly four acres of dense woods so splintered and stripped that the property barely looks like home.
NEWS
July 3, 2015 | BY REGINA MEDINA, Daily News Staff Writer medinar@phillynews.com, 215-854-5985
DEPLORABLE conditions at some of Philadelphia's district schools were alleged yesterday by City Controller Alan Butkovitz, who described them as "not something that happens in a First World country. " Evidence of asbestos in Francis Scott Key Elementary School in South Philadelphia; water damage in Samuel S. Fels High School in Crescentville; cockroaches crawling around restrooms in Central High School in Olney. It's all detailed in a report released during a Controller's Office news conference.
NEWS
July 3, 2015 | By Kristen A. Graham and Dylan Purcell, Inquirer Staff Writers
In a sweep of Philadelphia public schools, investigators from the City Controller's Office found a litany of health and safety threats, including exposed electrical wires, cockroaches, and widespread water damage. City Controller Alan Butkovitz, in releasing a report detailing "outrageous" School District building conditions, said his office found immediate health hazards that seemed to be largely ignored by district officials. "Why isn't that a public health emergency?" Butkovitz asked at a news conference.
NEWS
June 30, 2015 | By Edward Colimore, Inquirer Staff Writer
A year and a half ago, most of the Camden County Historical Society's three-building complex was closed by water damage, the result of broken pipes during a severe winter cold snap. Leaks sprouted in the Camden County Museum, then in the Charles S. Boyer Building, where the Richard Hineline Library and administrative offices are located; and later in Pomona Hall, an 18th-century plantation house. But the setback didn't stop the institution from hosting visitors and researchers even as repairs got underway and plans were made for the future - now with help from the Nonprofit Center at La Salle University in Philadelphia.
REAL_ESTATE
June 14, 2015 | By Alan J. Heavens, Inquirer Real Estate Writer
So far, what has passed for spring in the Philadelphia area this year has been relatively calm and much too dry. Yet Farmers Insurance reports that examined claims in 2013 and 2014 showed that spring accounted for more than one-third of all homeowners' claims nationwide during that two-year period. April, May, and June saw a 52 percent increase in homeowners' claims over January, February, and March, the claims showed. Twenty-five percent of all homeowners' claims filed during the spring in Pennsylvania were for water-related issues.
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