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IN THE NEWS

Water Ice

SPORTS
February 22, 2003 | By Ira Josephs INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
The word was out two years ago, and Jay Carlin made sure water ice was available. Carlin, Conestoga's third-year track and field coach, was already thinking of the future when he took over the program after a successful run as girls' coach at Phoenixville. And the future looked fantastic judging from reports at Tredyffrin/Easttown Middle School and Valley Forge Middle School. "They said there would be a great class in two years," Carlin said. "When we had water ice for the [high school]
NEWS
January 8, 2003 | By Jennifer Wong
I'm a recent transplant from the San Francisco Bay area and I have been fascinated by the ongoing sagas regarding Penn's Landing and the "DisneyHole" at Eighth and Market Streets. It's kind of like watching a long-running soap opera. If you don't mind, this new Philadelphian would like to suggest some solutions. Go upscale with DisneyHole It's not necessary to choose between a parking garage and a city park. You can have both, the way San Francisco has with Union Square. It's the absolute center of shopping and hotels - the tony Mark Hopkins and Grand Hyatt Hotels, along with Saks Fifth Avenue and Macy's.
BUSINESS
September 30, 2002 | By Reid Kanaley INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Business owner Donna DuBose Miller - a onetime water-ice vendor and food-stamp recipient - eventually found she could make a living in a sideline to the funeral business. Among other things, her 10-year-old company, DuBose Printing & Business Services, in the city's Overbrook section, churns out about 750 "heritage keepsake programs" every year for grieving families. The sometimes elaborately printed folders or booklets include a detailed obituary and family history of the deceased, a page or more of photographs, poems and other remembrances, as well as the program for the memorial service.
NEWS
September 23, 2001 | By Sara Isadora Mancuso INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
Almost a necessity, but definitely one of summer's hot commodities ? water ice ? has just a few more months on the market. Then it's good-bye for the winter. Since shops reopened for the season in mid-March, business has stayed busy, peaking in June and July. As the season begins to wind down for a close about November, owners have said this year was highly successful for sales of custard, ice cream and water ice. Lines of people flooded into the parking lots of Mister Softee in Pennsauken and Cherry's of Cherry Hill during the summer, said shop owners.
NEWS
July 29, 2001 | By Monica Rhor INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
As still as Lyn Fuller perched on a stone ledge and wrapped in the private sounds of a soul singer crooning through the headphones of her portable CD player. That's Kelly Drive. As reverent as Michael Cantey bowed in prayer near a metal grating and immersed in praise of the Lord, whom he credits with keeping him free of drugs and alcohol for more than two months. As whimsical as Robert Rasmussen tilted against the blue van that marks his space near Boathouse Row, gleeful in his role as "Chief," the "Everything-for-$1" vendor who's been supplying regulars with pretzels, drinks and water ice for 60 years.
NEWS
April 18, 2001 | by Jim Nicholson Daily News Staff Writer
Elizabeth "Betty" Tumolo, a co-founder of Rita's Water Ice Franchise Corp., died Friday. She was 70 and lived in Northeast Philadelphia. Tumolo co-founded Rita's Water Ice with her son, Robert, in 1984. The mother and son team had originally intended to earn a few dollars by selling water ice from a front porch in Bensalem. But they soon found themselves with a winning recipe. In the next few years, their efforts, which later included her other son John, created the nation's largest water ice chain with over 225 operating stores throughout the Northeast and Southeast United States and as far west as Central Ohio.
FOOD
August 6, 2000 | By Aliza Green, FOR THE INQUIRER
Summer is not just ice cream. It's snow cones and water ice; sherbet, sorbet and sorbetto; granitas and batidos. All refreshing and flavorful ices. Ices have been a warm-weather ritual for some time. In Persia, sherbet (or sharbat) was a drink of ice or snow sweetened with fruit juice. A fifth-century visitor from China is reported to have observed: "The climate is very hot, and families keep ice in their houses. " This ice was likely brought down from the mountains and stored for the summer months using much the same method as that of Alexander the Great, who supposedly dug out pits and covered them with oak branches so that he would always have cooling snow available.
NEWS
August 1, 2000 | by Theresa Conroy , Daily News Staff Writer
Could we please get over the Rocky thing already? The original "Rocky" movie is 24 years old, yet - just when we think it's safe to take the back way into the Art Museum - the mono-syllabic boxer jabs us in the eye again. Witness the ghost of Rocky Balboa, as played out in the nation's press during the run-up to the Republican National Convention: In the New York Times: "We throw in a generous slice of 'Rocky,' the ultimate movie of Philadelphia and the redemption of the underdog.
FOOD
July 9, 2000 | By Craig LaBan, INQUIRER RESTAURANT CRITIC
I hold a drooping slice of Mack's plain cheese pizza up to Howard Trachtman's nose, and his eyes drift shut. "This is the smell that I think of," he says, breathing deeply, his nostrils just above the molten sheen of salty cheese. "If I were in Kansas City and you put this slice under my nose, I think: Wildwood. " If Marcel Proust had visited the Boardwalk, this obviously would have been his madeleine. Trachtman the real estate lawyer is suddenly transported to his youth. It is summer in the 1970s, and little Howard is pressing Kiss logos and Elks lodge decals onto T-shirts at Pegasus, the Boardwalk trinket store owned by his Grandpa Ruby and Grandma Gert.
NEWS
August 26, 1999 | By Faye Flam, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
With the third spacecraft to touch down on the surface of Mars now more than halfway to its destination, NASA yesterday announced where on the planet it will land. While the Viking and Mars Pathfinder missions landed in red, rock-strewn deserts, the Mars Polar Lander will touch down Dec. 3 in rolling hills of frozen tundra 500 miles from the Martian South Pole. There, at the fringe of a carbon-dioxide polar cap, the spacecraft will take panoramic pictures and send out a robotic arm designed to analyze the soil for traces of frozen water - apparently the remains of rushing rivers and vast oceans.
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