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Water Pollution

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NEWS
September 12, 1999 | By Jennifer Farrell, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
Environmental activists gathered yesterday on the banks of the Delaware River to ask Gov. Whitman and the state Department of Environmental Protection to reduce pollution in New Jersey waterways. The Clean Water Now! coalition - the New Jersey Environmental Federation, the New Jersey Public Interest Research Group citizen lobby, and the citizen outreach arm of the Sierra Club - used the rally at Wiggins Park to launch a campaign to try to persuade policy makers to adopt a three-point platform to protect state waterways as well as the environment and public health.
NEWS
September 25, 2013 | BY JOHN F. MORRISON, Daily News Staff Writer morrisj@phillynews.com, 215-854-5573
WOMEN DIDN'T wear lipstick at the Academy of Natural Sciences in the '30s. In fact, women were scarce in the scientific world in those days, and not really accepted by male-dominated institutions, such as the venerable academy. Maybe as a way to deny that women were even capable of looking into a microscope, displays of feminity in any form were frowned on. However, Ruth Myrtle Patrick soon proved that women were not only the equal of men in science, but, in many cases - hers included - could surpass male accomplishments in many realms and pave their own way to important discoveries.
NEWS
March 8, 2005 | By Nancy Petersen INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
For Amish children, school is a no-frills affair. They dutifully put in their 5 1/2 hours a day in a one-room schoolhouse. One teacher leads them through the basics - reading, writing and arithmetic. At the end of the day, they grab their colorful lunch pails, hop in the family buggy, and head home. No backpacks weigh them down, no extra papers flutter in their hands. So last year, when more than a thousand children in rural Chester and Lancaster Counties each came home with a two-foot sapling to plant, a small but dedicated band of environmentalists quietly declared victory.
NEWS
July 17, 1995
America has attacked water pollution forcefully since the early 1970s, but there's still much to be done. No longer do hundreds of millions of tons of raw sewage run into U.S. waters every year. Still, pollution caused more than 10,000 beach closings in the last five years. Unfortunately, the House in May voted to weaken the engine of progress against water pollution: the Clean Water Act of 1972. And last week, the House Appropriations Committee voted to cut the budget of the act's enforcer, the Environmental Protection Agency, by one-third.
NEWS
January 17, 2012
Former West Virginia Gov. Hulett C. Smith, 93, who signed bills in the 1960s that abolished the state's death penalty and implemented its first strip-mining laws, died Sunday in Arizona, where he had moved to an assisted living facility last fall, his family said Monday. Mr. Smith, a Democrat, first ran for governor in 1960, but failed to win his party's nomination. He was elected four years later, at a time when governors were limited to a single term. During his tenure, the Legislature enacted measures to control air and water pollution and to protect human rights.
NEWS
June 4, 2011
Having Philadelphia hailed by influential environmental groups for its plan to deal with storm runoff that contributes to water pollution is a win-win for the city. If the plan given official approval on Wednesday works as designed, Philadelphia in coming years will be greener - with more parkland, gardens, trees, and cutting-edge streets and paving that soak up water, instead of letting it run down the drain. With it being so important for a city's image and growth to create positive buzz, it's also an achievement that other metropolitan areas are said to be watching Philadelphia.
NEWS
February 24, 1987 | By Joyce Gemperlein, Inquirer Staff Writer
Leo and Agnes Salmon fled New Jersey six years ago, trading a farm with a view of the New York City skyline for a yellow Victorian farmhouse with red barns, a potbellied stove in the parlor and a big old kitchen perfumed by the tall, sweet pies Agnes bakes. The Salmons are farmers by nature and by trade, like many of their neighbors along Route 6, which worms northwest from Scranton along the ridges of the Endless Mountains. When they left New Jersey to escape an increasing spillover of people and air and water pollution from New York, the Salmons chose a farm in Troy Township, population 1,400, because it was surrounded by the things they love: beautiful hills, fertile plains, clear-running springs and, most of all, other farmers.
NEWS
June 19, 2015 | Inquirer Editorial Board
President Obama's late but welcome restoration of the government's power to keep polluters from dumping toxins upstream of drinking water supplies is undergoing its greatest challenge. Republicans and some Democrats are trying to scuttle the rule clarifying the extent of the government's powers under the Clean Water Act. Following the simple logic that poison dumped upstream will flow downstream and eventually into water taps, the new rule protects small streams, headwaters, and wetlands that are crucial to the quality of water supplies.
NEWS
May 7, 2000 | By Jennifer Moroz, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
Water pollution. Urban sprawl. The plight of the rain forest. They are issues that can be tough to swallow for many adults. So imagine trying to get a bunch of 8-year-olds to sit through - let alone understand - a lesson on the ills of the environment. With the help of some creative thinking and lots of props, Ed and Joyce Knorr do. Seven years ago, the chairman of the township environmental commission and his wife started the Green Club Kids, an environmental awareness program tailored to the elementary school level with the slogan: "Kids Can Make an Environmental Difference.
NEWS
August 6, 1998 | by Rob Laymon, For the Daily News
Not long ago, Linda Kelly of Absecon noticed something strange about the ocean near Atlantic City: You could see through it. "It was beautiful, a Caribbean blue-green," Kelly said. "And this in a place where you'd sometimes find debris floating. " Environmental officials have called this the best year for water quality in memory. Bacteria counts are at an all-time low, street runoff is under control and the temperatures have kept the red and brown tides away for the most part.
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NEWS
August 19, 2015 | By Caitlin McCabe, Inquirer Staff Writer
The Delaware County agency responsible for treating sewage from systems that serve 500,000 area residents has agreed to pay nearly $1.4 million to settle a claim it let pollutants seep into Ridley Creek, Chester Creek, and the Delaware River. In a lawsuit filed last month, the Delaware County Regional Water Authority was accused of too often letting untreated wastewater flow into the tributaries, endangering residents of Delaware County and parts of Chester County, many of whom live in low-income communities.
NEWS
June 19, 2015 | Inquirer Editorial Board
President Obama's late but welcome restoration of the government's power to keep polluters from dumping toxins upstream of drinking water supplies is undergoing its greatest challenge. Republicans and some Democrats are trying to scuttle the rule clarifying the extent of the government's powers under the Clean Water Act. Following the simple logic that poison dumped upstream will flow downstream and eventually into water taps, the new rule protects small streams, headwaters, and wetlands that are crucial to the quality of water supplies.
NEWS
July 16, 2014
ISSUE | GOV. CHRISTIE Homework to do How commendable of Gov. Christie to raise record amounts for the Republican Party ("Christie hits record in fund-raising effort," June 11). Meanwhile, in New Jersey - if he remembers the state that rocketed him into the national spotlight - we have a low credit rating amid no increase in jobs. The announced closing of the Showboat and Trump Plaza casinos will send thousands onto the unemployment line soon. And Revel? Remember all the tax incentives the governor gave to open that casino?
NEWS
September 25, 2013 | BY JOHN F. MORRISON, Daily News Staff Writer morrisj@phillynews.com, 215-854-5573
WOMEN DIDN'T wear lipstick at the Academy of Natural Sciences in the '30s. In fact, women were scarce in the scientific world in those days, and not really accepted by male-dominated institutions, such as the venerable academy. Maybe as a way to deny that women were even capable of looking into a microscope, displays of feminity in any form were frowned on. However, Ruth Myrtle Patrick soon proved that women were not only the equal of men in science, but, in many cases - hers included - could surpass male accomplishments in many realms and pave their own way to important discoveries.
NEWS
January 9, 2013 | By Matt Zencey
When Hollywood takes on a political issue, you can't expect a nuanced treatment. Still, as a journalist who has followed gas-drilling controversies in Pennsylvania and the Rocky Mountain West, I was hoping for better from Promised Land , the recently released movie about the evils that await rural communities when the gas companies show up. Set in a fictional Pennsylvania town, filmed outside Pittsburgh, and starring Matt Damon, the movie portrays...
NEWS
December 15, 2012 | By Wayne Parry, Associated Press
In the rush to rebuild the Shore, New Jersey's main environmental groups want governments to remember the painful lessons learned from Sandy. Decisions on where and how to rebuild will have far-reaching consequences, and if governments ignore the problems pointed out by the storm, they risk setting the state up for more destruction from future storms, the groups say. A coalition of the state's main environmental organizations issued a joint...
NEWS
October 12, 2012
AS THE CLEAN WATER Act turns 40 this week, it is important to recognize the progress it fostered. In 1972, major urban rivers were noxious watercourses. It was normal practice to regard such waters as convenient conveyances to transport wastes of industries and cities, with little regard for ecological and human consequences. The CWA had the ambitious goal of making all waters of the United States "fishable and swimmable. " While we still not have achieved this 100 percent, there has been remarkable transformation.
NEWS
August 29, 2012 | By Sandy Bauers, Inquirer Staff Writer
SANFORD, N.Y. - Back when Elizabeth and Margaret Davidson were little girls playing along the West Branch of the Delaware River, a ball, maybe, would float away. And they would say, "Guess it's headed for Philadelphia. " Decades later, that notion has taken on volumes of new meaning. The Davidsons' bucolic town about 235 river miles upstream of the Ben Franklin Bridge has become a flash point for the expansion of natural gas drilling to New York - and after, to northeastern Pennsylvania, the state's next frontier for hydraulic fracturing.
NEWS
February 20, 2012
By David S. Beckman Nearly every time it rains, water pollution problems follow. That's because the impenetrable surfaces of our cityscapes - buildings, sidewalks, roads - repel rainwater directly into storm drains and, ultimately, our waterways. Along the way, the water collects a toxic soup of oil, chemicals, animal waste, and trash. In many parts of the country, this polluted torrent overloads sewage treatment facilities, causing them to overflow and make matters worse.
NEWS
January 17, 2012
Former West Virginia Gov. Hulett C. Smith, 93, who signed bills in the 1960s that abolished the state's death penalty and implemented its first strip-mining laws, died Sunday in Arizona, where he had moved to an assisted living facility last fall, his family said Monday. Mr. Smith, a Democrat, first ran for governor in 1960, but failed to win his party's nomination. He was elected four years later, at a time when governors were limited to a single term. During his tenure, the Legislature enacted measures to control air and water pollution and to protect human rights.
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